New answers tagged

2

I'd go for caveat responsor to keep as much of the original grammar as possible and get the meaning you want. Responsor is literally the one that answers or replies.


2

Laudator temporis acti, from Horace's Ars Poetica (line 173), "a praiser of times past," might not be what you want, since the intended meaning is pejorative, but I offer it here because whatever phrase you do settle on should be chosen with knowledge of this phrase and the meanings it carries. Multa senem circumveniunt incommoda, vel quod quaerit ...


3

It may not be a full sentence but there's an implied subject and verb all the same, and I feel it's something like "a healing force flows". In that case, the subject is not the referent of the possessive pronoun, so you should indeed use a form of is, but probably not the ablative: e manibus eis means "from these hands". That may be ...


1

The phrases used in Scholastic latin to convey something like "bear in mind", "take note" et sim. are e.g. the following (in late Latin freely with "quod" rather than acc+inf): Adverte... (as in: "Adverte tamen..." "But note that..." Advertendum est... ("One should be aware that..." Nota... ("...


2

There are various possibilities depending on the required shade of meaning (in Latin, you must be very specific!): carissimus (dearest, the one most valued) dilectissimus (the most beloved) gratissimus (the one most liked or enjoyed, the most agreeable) iucundissimus (the one giving most pleasure) and probably many others. So e.g.: "Roma est mihi ...


2

The form you wrote has errors in agreement of both case and gender. Ars intrepida would be the nominative form since ars is feminine. If you really want accusative, it would be artem intrepidam. It is unclear to me whether intrepidus -a -um is really the adjective you want, though.


2

In the first example ("By planting more trees"), the verbal noun planting takes a direct object in the accusative, for which A&G notes we should rather use the gerundive: The gerund with a direct object is practically limited to the genitive and the ablative (without a preposition); even in these cases the gerundive is commoner. As noted in ...


0

Or, as Sir Winston Churchill once said of his rival Sir Stafford Cripps, "There, but for the grace of God, goes God."


2

A literal translation is straightforward enough: Es fidelis regio in te ipse et es fidelis terrae. N.B. that es is a 2nd person singular imperative here, and that regio is the dative of regium (I interpreted royal as a general royal quality, not as if the person addressed is literally a member of the royal family; fidelis takes either the dative or in + ...


1

The most obvious verb to use seems to me to be permutare, which can very literally mean to transform completely or to turn about, but also to exchange or swap. Its attendant noun is permutatio. Depending on what you mean exactly I could envision constructions with transponere or some of the various verbs associated with commerce, like cambire (which is not ...


3

"Semper vicit" means "he/she has always won/conquered" (with a perfective rather than a habitual aspect). "Vicit" is the 3rd person active indicative perfect of vincere, a verb. "Victorious", the adjective, is victoriosus. In the feminine (nominative singular), that's victoriosa. Your phrase can be translated as semper ...


4

A literal translation would be: Delige humanitatem. (One might also say elige. Döderlein's Handbook of Latin Synonyms opines: “Deligere means to choose, in the sense of not remaining undecided in one’s choice; eligere, to choose, in the sense of not taking the first thing that comes.” Make of that what you will …) I am also partial to saying: Adhibe ...


2

What you have here are the "right" words, as in words picked correctly from a dictionary, but the grammar and meaning are all garbled. A translation into English would be "Hope is best. Prepare! [He's] the worst. You shall expect [an] unexpected [thing]." That's presumably not what you want. A better translation would be optima spera, ad ...


8

Memini can take either an accusative or a genitive, and there is a difference in meaning, but you're presumably modelling this on "memento mori", so let's use an accusative (mori may not particularly look like an accusative but it's an infinitive and infinitives are neuter so the nominative and accusative are identical). Memento is obviously fine: ...


4

You give a valuable hint when saying you want this engraved on a whisky glass. Whisky is derived from Irish uisce beatha, which means water of life. This translates into Latin as aqua vitae, which is still recognisable in Danish akvavit. If we replace reason with occasion (occasio), and we modify aqua into aquae because it has to be a dative, we're there: ...


3

As denarius is a specific coin and and atterere only means destroying in the sense of rubbing, attero denarios would mean primarily something like "I rub dimes against each other" and can be stretched to "I ruin dimes by rubbing them". In order to give an impression of the tone, I translated denarius to "dime" just because they ...


6

Translating as semper est bibendum could make a recognizable variant on Horace's famous nunc est bibendum, "now is the time to drink" (Ode 1.37).


3

Maybe, "semper est causa ad bibendum."


