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5

It is not necessary to throw the "just" away; the exasperation expressed by it (if that is indeed what you want to express by it---you speak of "humility," which I do not quite understand) can be approximated with tandem. Quendam means "a certain person" and is not an interrogative, so it is out of place here. Latin for "...


3

Almost! You can't just substitute an English word for a Latin word, but fortunately in your case merit comes from the Latin word meritum (itself coming from the Latin word merere meaning 'I earn'). A meritum is "something earned", though it can be both positive and negative. You'll often see the word in the plural meaning "the things you ...


3

There is no such Latin word persipe. Instead, I think you might have mistranscribed percipe, the name of an old magazine for the house as well. The -c- in percipe is often pronounced like an /s/ in England, among other places. Percipe is an imperative verb meaning, "Percieve!" or "Behold!" or even "Seize!" The basic action is ...


4

I would say: Ne destiteris ad quod maxime oportet niti. Although in English, we often use never with negative imperatives, I believe it's less common in Latin. According to Latin Grammar by Allen and Greenough, the usually way for expressing prohibitions are as follows: 450. Prohibition is regularly expressed in classic prose (1) by nōlī with the ...


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