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Ultio is indeed good for "revenge". The wordings that more literally match "everything is revenge" sound a little awkward to me, so I suggest instead: Nihil nisi ultio. Nothing but revenge. This sounds like proper Latin and seems to get the same message across. You can also add a verb to both languages (or just English and leave it implicit in Latin): ...


5

I suggest merda est!, nicely mirroring the Romance expressions è una merda (It.), c'est la merde (Fr.) etc. The following is an excerpt of Martial's Epigrams, Liber III, 17: Circumlata diu mensis scribilita secundis urebat nimio saeva calore manus; sed magis ardebat Sabidi gula: protinus ergo sufflavit buccis terque quaterque suis. Illa quidem ...


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"Lorem ipsum" is the name for a class of text used by printers and book designers to facilitate the layout of a Page. The fact that it has no meaning helps focus attention on, say, margins and the weight of the type chosen for headings and footnotes. Printers believe that it comes from a speech by Cicero; but if so it has been so hacked about and reassembled ...


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Another quite possible meaning of puer meus or puella mea would be "my servant (or slave)". I don't recall ever seeing mulier mea used for "my wife"; for that uxor would be a lot more common.


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Requiescant in pace is what you are looking for. Just as you say, third person, plural, subjunctive, present tense form, may they rest in peace. (Requiesce in pace, instead, is singular, imperative mood, so the sentence is commanding someone to rest in peace, or figuratively, wishing it.) Both the plural and singular (requiescat in pace) forms have ...


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