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1

Acceptamus ("We accept") conventum nostrum Parisien et auctoritate ("with the authority of") sanctissimi domini nostri Pauli papae IIII subiicimus ("we bring it under the command of") illum (i.e. the monastery) immediate curae ... magistri ordinis ... et per omnia committimusque illi, ut ... restituat illum ad optimam formam tam ...


5

Carpe futurum is certainly one way of saying what you want to say. You could equally well say carpe futura ("seize the future [things]") using the neuter plural, or carpe futuras (sc. dies), i.e. "seize the future [days]" (in this case, I'd make dies out to be feminine, as it refers to a point of time). Instead of carpe you could also use ...


2

Here is a translation of the add-on (which is rather interesting IMHO): “[B]ut since he had upset the Master of the Order Brother Vincentius Justiniani, the reason for which I do not find, unless perhaps that he strongly resisted to the attempt of the latter to separate the Parisian monastery from the French province and to place it under his own immediate ...


3

As always, more context would help, but I understand that may simply not be available. My understanding is that the two dudes in question had been naughty in some way or another (...); an attempt at translation follows (with my reservations in square brackets): However, the brothers A. Abeli, a teacher, and D. Sergent, we denounce [I think] as unworthy, the ...


2

I would suggest: Homo in palatio! Memento mori, semper sis in metu mortis. Ne diutius nos vexes. A few points: Regia is short for domus regia, which literally means “royal house.” So it is a palace all right, but a king's or queen's palace. (Or at least I would say this word has a strong association with royalty.) I preferred palatio here because it is ...


4

Your question appears to me to be entirely appropriate for this site. Mottos and dedications (and tattoos) are regularly featured here. That said, your phrase is not correct, as the adjective you're looking for is splendidus, -a, -um and not splendidis. It should therefore be: Splendida mens mea (You asked if your proposal was “a proper construction.” Well,...


4

Your “translation exercise” is a famous (I thought) fragment from Nepos’ “Hannibal” (from De exellentibus ducibus, 2.1): “Nam ut omittam Philippum, quem absens hostem reddidit Romanis, omnium iis temporibus potentissimus rex Antiochus fuit. Hunc tanta cupiditate incendit bellandi, ut usque a rubro mari arma conatus sit inferre Italiae.” [incendit = “he fired ...


2

It strikes as not only possible, but likely. I don't see a reason to disregard Antwerpiae as a possible nominative/vocative (the name of the city in Flemish is Antwerpen, which even to a native speaker today sounds similar to a plural and plural forms for city names are, of course, as old/common as anything, e.g. the obviously analogy with Athenae).


4

The impossibilibus strikes me as less than classical (not that that makes it bad per se). Likewise quantalibet incredulitas. How about quamvis incredibile? As for deinde est credendum, perhaps fieri non potest quin sit credendum.


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