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1 vote

Is there an adjective for "of eight years, eight years old"?

Just to supplement Sebastian's answer, octoni is the distributive adjective for octo and it means "eight times" or "eight at a time." However, you can indeed use it for age, and it ...
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3 votes
Accepted

Is there an adjective for "of eight years, eight years old"?

The word is octennis. You can say puer octennis – but it's an extremely unusual word and not classical. More common ways to express the idea are: puer octo annos natus – an eight year old boy puer ...
2 votes
Accepted

Help with translating "focused on humans" or "caring about people" from English to Latin?

It is not quite correct, because you cannot use intendere with a direct object in this sense. Also, intendunt means "they intend" as a statement of fact. If you want to mirror semper fidelis ...
2 votes

Need a check for correct english to latin translation(for a tattoo)

I think the subjunctive works better here, almost as a series of prayers. Also, leaving verbs without objects (do, believe) sounds very strange to me. I don't know if it would work as a tattoo, but ...
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3 votes

Translation of "any", "anyone" in a particular context

Very simply, the situation is this: In positive sentences, you say quis, aliquis, quispiam, quivis or quilibet. These all have their adjective forms as well, which are largely the same, but differ ...
-3 votes

Translation of "To seek joy and meaning in life"

Quaerita gaudium/laetitiam et vim in vita! The verb "quaerito" means to seek, to search, to look for earnestly. "Gaudium" is a inward joy. "Laetitiam" is a external joy, ...
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4 votes

"axiology" in Latin

I gather axiology is about the things people value rather than value in the economic sense, so pretium is inappropriate, and while valor is presumably nearer the mark, it is not attested Classically—...
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4 votes

'booklover' in latin

If he's open to borrowing from Greek, as Roman lovers of books did frequently, you could take the attested Greek term φιλόβιβλος (philobiblos) -- ``a lover of books'' -- and Latinize it to philobiblus....
-1 votes

Translation of "any", "anyone" in a particular context

Perhaps quisquam (This tyrant was more hateful than any one of the preceding Tretior hic tyrannus fuit quam q. superiorum)
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-1 votes

"axiology" in Latin

I can't think of any exact match for English's -ology suffix, but, taking a hint from Joonas's studium sapientiae for philosophia (from this link) I'd guess studium valorum or studium pretiorum would ...
  • 3,695
5 votes
Accepted

words meaning girl

Good question. Please first note that your primary source should be a Latin dictionary. As a French guy I use Le Gaffiot, but of course there are others. Some of the words you mention are very rare, ...
2 votes
Accepted

Translation of "the past shall live" into Latin

More idiomatic, I think, would be praeterita exsurgent: "The past (things) will rise up." Singular praeteritum sounds like there's one past thing you have in mind, and exsurgo seems (to me ...
3 votes

'booklover' in latin

I suggest using a compound with -cola, indicating where someone lives or what someone worships or works on. Examples include agricola, caelicola, monticola, Iunonicola, Christicola, silvicola, ...
5 votes

'booklover' in latin

Libris deditus for a man, libris dedita for a woman, literally "devoted to books", but metaphorically a true book aficionado. Found in Cicero, De Oratore 3.82.10.
  • 3,695
4 votes

'booklover' in latin

A booklover is librorum amans or librorum studiosus. If you want, you can also use the superlatives: librorum amantissimus or librorum studiosissimus. Another term (that has gained some currency in ...
1 vote

Transalte "If you can breathe, you can fight"

Here are a couple of different wordings which may be more Latin. But do check with one of the exports here before inking! Dum spiro, pugno While I breathe, I fight Qui spirat, pugnet Whoever breathes, ...
3 votes

How is this translation of "the immutable system engenders rot"?

We can also attempt a somewhat more literal translation. For "system," as in a political system, I would suggest constitutio, which seems like a good fit (unless, in a Neo-Latin context, it ...
5 votes

"Semitic languages" in Classical Latin

As pointed out, the Romans did not have a concept of language families as we understand them today. They did however have a concept of some peoples speaking languages that were similar to or "the ...
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7 votes
Accepted

What are the types of hair in latin?

Straight hair can indeed be called capillus directus, as you can see from this passage in Vitruvius (not necessarily your first stop when looking for hair vocabulary), De Architectura 6, 1.3: Ex eo ...
2 votes
Accepted

How is this translation of "the immutable system engenders rot"?

I think the most Latin way of translating this phrase, even if it means taking a little liberty, is "what doesn't move rots". Putescit quod non movet. You may want to add "et non ...
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16 votes

"Semitic languages" in Classical Latin

While fdb is absolutely correct that the ancient Romans had no conception of language families, we can come up with a plausible calque—a literal translation of each component of a word or phrase. ...
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6 votes

"Semitic languages" in Classical Latin

The ancient Romans had no concept of language families, nor of Semites (the supposed descendants of Noah’s son Shem). There is consequently no word for “Semitic languages” in Classical Latin.
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5 votes

Quid aliud edam?

I've been pondering this for a while, and I turned to Traupman for advice. Under else in the English-to-Latin section of his dictionary, Traupman gives aliquid amplius for anything else. So I'll ...
  • 3,695
5 votes

I would like help with a translation for “remember your purpose” or something similar

Finem tuum memento. This is a variant of Manuel's suggestion. Here finem means "end" in the philosophical sense. The meaning of finis (accusative finem) is given here.
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3 votes

I would like help with a translation for “remember your purpose” or something similar

Memento propositi tui/ Memento propositum tuum "Tene propositum(tuum)" "keep to your purpose"
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0 votes

Translation of 'time' to Latin?

Traupman gives tempus for time and aetas for age, and tempus means more than just a point, it also means a season or a period and quite a few other things: consult your dictionary. Tempus is, as ...
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-1 votes

Translation of 'time' to Latin?

"Aevum" is "eternty" lifetime " "Tempus" describes exactly what you asked.A portion of time, time in general.
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10 votes
Accepted

Use of reflexive pronoun in passive periphrastic constructions

Suus rex omni reginae placet to quote Plautus, "Every queen likes her own king." The first year Latin textbooks won't teach this to students, because then they'd all wind up overusing se and ...
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3 votes

What is the best translation for "livestreaming"?

Perhaps "transmissio directa" "Imagine vivida"
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