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There's a construction with the supine. "Laborare solutu." This means "to work to solve" or, more literally "To work with respect to solving."


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If "work to solve" means you are giving someone the command "Work, in order to solve (something)", then you could say that as Labora ut solvas. That's if you're talking to one person. If you're talking to more than one person then you would say Laborate ut solvatis.


1

While Latin is often considered “dead,” there is still a sizeable worldwide community of people who write (and sometimes speak) in Latin. As you probably know, the Catholic church still regularly publishes documents in Latin, there are some Latin radio programmes, and so on. These people have constantly been coining Latin expressions for the things of the ...


3

The most obvious verb to use here is venari, which you've found. The difficulty is, that it's what's called a deponent verb – it has, for the most part, only passive forms; and these are, for the most part, only active in meaning. So it isn't possible to use both active and passive forms of the verb, as is done in the English sentence that you're translating ...


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Schola vitae is attested, especially in Medieval Latin. Examples include Doctrina [est] schola vitae, or (from Ephemerides Liturgicae) Praxis genuina liturgiae est schola vitae interioris.


2

I would translate "willpower" as either voluntas or animus, preferably the first one. (The second one is good specifically if you want to distinguish between "willingness" and "resolve".) "Mortal" in the sense of "able to die" = "not divine" is mortalis; alternately, "human" = "not divine" would be humanus. So the end result would either be voluntas ...


5

Since all current answers address the sexual meaning of "fucked", I will provide alternatives for the case of "fucked" => "broken". Fractus Broken, shattered or its related Confractus Destroyed Both of these can of course be used with an optional intensifying prefix to provide the "totally" ingredient. The full phrase could be translated ...


1

There is, also "carpe iter" = "take one's (your) way" (Pock. Ox. Lat. Dict.). This "iter" is a neuter noun, therefore, the accusative is the same as the nominative. Definitions include: journey; march; route; road; foot-way.


13

As Joonas said, I would use a form of the participle fututus, literally "fucked". Here's one example, from Catullus VI: Cur? Nōn tam later' ecfutūta pandās, nī tu quid faciās ineptiārum Why? Because you wouldn't display your fucked-out body like this unless you were doing something obscene. (In this poem, Catullus is saying it's obvious that ...


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The Latin verb futuere is a good translation for the English verb "fuck" in the sense of sexual intercourse. The past participle fututus means "fucked" in this sense. As often in Latin, this can be intensified with a prefix. The adjective defututus can well be translated as "totally fucked", although many dictionaries give much softer translations like "...


4

Close! You'll want Carpe Viam, with an M at the end. Via isn't a perfect translation of "lane", and carpe doesn't actually mean "seize" (it's closer to "harvest"), but the saying is well-enough-known in English and the meanings close enough that it'll be easily understandable, and the pun works better with viam than with any more-precise word.


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This is kind of a subjective question. Here's what I can think of: Vita et Mors (or Mors et Vita) -- I like this for its simplicity, readability, and recognizability. Vita Morsque (Or Mors Vitaque) -- It means the same thing "Life and Death" but it is more idiomatic Latin, I think. Res Vitae et Mortis -- "Res" means "matters, goings-on." This means "...


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While one may intuitively think of using me or memet for "myself" here, the thing to keep in mind is that in your sentence "myself" is a predicative nominative - always look at the performed function in the sentence. This tells us we must use the nominative for it, that is ego again. Therefore the phrase is ego sum ego or, for more emphasis, ego egomet ...


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