6

At first I also thought this was a basic question, but I think it is actually not that easy to answer. Let us first look at your suggestions. I am afraid the answer to your question: “Am I off by miles?” is yes. You are on the right path with the three words mors, malus and memoria but beyond that, frankly, the sentences look like a leisurely but somewhat ...


3

Ex diariis is correct, although diarium usually means "daily ration/allowance" and seems to have been used in the sense of a "diary" only rarely. A more classical expression for "diary, journal" may be commentarii diurni (daily notebook), so you could say: ex commentariis diurnis (or diurnis commentariis, whichever you prefer).


2

Simplest possible version: Meus sum. / Mea sum. -- depending on whether "I" is male or female.


3

Your translation is actually almost perfect. The only small issue is that autem "however" never stands first in its clause; it would be better replaced with sed or at, both of which mean "but". The reason there are two infinitives in a row is that one way of expressing a negative command is noli plus infinitive, and in this case that ...


1

Picking up the brush for a first sketch. Sunt nomina verba vana volatiliaque. An immediate association I had when reading the question was with the first words spoken by Jorge of Burgos in Umberto Eco's "The Name of the Rose": Verba vana aut risui apta non loqui. They come from the Regula Benedicti, capitula IV - Quae sunt instrumenta bonorum ...


9

I'm not aware of an existing Latin idiom with the same meaning, so I'll translate instead. The offered translation is nonsense; it has a cow, a shop, and China (the country!) but the syntax makes no sense. Let me start with vocabulary: The typical word for a bull is bos. Figlina means a potter's workshop or a pottery. See L&S for more meanings; this is ...


2

I would say fugio is a better choice than evado.


1

To remove potential ambiguities you could try: "numquam memoria excides." = (literally) "You will never fall out of memory." = "You will never be forgotten." Alternatively, using the infinitive of "excido": "numquam memoria excidere." = "Never to be forgotten." (An active verb translated passively.)


6

It helps that differential calculus was invented at a time when mathematical works were still regularly published in Latin. From Leonhard Euler's Institutiones Calculi Differentialis (1755), caput IV, p. 115 (PDF): Ex voce autem differentialis, qua differentia infinite parua denotatur, alia nomina deriuantur, quae vsu sunt recepta. Sic verbum habetur ...


0

'Remembered' is a past particle. One way to translate 'to remember' is 'memorare'. I would go with a particle perfect passive, as it is a person who is being remembered, but I'm not really sure about this. Maybe someone else can give a better alternative for the verb form. So the translation would then be: Semper memorato


10

If you want to indicate that a differing opinion or a criticism is not intended as a personal attack (which is what I interpret the phrase “with all due respect” to mean), a common phrase is: bona venia tua dixerim I'd like to say with your gracious permission Likewise you can also say: pace tua dixerim I'd like to say without disturbing your peace i.e.: ...


0

"I escape" is one correct translation of "evado". One can put "ego" before "evado", to stress the first person.


6

The ut follows ea lege: ea lege, ut … under the condition that … The key is to question what ea lege is doing in that sentence, especially since there is no context talking about some legislation or other. Lex can occasionally be used with ut + subjunctive (e.g. lex erat apud Romanos, ut …, the Romans had a law stipulating that …). So an overly literal ...


2

In this case ita and ut are unrelated. There is a construction ita…ut, but it is not used here. You can drop the intensifier "so" or ita and the sentence works equally well. (The emphasis is good to have, but not strictly necessary.) The suggestion from the book is unnecessarily complicated. One might even argue that it has two elements reversed by ...


2

Your translation makes perfect sense, and it captures the English meaning very well. I would perhaps use the phrase "in perpetua" instead of semper. It has a "into forever" idea rather than an "always" idea. That being said, I have read a poem that ended "Semper, frater, ave atque vale" where semper was used in a ...


1

The English phrase was popularised by Foxe's Book of Martyrs, sp. John Bradford. The Latin is good, perhaps a little ponderous, except that 'sine' is probably a typo for 'sinon.' "Huc et illuc," Hither and thither, used by Cicero. Illuc In that diection. Sinon Dei gratia, If not for the Grace of God. Vadam could be a future indicative "I shall ...


1

Not so much a complete answer, but several points to consider. I think the word perfectus usually has the connotation of something completed/finished/done, and somewhat less in the sense of whole/pure/without-blemish; For the latter sense the adjective integer is perhaps closer. I didn't find a good one-word-match for imperfect (corruptus sounds too strong ...


9

I would suggest vas, -is, which has the somewhat unusual plural vasa, -orum. The first thing I thought of when I heard the word "vessel" was II Corinthians 4:7. Here, St. Paul speaks of how an immaterial gift ("the light of the knowledge of God's glory") is received in our fragile bodies: But we have this treasure in earthen vessels, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included