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1

I don't have any strong objections to the answer given by Figulus, but given the characteristic parsimony of the Latin tongue, I'm inclined to think that using participles instead of relative clauses would perhaps be even better, e.g.: Da panem, Domine, esurientibus, et eum habentibus famem iustitiae. I'm curious to hear whether this approach accords ...


1

Da panem, Domine, eis qui esuriunt, et famem iustitiae eis qui panem habent. That seems more natural to me than what you had, Da panem, Domine, quibus ii esuriunt, et famem iustitiae quibus ii panem habent (The are hungry to whom give bread O Lord, and they have bread to whom (give) a hunger for justice.) I don't think it is necessarily wrong to put two ...


3

My suggestion for this purpose is ceterum. See part II.A in the L&S entry for the use of this adverb to introduce something new. The entry in L&S comes with attestations in classical literature. For another kind of example, consider perhaps the most famous unattested phrase of classical Latin: Ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam. There are ...


5

It is up to you whether you use a subordinate clause or a participle construction in Latin. Both is possible! Participle How you use the participle depends a bit on how you word the Latin sentence. I would translate “stepping aside” as alicui decedere, “to give way to someone.” If we do that, it means the subject of the subordinate clause (X came) occurs ...


1

In the 1960s hallucinogenic drugs were referred to as "mind-bending", "mind-altering". Adherents, under the influence ("tripping"), believed that they could fly (a one-way trip), among other fantasies. Here, "bending" could be synonymous with "intoxicating". In Latin, verb "to intoxicate" is given as "(ebrium) reddo", where adjective "ebrius" = drunk; ...


4

The expression in faciem expresses the idea of "man to man" or "face to face", but to emphasize doing so in a manly way, I would use the expression ut vir (or sicut vir), which means "like a man". This phrase can be use with an appropriate verb such as resistere (to resist) or contendere (to contend). Cicero for example wrote the following: Ita et tulit ...


4

The verb flectere is indeed a great choice. The perfect participle stem is flex- (you may find the verb listed as flectō, flectere, flexī, flexus, and you need the last part), so the agent noun is flexor. I'm sure flector will be understood, but is not quite correctly formed. Also, mens is great for "mind" here. As Figulus points out, the genitive is needed ...


4

This is a bit of a stretch, but … Thinking along the lines of ossifragus (bone-breaking), I wonder if maybe you can form a compound adjective. -fragus is weirdly irregular, but there are more regular ways (see section 251). Noting that “-āx denotes a faulty or aggressive tendency,” you could form mentiflectax, -acis. The prefix menti- is derived from mens, ...


3

Welcome to the site! I think you are on the right track, but I would change two details. Instead of mens in the nominative (which is Latin's subject case) I would use mentis, which is an objective genitive, since mind is the object of bending action. I would also use flexor instead of flector, I think that is the more regular formation. So, mentis flexor.


1

A somewhat loose translation, but one which I think captures the sense you're going for, could be: Mihi adsum. One common meaning of adsum is "to be present with one's aid or support; to stand by, to assist, aid, help, protect, defend, sustain". Placing mihi initially can give it some contrastive emphasis, so this sentence can mean "I stand by myself (in ...


0

The phrase, when conjugated the way you have, reads "Choose me, myself!" Your words do accomplish what you're looking for though-- a simple verb conjugation gives us "Ego seligo memet." This means "I choose myself." A short breakdown of the words you chose and their significances: Ego - This is a pronoun meaning "I." In this form, "I" is always the subject ...


2

As Asteroides points out, a predicative noun can freely differ in gender and your suggestion is correct. I want to add that it goes in fact further: in (very) rare cases a predicative adjective can have different gender too. In the Aeneid (4.569–570) you can find the expression varium et mutabile semper femina. It is a complete sentence with an ...


