New answers tagged

1

I don't think there is a genuinely good way to answer your question as originally posed (I noticed that you changed it to be about a translation of the English translation, not about translating the mantra itself). Firstly, note that any Latin translation of the English translation given would be just that – a translation of a translation. It would certainly ...


1

I would propose the following translation: Eligimus summam lucem divini solis; animos nostros impellat. For "divine," I took the easy route and used divinus. It seems to carry the secondary meaning "sublime" better than plain divus, for example. Also, it seems to have been used in conjunction with sol at times. For the curious English &...


0

Two looks the most wrong, like Google Translate bad. One appears to have a declension error and conjugation error, and literally means "This (feminine thing). We are defending." (bear in mind that the this here is not grammatically connected to the verb here" The translation relies on what the "this" that the motto refers to. If it ...


1

How about dives fiam etsi pereas?


2

Vincenzo already gave you the Latin for “washing machine,” but since you asked for the “washer,” I would like to suggest: Quis lavabit ipsum lavatorem? OK, lavator is a word I made up, but it turns out it's actually attested. (The only attestation is apparently in the Philoxenus glossary, an obscure Latin–Greek dictionary which probably dates back to late ...


3

Quis lavabit ipsam lavatoriam (machinam)? Firstly, "to wash" is lavare. Note that the verb custodiet is in fact a future tense, so following that, we get here lavabit. As for "washer", it can be translated as machina lavatoria, "washing machine". Given that it needs to be in the accusative as it is the direct object - this ...


8

I'll offer something with a slightly different approach in an attempt to be more idiomatic in structure: Si quis tibi occurrit, sua habet certamina abscondita. If anyone meets you, they have their own hidden struggles. Opening a sentence with a condition with si quis appears to be very common and feels like an idiomatic way to say essentially "...


6

The phrase everyone you meet seems like a idiomatic way to say everybody, so I would translate it as: Omnis certamen certat quod nequaquam scis. A simpler way to say it, although with less emphasis, would be: Omnis certamen certat quod nescis.


3

I think it is rather a proverb (or idiom if you will), than a motto. I personally remember it since high school as "Solomon's Seal". Nevertheless, here are some variants I have stumbled upon: Et hoc abibit and another variant, which literally should mean "these too shall pass" (i.e. "even this bad time will end one day") Et ...


3

The best place for the nominative nos is nowhere. You should leave it out, unless you want to particularly stress it (it is us who are greater, not those other guys). In that case the default position would be at the start of the sentence. (This is also why one of the most well-known words in the Latin language, ego, is not all that frequently encountered in ...


4

I'm not aware of an established proverb, but if you want to convey the meaning "don't become angry, but [calmly] avenge yourself" you could translate noli irasci, ulciscere or (to keep the parallelism of the English phrase) ne irascere, ulciscere.


3

How about transcende te ipsum? Or, if the person if question is indeed female, transcende te ipsam. transcende is the imperative singular of transcendere (to transcend, surpass), te is the accusative singular second person personal pronoun ("you" as the direct object of a verb), ipsum (masculine) or ipsam (feminine) are the accusative singular ...


6

Si sermo est de mergendis, exempli causa, crusticulis in lactem: 🍪 → 🥛 … vel de mergendo toro oleo fervido cocto in cafeum, ut mos barbaricus est Americanorum: 🍩 → ☕ … vocabulum tingere, vel potius frater ejus, intingere aptissimum mihi videtur. Sed id vocabulum non significat motum deorsum, neque motum in vasem, etc., sed res madefacere quovis humore. ...


1

Since a Dunker (German Tunker) is originally a member of an Anabaptist Sect practising triple immersion, use baptizo, baptizare, Late ecclesiastical Latin, Greek loan word.


5

magna fenestra is fine, but as noted by @Sebastian Koppehel, historia is written history, rather than the historical events themselves which you probably want to refer to. So I suggest magna ad antiqua fenestra or magna ad antiquitatem fenestra or magna ad vetustatem fenestra.


9

Whether you say fenestra magna or magna fenestra is up to you – both is absolutely fine in Latin. If you go with fenestra at all, I recommend using the preposition ad, because there is a precedence from Terence (Heautontimorumenos 3,1,72): quantam fenestram ad nequitiam patefeceris “what a great window to licentiousness you will have opened.” But that is not ...


1

You can say "beautiful things" simply by using the neuter plural pulchra. Existence can be expressed by esse, so sunt is fine. The gerundive must be congruent to the subject, so it has to be intellegenda. So pulchra intellegenda sunt. Or you could say pulchra sunt ad intellegendum or pulchra sunt ut intellegantur.


1

Review of "Res pulchrae intellegendus sunt" First, the gerundive, like regular adjective, should match its subject in gender, case and number. In that case res is f. pl. nom., so that yields: "Res pulchrae intellegendae sunt". Second, I think you are right to feel the sound is somewhat not what you are aiming to. The tone of "Res ...


0

Maybe a shorter phrase like "unseen presence" or "phantom sentinel" would work - something with "ubique" like "ubique umbra"


4

I would suggest imperatrix magnifica mundi/mundorum, which could be translated as "the great empress of the world/worlds". I chose imperatrix, which is a female version of imperator and can be translated as "empress" if imperator is "empreror". It feels like a powerful and idiomatic word for a powerful female in command. Another ...


