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2 votes

"hōc enim ūnō modō...scelus" or "hoc enim ūnō modō...scelus" ? (Ritchie's Fabulae faciles, §20)

I think hōc here goes with modo. I would translate as "for in this way alone could such a deed be atoned for." However, I guess it could go with scelus also, like Cicero's "hoc tantum ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

"hōc enim ūnō modō...scelus" or "hoc enim ūnō modō...scelus" ? (Ritchie's Fabulae faciles, §20)

Both readings are plausible and the essential message is the same, so the choice of interpretation might not even show up in a translation. The distinction is there, but my first point is to encourage ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes

Very new learner looking for feed back

First, welcome to this forum, and congratulations on your decision to learn the beautiful Latin language. Rem pulcherrimam aggressus es, quae tibi magnam adferat gaudiam. (You have embarked on a most ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
3 votes

Very new learner looking for feed back

This response is to provide feedback on the translation as asked, as opposed to providing a translation. The 'we active present tense' form for the verbs:- latro, latrare, is latramus, for the verb:-...
fantome's user avatar
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3 votes

To be One's Own Worst Enemy

Here is a variation on the theme expressed in Seb's answer, also from Cicero: "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" 5. 28: "necesseque est, si quis sibi ipsi inimicus est, eum quae bona sunt ...
tony's user avatar
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