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-1

If your sundial were in the U.S., the proper inscription would be "Anno Pestium" (using genitive plural instead of genitive singular).


7

Facta, non verba IS the motto you're looking for. It actually is a common motto (lists of examples: 1, 2) Its grammar is perfectly fine, as already said. It seemingly showed up as a Latinism in English around 1830. I'm not aware of an ancient source using the exact phrase, though the idea is obviously old (see Expedito Bipes' excellent quote of Cicero in ...


14

That's almost right, except it should be in the genitive: In anno plagae. However, as cmw pointed out, the preposition in is optional. Besides that, the word plaga is very general and can refer to a number of different types of affliction. A more specific word would be pestilentia, which means: an infectious disease, plague, pest, pestilence It also has to ...


5

I would say: Non verba, sed facta. Not words, but deeds This would be consistent with something Cicero once said: sunt facta verbis difficiliora deeds are more difficult than words


5

Smith's has this: finishing-stroke: extrema sive ultima manus : to give the f. to the war, bello extremam m[anum] imponere, Virg. Aen. 7,572. Phr.: to put the f. to a war, bellum commissum ac profligatum conficere, Liv. 21,40, extr.: to a work, opus coeptum profligatumque perficere, Aug. in Mon. Ancyr. While profligatum [per/con]ficere is fine, keeping ...


4

In addition to the excellent answers already given, Pinkster's dictionary mentions two interesting expressions, for which I have also found quotations: in mortem destringere ferrum: "to draw the sword for the coup de grâce" Tacitus, Annales 14.8.1.22: Circumsistunt lectum percussores et prior trierarchus fusti caput eius adflixit. Iam in mortem ...


3

In addition to Expedito Bipes' excellent answer, if your context is “to give someone the coup de grâce,” you can use the idiom aliquem conficere, e.g. Venator leonem confecit. The hunter finished the lion off. No implied notion of mercyfulness, obviously. It can also be used of inanimate objects, but note that conficio has a range of meanings, and ...


11

According to Collins Dictionary, coup de grâce means: a mortal or finishing blow, esp one delivered as an act of mercy to a sufferer a final or decisive stroke The French word grâce conveys the idea that it's a blow of mercy (perhaps as a euphemism), i.e., with the purpose of putting someone out of their misery. However, it's often used simply to mean a ...


8

Unfortunately neither suggested translation is correct. In Latin de is a preposition meaning "(down) from", although similar words are used to express the genitive in Romance languages. What you need is the nominative of the son (filius is the nominative) and genitive of the forest (the genitive of silva is silvae). So the translation should be ...


4

Idioms are notoriously difficult to translate, because they rely on the peculiarities of the language to express an idea, and playing with the words of one idioms often means you don't have a direct way of playing with those words. In this case, the typical way of expressing "have it your way" is with vincere (see II.γ, and conceding to their whim ...


1

Thanks to @d_e, @cmw and @brianpck for your corrections and suggestions. Regarding (1), we went with "super omnia amorem desideratis." Regarding (2), the author decided to take out the line in question, which saved a great deal of trouble. Your points about possible unwanted connotations of "maneo" and "consumo" were well made ...


5

Having said that, vocabulum is a single vocable; it would at least be necessary to say Dramatis vocabula. That does in fact sound quite good. I would recommend against dramatis verba, which, like the English "the words of the play," is a bit too general. In Middle Latin (= Medieval Latin) you also have vocabularium, which means (and is of course ...


4

I don't know how much you want changed, so I'll just tackle your two questions for now. What about: Super omnia amorem desideras, "You desire love above all." (cf. Aeneid 9.283) Is there a reason you're in the plural here? But anyway, the grammar breaks down heavily here. Why is it vocative? The lack of punctuation in the English is actually an ...


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