4

The adjective needs to be congruent with the noun it modifies, in this case domina, which is feminine, so it has to be magna. So you have magna domina mundi - the great [female] ruler of the world, magna domina mundorum - the great [female] ruler of the worlds. The word order is flexible, so you could equally well say domina magna instead of magna domina. ...


2

There is already an excellent answer, but perhaps a different suggestion might still be welcome? You could also phrase it as adsumus semper, numquam spectamur — we are always present, we are never observed. adsum has the connotation of being helpful, which might be a nice touch.


2

How about in libris refugium — in books there is refuge? or libri refugia — books are refuges (in the plural)? Or effugio in libros — I escape into books?


0

The classic Carpe diem may be a good fit for the sentiment here, especially considering the line from Horace containing it: Carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero. It urges acting now rather than putting things off for later, which I think captures the gist pretty well. Not a literal translation, of course, but quite apt.


10

A relative clause in English often well translated with a participle in Latin. Depending on which way you want to phrase it, you can use absentes (those who are not present) or praesentes (those who are present). The simplest phrasing would be, I think, filios meos absentes amo, "I love my children who are away". But the nuance needs to be changed ...


1

Literally, you could say nunc totum expende (spend the whole now as an imperative). EDIT: Or you could combine all of the existing answers and say nunc est expendum, nunc mente libera carpenda dies (with dies feminine, because it corresponds to nunc and hence denotes a specific day).


0

How about the adjective hortensis or hortensius for "garden", or the phrase per hortum to emphasize that the garden serves as a separation, rather than a surrounding? So, e.g. colloquium hortense or sermo per hortum?


4

How about filios amo etiam absentes (or filias amo etiam absentes if they are all girls) — I love my children [sons] also while they are absent. EDIT: since it seems you want something different stressing the love, how about emphasizing it by using two different terms for love? filios amans diligo viatores — loving [my] children, I cherish [them as] ...


6

It is good that you clarified your children are still alive, because the English "are no longer with me" can easily sound a bit like a euphemism. It seems your children are in a different place than you; in other words absent, which is in fact derived from the Latin absens. (Absens can in fact also euphemistically refer to a deceased person, but it ...


1

The very literal translation consequentias habet would appear to be acceptable in modern Latin (e.g. it occurs in this book published by the Pontifical University Gregoriana in 1948).


1

For Latin terms for concepts that the Ancients (and Medievals) had no notion of, the Vatican is always a good address. There is a lexicon recentis latinitatis issued by the Libraria Editoria Vaticana, although I'm not sure if it will have highly technical terms, for which you may very likely have to coin some of the words yourself. There is a small Italian–...


1

How about meipsum eligo or (more strongly emphasizing the first person) ego meipsum eligo?


3

Somnus means "sleep". Somnium means "dream". One need not be an (ex) linguist to see these words are related, but they are distinct words with different meanings. I suppose you could work with both, but since you explicitly asked for "dream", I would recommend somnium. Now ex is a preposition that always requires the ablative ...


4

To take the Latin first: no. Hoc faciebam would mean "I was making this", as you say, but Hoc feceram would mean "I had made this" - that is, that the making is in the past with respect to a past time; the past time being specified elsewhere in your discourse. So in your particular case, that is going too far. Beyond that, the answer ...


6

Pluperfect refers to "the past of the past": an event that happened before another past event. The usual English translation is "I had made this", as in "I had made this before they stole it". The perfect tense can have two different meanings in Classical Latin: it can either indicate that something's been completed and it's the ...


1

Interestingly both mittere and projicere are found in the Vulgate bible in the famous Joseph story where Joseph is thrown in a pit by his brethren (Gen 37). So on that authority alone I'd say both of your candidates would be sound choices. However, it seems to me that demittere may be also appropriate: to send down; to drop; to let, sink, or bring down; to ...


1

So, the way the construction works is a simple predicate nominative with sum, infinitives are considered neuter singular, ergo. Any word for throw you want will work with the same construction: "X est humanum" X being, iacere, proicere, abicere, contorquere, torquere etc.


7

Indeed, both word orders are fine, although it is more common to put the adjective second. But beware that the two words you have don't have exactly the same meaning as "perfect body" nor do they necessarily make an idiomatic translation: Perfectum is really a participle meaning quite literally "thoroughly done" and often means "...


7

There are a number of words that could work as "refuge". I have added "my" to each so that they are readily useable: perfugium [meum], a place to flee to, a shelter, asylum, refuge refugium [meum], a recourse, a taking refuge, a place of refuge, a refuge, a refuge suffugium [meum], a place beneath which one flies, a shelter, covert, a ...


5

How about "Libertas per Libros." It means "Freedom through(out) Books." There's a bit of alliterative feel with the Li- Li- which is always a plus. You might also try "Libri: Secreti Mei." This means "Books: They are my secret/confidential/mystical (things)" Secretum is an adjective, so you can just make the adjectival ...


4

There are a couple of related words and each has a number of possible forms: confluere, verb, "to flow together" confluo, "I flow together" confluimus, "we flow together" confluens, "flowing together" (a participle) confluendo, "by flowing together" (a gerund) conflux or confluens or confluvium, noun, &...


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