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11

Two more: In mari meri miri mori muri accidit. In a sea of delightful wine, a mouse happened to die. which may have no particular author, and a 14th century one from a headstone of the Church of San Procolo in Bologna, Italy: Si procul a Proculo Proculi campana fuisset, nunc procul a Proculo Proculus ipse foret. If the bell of [the Church of ...


5

I would express "mind" here with animus. Lewis and Short list the meanings "rational soul", "senses", "intellect", "mind", and "memory" in their dictionary. Another option would be mens, but I think the somewhat more emotional nuance of animus is a better fit for this purpose. As ex libris is "from the books", "from the mind" would be ex animo. To make a ...


7

It occurred to me that some of Cicero's poetry is in a similar stylistic vein to Ennius's, and a very quick review of the extant fragments did turn up a few isolated lines that, if not actual tongue-twisters, come pretty close: aetheris aeterni saepta atque inclusa cavernis [From book 2 of De consolatu suo] nunc ea, Torquato quae quondam et consule ...


26

Quintus Ennius loved alliteration and produced a few verses, which he probably did not intend as tongue-twisters, but which might be called that: O Tite tute Tati, tibi tanta, tyranne, tulisti. Mater optumatum multo mulier melior mulierum. Stultust qui cupita cupiens cupienter cupit. Quicquam quisquam cuiquam, quod conveniat, neget? Machina multa minax ...


6

The beginning of Orbis Pictus (1658) by Comenius has a list of sounds corresponding to the letters of the alphabet, meant for young students ("boys"). I have reproduced it from the 1748 edition of the Latin-German-Hungarian version (http://real-r.mtak.hu/624/, pdf pages 25-27), omitting the grammatical information on the nouns. The English translations are ...


2

"Diem in Monimentum" means '(someone does something) into/against a monument.' If I would translate memorial day, it would either be a direct translation of the English phrase: "Dies Monumenti" aka Day of the Monument. 'Dies' is in the nominative case, as most Latin words are by default. Otherwise, I would translate what you are celebrating. Memorial day ...


2

You could probably do something like Dies Memorialis (sing) or Dies Memorialum (plural), which should be fairly easy to understand for non-speakers of Latin. I personally like the latter better since Memorial Day is about more than a single person.


6

No, that translation is not grammatically valid. It means roughly "belief of law, long use, to be saved firmly" but it is somewhat incoherent. Let me go through a translation process step by step. As you seem to know, opinio iuris is a fixed expression and we can of course start with that. The modifiers will probably not be parts of standard legal Latin ...


0

I still stand by my answer above, but I will also give another one, because in matters of style, there are often many reasons to do a thing a certain way, and not just one reason. Sir James Mountford's Bradley's Arnold Latin Prose Composition (BALPC) #174 points out that dependent clauses are often used in place of abstract nouns as a matter of Latin style. ...


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