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4

Ἀστρεκδημίας αἰών : Astrekdemias aeon. (Means the age of out-travel to the stars.) Ἀστροκατασκοπῆς αἰών: Astrokataskopes aeon. (Means the age of star-muster ... the same word used for spying and inspection, though.) You may transpose the Eon before the qualifier, if you wish.


8

I'd go with stella secunda myself. The main words for "star" are stēlla, astēr, astrum, and sīdus, with astēr and astrum being borrowings from Greek (and the latter especially being poetic/pretentious) and sīdus primarily meaning "constellation"; stēlla is native, and also the word that survived into the Romance languages, so it strikes ...


5

I would say: Astrum posterum In contrast with proximus, which is often taken in the sense of "near", posterus means coming after, following, next, ensuing, subsequent As @Cairnarvon mentioned, posterus can mean "inferior" (it only means "last" in its superlative form, so that's irrelevant), but the same is true of secundus, ...


9

There's an already nice construction in Latin: memento mori, which more literally means "remember to die", though it really means something like "don't forget that you're mortal." Substituting one word for another we get: memento ignoscere, "Remember to forgive."


12

According to the Vatican's Lexicon Recentis Latinitatis, parvum verborum novatorum Léxicum: mercato nero [Italian]     mercatūra clandestīna [Latin]


5

One way to express that would be: Omnia possibilia sunt. All things are possible. This actually comes from the Vulgate, where Jesus said: Apud homines hoc inpossibile est, apud Deum autem omnia possibilia sunt. (Mateus 19:26) With men this is impossible; with God, however, all things are possible. Everything vs. anything: Concerning your comment about ...


4

Another option is to use aliquatenus. According to L&S (II) it can mean "To a certain degree" and "in some respects" So as it seems to remark the restrictive flavor, I may say aliquatenus is indeed a good fit here, but maybe only aliquatenus-ly so. Philistus,... ut multo inferior, ita aliquatenus lucidior (Philistus, as he was ...


5

First, there is no universal "Latin". Each era, or even each author, has their own style of Latin. According to Wikipedia, quantifiers ("for all" and "there exists") first appeared in the 4th century BC. One of the notable works on this matter is De Interpretatione, composed by Aristotle, and translated into Latin in the 6th ...


4

The metaphorical way I learned was 'In ense et aratro' which means with sword and plough, to show war and peace.


4

Why not go for an actual Classical quote? Try Terence, Eunuch II.iii.305-306: egone? nescio hercle, neque unde eam, neque quorsum eam: ita prorsum oblitus sum mei. Me? I don't know, by Hercules, neither whence I come nor whither I go: I have thus been so completely lost in thought.


4

I would take a fairly straightforward approach: Volens verum distractus, oblitus sum. That means: Willing but (in truth) distracted, I forgot.


4

My suggestion is: propositum (e) memoria mihi districto excidit. The parentheses mark an optional word. Very literally, this means something like 'The thing that had been set before me as an intention or objective fell out of memory for me having been distracted.' More loosely, it means 'What I was planning to do slipped my mind because I got distracted.' ...


3

Since the verb exonerare is used in a passage of Q. Curtius Rufus (Historiae Alexandri Magni 6.8.12) to describe unburdening one's conscience, it follows that onerare is one verb that could be used of the opposite. I tend to think that sentiments like this work somewhat better in the negative in Latin. nihil quod oneret conscientiam faciunt homines. Humans ...


6

An extremely common term in medieval Latin, often used in a philosophical context, is secundum quid, i.e. "with respect to something." Obviously, secundum is used as a preposition here. It is usually contrasted with something that exists per se, i.e. "in itself," or simpliciter, i.e. "simply speaking." You can find hundreds of ...


6

Without more context, it's difficult to know precisely what you need to say. However, quodam modo means "in a certain manner", which could correspond to "in a certain respect" depending on context. Similarly you could use quadam ratione.


8

First of all, umbra must be in the accusative case, so it has to be umbram iaciam. As to the correctness of the phrase, it is in fact classical: Lewis & Short have meaning I.B.5. of iacio as "To project as a shadow" giving the reference “nullam umbram,” Plin. 2, 73, 75, § 183 sq.


4

'X friends', in English, I think can reasonably be reinterpreted as 'friends from X', and this suggests the Latin amici de foro, amici a foro or amici e foro. I'll leave it to someone with a little more knowledge of the three different prepositions to suggest which fits best here. Using an adjective seems wrong to me, since being related to the forum isn't a ...


-2

The following words all have the sense of persevering or pushing forwards: persevero persto persisto insisto nitor So any of these can be used. The word deficio mean to give up. So you can say: Noli defice Which means "Don't giveup." The Romans often used the word cedo in this context, so we have: Cede nullis. (Yield to nothing) Ne cede. (Do not ...


