New answers tagged

2

Short answer: "Please to meet you" - no evidence in Lewis&Short lexicon for this usage. Yes and no. As usual, it depends on context. The true answer is no, but most of the time it looks like yes. And it's because subjects can be implied. Long answer: No evidence for this use. You may find in poetry (Terence, Plautus, etc) some common Latin ...


0

Two looks the most wrong, like Google Translate bad. One appears to have a declension error and conjugation error, and literally means "This (feminine thing). We are defending." (bear in mind that the this here is not grammatically connected to the verb here" The translation relies on what the "this" that the motto refers to. If it ...


3

The best place for the nominative nos is nowhere. You should leave it out, unless you want to particularly stress it (it is us who are greater, not those other guys). In that case the default position would be at the start of the sentence. (This is also why one of the most well-known words in the Latin language, ego, is not all that frequently encountered in ...


1

Hallucinatoria/mercatoria work OK, but -oria endings can feel constructed, like when we add -ness to create abstract nouns (i.e. "hotness" for "heat.") Here are a few more choices. fraus, fraudis - delusion, deceit, trickery, fraud. alucinatio (=hallucinatio) sounds fine but it's rare and means "daydream." Nothing wrong with ...


1

I suggest artithmetica mercatoria fraudifera. More literally, this is "the deceit-carrying mercantile number-science". While not idiomatic English, it describes what the Latin words are all about. The original phrase "delusional sales arithmetic" is a good match. I find it most idiomatic in Latin to qualify the "arithmetic" with ...


1

How about arithmetica hallucinatoria venditorum? That would mean the delusional arithmetic of salespeople.


9

Other than the phrase in question, your translation is excellent. Tanti is a so-called "genitive of indefinite value", see Allen and Greenough section 417. This is a use of adjectives expressing quantity in the context of a verb whose meaning can assign or assess value, as here fit: literally, "it (the judgment) becomes / is made of such value ...


0

The greater context talks about how people 'knew God' but "exchanged the glory of the immortal God for images made to look like a mortal human being and birds and animals and reptiles." i.e. pagans and idolaters. So god handed them over to 'desires of their hearts unto uncleaness (ακαθαρσίαν)" So, in that context, here is what I got from the ...


8

Here's my attempt at a compromise between extreme literalism and full idiomatic English (so that hopefully it'll be helpful to you as you compare against the Greek). Greek text taken from the SBL edition, with a couple parts rearranged slightly to make the English flow better. This edition notably adds accents and breathings (which weren't consistent in the ...


0

How about the adjective hortensis or hortensius for "garden", or the phrase per hortum to emphasize that the garden serves as a separation, rather than a surrounding? So, e.g. colloquium hortense or sermo per hortum?


3

Somnus means "sleep". Somnium means "dream". One need not be an (ex) linguist to see these words are related, but they are distinct words with different meanings. I suppose you could work with both, but since you explicitly asked for "dream", I would recommend somnium. Now ex is a preposition that always requires the ablative ...


4

To take the Latin first: no. Hoc faciebam would mean "I was making this", as you say, but Hoc feceram would mean "I had made this" - that is, that the making is in the past with respect to a past time; the past time being specified elsewhere in your discourse. So in your particular case, that is going too far. Beyond that, the answer ...


6

Pluperfect refers to "the past of the past": an event that happened before another past event. The usual English translation is "I had made this", as in "I had made this before they stole it". The perfect tense can have two different meanings in Classical Latin: it can either indicate that something's been completed and it's the ...


1

Interestingly both mittere and projicere are found in the Vulgate bible in the famous Joseph story where Joseph is thrown in a pit by his brethren (Gen 37). So on that authority alone I'd say both of your candidates would be sound choices. However, it seems to me that demittere may be also appropriate: to send down; to drop; to let, sink, or bring down; to ...


1

So, the way the construction works is a simple predicate nominative with sum, infinitives are considered neuter singular, ergo. Any word for throw you want will work with the same construction: "X est humanum" X being, iacere, proicere, abicere, contorquere, torquere etc.


7

Indeed, both word orders are fine, although it is more common to put the adjective second. But beware that the two words you have don't have exactly the same meaning as "perfect body" nor do they necessarily make an idiomatic translation: Perfectum is really a participle meaning quite literally "thoroughly done" and often means "...


2

That is not quite correct: nova eruditio, because it is the direct object of requirere, should be in the accusative case: novam eruditionem.


4

You should know that Google Translate is no good for Latin. "Of the stars" would generally be expressed by a genitive plural form, astrorum. "Ad astra" roughly means "to the stars". I don't think you should use the form "dulcedinem". Latin inflects nouns for their role in the sentence. "Dulcedinem" is ...


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