7

The gender of a predicate noun can differ from the gender of the subject There is no problem with a predicate noun having a different gender from the subject. Predicate adjectives are grammatically required to agree with the subject in gender and number, but predicate nouns are not required to agree in either of these categories. In some cases, a noun of a ...


5

I would express "mind" here with animus. Lewis and Short list the meanings "rational soul", "senses", "intellect", "mind", and "memory" in their dictionary. Another option would be mens, but I think the somewhat more emotional nuance of animus is a better fit for this purpose. As ex libris is "from the books", "from the mind" would be ex animo. To make a ...


0

Why the choice of ditio a "less correct form for dicio"? As "quae ... sunt Raetica" means "territories that ... are Raetian", then Raetica should be nominative feminine plural, "Raeticae."


3

Cedere takes the dative, so it should be: Ne apathiae cede, sed humanitati. (Liking this word order better, but yours is fine too, of course.) Other than that, I see no objections. Apathia and humanitas are fine (no false friends); you could also say lentitudo for apathy.


2

I would change your title to "Potens (est) Imperator." This translates as "Powerful/Capable (is) (the) Emperor." I like this translation better because Latin prefers adjectives to genitives (as far as I can tell) and succinctness. As Jasper has answered, "Per Imperium Venit Pax" is a good way of declining your motto.


4

Your title now says '(The) Emperor of (the) Power': it should be 'Potestas Imperatoris'. Your motto now says 'Through (the) Empire I will Come by Peace': it should be 'Per Imperium Venit Pax'.


5

The German–Latin dictionary Neues Latein Lexikon, 1998 edition, offers: aeronavis, is, f (Cited after the Lexicon Latinum Hodiernum. The N.L.L. is supposed to be a translation of the Vatican's Italian–Latin Lexicon Recentis Latinitatis, infamous for its lengthy circumlocutions. The online edition of the latters offers aëria navis, which is more in keeping ...


6

The present active participles are patiens and dolens, so the anglicized words with the omni- prefix would be omnipatient and omnidolent. The former, according to Lexico, has the definition: Having unlimited endurance; infinitely patient. Omnidolent, on the other hand, doesn't appear in any dictionary that I know of. However, the term was used by Samuel ...


2

The Irish word "dún" means a "fort" and has meant that since the Early Irish period as far as I am aware, also Modern Welsh "dinas" means a city (Old Welsh "din"), both the Irish and Welsh words appear in placenames usually suggesting a fort, or fortified hill or promontory. I wonder if the Gaulish word "dunom" generally meant 'fort' too during the Roman ...


6

It depends on the exact word they'd be trying to borrow. Proto-Germanic was spoken in the first centuries CE and the Proto-Germanic word reflected as English dune is reconstructed as *dūnǭ or *dūnaz; the latter would be a straightforward dūnus (compare e.g. rattus 'rat' < PGmc *rattaz), the former likely dūnō (third declension, like sāpō 'soap' < PGmc *...


4

Welcome to the site, and congratulations on choosing an excellent slogan for your school. The second translation does not express the right idea. Cras (“tomorrow”) is an adverb, so it modifies inspirante, not principes, meaning: “Inspiring the leaders tomorrow.” But you are presumably inspring them today. It also seems random that the participle was put in ...


2

Conscientia est actio is grammatically correct, but it means “conscience (or joint knowledge) is action,” which is strange and probably not what you have in mind. Scientia is not a bad choice. Latin has a few more words of this sort: cognitio, notitia, intellegentia, … It can be hard to make out the nuances from dictionary entries alone. What comes in ...


5

The fact that all Romance languages (even Romanian) have borrowed forms of the Germanic "dune" suggests that the Romans did not have a word for it.


1

It is all but meaningless to translate a single word. If your teacher does not think so, ask him or her to translate the English word “have” to Latin, or Spanish, or Chinese, or any other language; it is downright impossible. I will explain in a minute why this is especially true of videre, a seemingly innocuous word which actually has a few surprising ...


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