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Ignis Venturis est. - Fire is coming. Ecce Ignis. - Here is fire. Ad nimium venturis est. - Drought is coming. Ecce Ossa - Here are bones. Et pulvis resurget, - The dust rises, et nostras caelum obscuratur. - and our sky is obscured. Inundationes veniet. - Floods will come. Sentire aquas. - Feel the waters. Gelida flumina et influunt, - Frozen ...


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I apologize if this comes across as a non-answer, but I cannot help giving it. I have translated several songs into Latin for professional singers. Good translations take a lot of work: I make sure the singer is comfortable with the translation. I add or remove syllables or avoid words they find awkward for some reason. I make the rhyme, alliteration, and ...


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On the other hand, it is perfectly classical Latin to use a proper noun and a common noun in apposition as in “urbs Roma”. If you want to take “Crater” as the English name of the lake you can write “lacus Crater”.


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In addition to Nickimite's fine examples, there is also: fructus caliginis "fruits of darkness" (deep darkness, with a vague connotation of being in a dark nebula; gloom, blindness, calamity) fructus obscuri "fruits of darkness" (the dark, with a vague connotation of darkness covering the world from one's vision; the hidden, unknown) I think obscuri is ...


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I was thinking along the same lines as Nickimite. The first sentence of Sallust's De coniuratione Catilinae says: omneis homines, qui sese student praestare ceteris animalibus, summa ope niti decet, ne vitam silentio transeant veluti pecora, quae natura prona atque ventri oboedientia finxit. 'It's fitting that all humans who are eager to stand above ...


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Ultio is indeed good for "revenge". The wordings that more literally match "everything is revenge" sound a little awkward to me, so I suggest instead: Nihil nisi ultio. Nothing but revenge. This sounds like proper Latin and seems to get the same message across. You can also add a verb to both languages (or just English and leave it implicit in Latin): ...


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If you want to say that humankind doesn't go above other creatures, a good translation would be Homo omnia non superat. "Man does not conquer all things"


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For "no virtue" as in "there is no virtue", the phrase nulla virtus is great. The harder decision is what to follow it with. The only grammatical one of your suggestions is in homine, "in human". That would amount to "[there is] no virtue in a human". If that matches your intention, you can go with that. The options in humanum and in homines don't work. If ...


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There's a few ways to translate this. I am ignorant of the nuances, but here's my best understanding based off of minor Googling and Whitaker's Words. Fructus Tenebrarum = The fruit/benefit/reward of darkness. Fructus Obscuritatis = The fruit/benefit/reward of blindness/darkness/lack of understanding. Fructus Crepesculi = The fruit/benefit/reward of ...


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Yes, Lewis and Short supports this use. [most, or very] dear, precious, valued, esteemed, beloved: (Show lexicon entry in Lewis & Short Elem. Lewis) (search) It quotes Vergil, Lucretius and Cicero describing mater,pater; genitor, genetrix; and parentes as carissima, carissimus, and, for both parents together carissimi.


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I'm only at an intermediate level of Latin, but I thought I'd make an attempt to express your request. Maybe there's something here you can use—or an error here that someone will catch. Here's a more prosaic version: Lectiones praescriptas legere potui ultraque cupio. Dabisne mihi plures lectiones itaque plura puncta meream? And here's a more histrionic ...


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"The past shall live" implies that it is currently dead; awaiting, presumably, a resurrection. How about present tense, vivit, as in historia vivit = history lives. The sense, the past segues into the future at a "junction" called the present; therefore, both "live" in the present. Alternatively, there is no present, just a perpetual transition between past/ ...


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Yes! Acta Diurna! A quick note from Lewis and Short: B. acta publĭca , or absol.: acta , ōrum, n., the register of public acts, records, journal. Julius Cæsar, in his consulship, ordered that the doings of the Senate (diurna acta) should be made public, Suet. Caes. 20; cf. Ernest. Exc. 1; “but Augustus again prohibited it,” Suet. Aug. 36. Still the acts ...


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Before Gutenberg's printing press, the concept of a "newsletter" didn't really exist—producing dozens of written copies of weekly announcements just wasn't cost-effective for your average citizen. So the best option will probably be an analogy. Nūntius can mean either an envoy, a courier, or a message delivered by a courier. In the plural, nūntiī, it can ...


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Ars servabit me fac This means, literally, "art will save me—make!". I would remove the "make!" (fac), but the rest is pretty good. If you want it a bit more idiomatic: The most natural Latin word order would be ars mē servābit (though no order is wrong, per se) If you want it to sound more like a motto, you can reduce it to ars servat: "art saves [people]...


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That sounds perfectly fine to me. You are correct about the genitive. An alternative could be Lacus Craterae; for both crater and cratera exist, with the same meaning, which includes the drinking-vessel and a volcanic crater. It is conceivable that the Romans might have used an adjective, like ?craterius or similar, but I have not found actual use of this. ...


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A good way to phrase "in his absence" is the absolute ablative eo absente. It can mean all kinds of things like "when/because/if he is absent", much like the English phrase. There is a separate feminine version if you need her absence: ea absente. The phrase "Where is X?" is simple: Ubi est X? Now just put X = Deus.


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Coram is a good word to use; it's classy. cōram, adv. and prep. (Lewis and Short) I. in the presence of, before the eyes of, in the face of, before. coram populo, Hor. A. P. 185 "in the presence of the people." coram judicibus, Suet. Aug. 56 "before the judges"


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A good general word for business is res, so "public business" could well be translated as res publica. But bear in mind that it also means "republic" (which is indeed a public business but in a very specific sense), so there is a risk of misinterpretation. Perhaps something like negotium could also work for "business", but that depends on context. Even in ...


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I agree with GDR. What you need is "res publica" in its original sense of "public business". In the spirit of Roman conciseness perhaps better: Res publica publice agenda.


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