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7

Indeed, if you want these two words, the correct agreement is animal fidele for the neuter gender.


3

Unfortunately your suggestion does not quite work. One of the issues is that there are all kinds of past tenses in there, but I think this works better in the present tense. But I'm glad that you asked! It is indeed best to check that something makes sense before tattooing it. First, let us choose the words. I suggest: breath = spirare stand = stare fight =...


1

An indirect question always uses subjunctive (also called conjunctive) in Latin. You just write the question as if it were a normal question, and then change indicative to subjunctive. An accusative with infinitive cannot be used for indirect questions. Unless the question contains a question word (quis, quando, or similar), an indirect question is often ...


2

As an indirect question in subjunctive: "Quaerit an/utrum civitas capta sit."


16

Your suggestions are not quite right, and they might in fact be badly misunderstood. There are two things to consider here. The first one is simple. Omnia is plural and the verb must agree. Omnia (ex)urunt is grammatically valid. The second and more complicated thing is ergativity. Some English verbs behave ergatively, meaning that the one experiencing the ...


15

When (Sir) Terry Pratchett was knighted, he chose this phrase as his heraldic motto. The official translation in that context is Noli Timere Messorem. This isn't the most natural word order (which would be noli messorem timere), but the meaning is the same: a command to a single person, "do not fear the reaper".


6

Death's motto makes me recall the Centurion scene in Monty Python's The Life of Brian. Non timetis in fact "don't fear", but rather "(you all) don't fear" in the indicative, rather than the imperative. Also "Messor" is in the nominative rather than the accusative. I expect that Mr Pratchett either deliberately mangled the phrase to be facetious or he simply ...


22

Neither is correct, and timetere isn't a real Latin word. A correct translation depends somewhat on whether the command is directed at one person (e.g., you, the bearer of the tattoo) or the world at large (e.g., those who see the tattoo). For the former case (audience = one person), you could say Noli messorem timere or Ne messorem timueris. Ne messorem ...


3

encouraged to upgrade from a comment: Given the epigrammatic nature of mottoes, I wonder whether one needs to be explicit about either the fas or the world. What about simply “Redde meliorem”? It would fit better on the stone and make the viator think a bit. Actually, now I think of it: MELIOREM REDDE may be better. The only problem I can see is that ...


4

I would suggest "specierum fractor". Explanation "Fractor" is a noun derived from "frango (-is, -ĕre, -i, -actus)", meaning "to break". "Specierum" is Gn.Pl.F of "species (-ei)", which means "image, appearance, idea, impression", etc., and which was widely used in Antiquity and the Middle Ages. It is roughly equivalent to the Greek "εἰκών". Here it is ...


12

Domitor (without the -um, which is unnecessary here) would be a breaker in the sense of a breaker of wild horses. It doesn't have to do with physical breaking, which is what you want. Instead, you can use a derivative of a verb such as frangere – e.g., fractor. Though this word is unattested (at least in classical Latin), it's easy enough to derive it. You ...


4

Your translation of that sentence is perfect. I read it mainly as simple Latin to be understood from context without use of a dictionary, enabling you to easily infer the meaning of the word hīc at its first use in the book, as well as get you accustomed to the sentence pattern with sed. There might, however, be an additional, subtle part to the meaning. ...


5

For "it is right" I would use fas est. Literally this means "it is in accordance with divine law" (as opposed to human law), but in common use it just means "it is right/good/proper". It's typically linked up to an infinitive. Reddere is not a bad choice for "leave"; it literally means to give something back, or give it up to someone else. In this case, you'...


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