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3

Both of these go back to Proto-Greek palatal nasals. There are two reconstructed roots behind βαίνω: some forms come from *gʷem-, while others come from *gʷeh₂-. These two roots look extremely similar and seem to have identical semantics, so it's likely they were related within PIE—but it's not a regular or well-understood alternation. Compare Vedic present ...


4

We can resort to Leviticus 19:18. (Do not seek revenge or bear a grudge against anyone among your people,). Both (which occurs much less often than one would think) the Vulgate and Castellio, use the same formula: nec memor eris injuriae civium tuorum (Vulgate) neve acceptae ab eis [popularibus] iniuriae memor esto (Castellio) This is quite interesting ...


3

The dictionary entry for κιχάνω is enormous, so check it out for all its various forms. Simply put, the verb has athematic forms. The relevant part is in Smyth §688: The following ω-verbs have in poetry (especially in Homer) second aorists of the μι form: ... Epic κιχάνω (ἐκίχην, κιχήω, κιχείη, κιχῆναι and κιχήμεναι, κιχείς and κιχήμενος; properly from ...


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