14

This isn't the royal "we", but is closest to what today is called plūrālis modestiae is Latin, the author's "we" in English. As Joonas mentions in the comments, this is an established feature of pan-European scientific style, and no surprise - it's got there from Latin, but in the process got reinterpreted in tone and style (just as ...


4

It's not true that the order of words could be anything any more than it's true that "Time flies like an arrow" could be understood in all the 11 different interpretations that one can read into it. Latin is a language that has a syntax that is connected with intonation - it's not some unconnected jumbling of piecemeal English translations that can ...


3

It is a good translation, but it is also true that the Latin sentence can be translated back in various ways. The daughter of the forest loves the waters of the farmer The daughter of the farmer of the forest loves the waters The daughter loves the waters of the farmer of the forest The daughter loves the waters of the forest of the farmer If you want a ...


3

Reading Plautus is a great way to learn colloquial Latin. All my examples below are from plays such as Miles Gloriosus. The Romans did not say "good morning". Heus! is what you say when you call out to somebody Hello! Quid agis? is a normal casual greeting, "How are you doing?" Quid fit? is another casual greeting, "How goes it?"...


9

If you want something analogous to another phrase, you can edit your question to provide the original Latin one to be varied. Adapting a single word would be easy. Without any context, a decent translation would be: Quid faceret Caesar? The imperfect conjunctive is used for conditions that you know never to be realized, and that indeed seems to be the case: ...


7

Noli would not be appropriate, because negative requests with noli are pointedly polite. An exhortation to keep at it and not give up is direct and to the point, not polite; just like you don't say: “May I ask that you not give up” in English either. So ne it is. The following verb should be in the perfect subjunctive. (Another option would be cave, but ...


10

I myself have wondered about this on numerous occasions, and here's what I've learned: There were no separate greetings for different times of day in ancient Rome, unlike in modern European languages. The universal greeting salvē "be well!", or the more bombastic havĕ (from Punic ḥave "live!" - don't get fooled by the common spelling avē)...


2

The problem with carmina is that it specifically refers to sung verse - first Saturnian verse and then hexameters - with connotations of ritual and mystery about it. It can also refer to popular verse like English limericks and Russian часту́шки. It does not, however, refer to instrumental music - that is referred to with modī or mūsica or modī mūsicī. ...


3

There seems to be a mild allusion here to Matthew 7.3. The word there for the “log” (in one’s own eye) is trabs; the splinter in the eye of the other is a festuca. There are a few options for the so-called negative imperative (“don’t”), one I often like is ne + perfect subjunctive. So perhaps Ne acceperis trabem sub cutem tuam alternatively Ne siveris [...


5

Others have suggested many ways to express falling in love in Latin. Let me address the grammar of your suggestion, even though it was too literal as a translation. There is only one problem, but it occurs twice. Pay attention to which case is needed with each preposition: Cum requires the ablative. Both haec and lingua need to be in this case: hac lingua. ...


5

A less literal (but perhaps more idiomatic) proposal: Amore huius linguae accendor (“I am ablaze with love for this language!”). Or, slightly less hot perhaps: Studium eius linguae me excitat (“The interest for [love of] this language excites me,” i.e. “I am very much interested in, I love this language”).


6

Although the inchoative suffix -sc- is productive, I would advise against using it in everyday speech unless the verb is already a common one. I could say "pugnasco" (unattested) or "puellasco" (a couple usages), but it would call attention to itself in a way that doesn't seem fitting for the phrase "falling in love." Since I ...


8

Oxford [English-to-Latin section (under "fall")], offers "adamo" = "to fall in love with", taking the accusative case. (In the Latin-to-English the definition of "adamo" is "to love passionately". I am always suspicious when the two sections fail to coincide.) Lewis & Short gives "to love truly, ...


10

Latin has an inchoative suffix -sc- which indicates that a certain state is beginning, and which is quite productive (rubesco, senesco, reconvalesco, ...). And indeed, there is the verb amasco – "to begin to love", so that you could say hanc linguam amasco


4

In this case, and in many other cases, the details of obstare are given in a subordinate clause. That subordinate clause, introduced here by quominus, has bellum as its subject. But the grammatical role of bellum could be anything, depending on how the subordinate clause is put together, and this has nothing to do with obstare. Bellum is not an object of ...


2

My preference would be 'cantus', "singing/playing," so "music," rather than 'carmina' ("songs"). I can't help feeling a somewhat negative connotation with 'vulgaris', so my preference is with 'cantus popularis', though 'vulgaris' is obviously fine.


13

"Folk music" as a category is a very recent concept, so we're not going to find an attested term in the Classical corpus and will have to come up with our own. We can dismiss pleb musicorum out of hand: pleb isn't a Latin word, and even if it were the phrase would mean "[pleb] of musicians". Paganus means "rural" or "rustic&...


0

Fortuna (the goddess) favors the daring. The capitalization of the F is not a mere oversight. It is to distinguish between the goddess Fortuna, and the concept of fortune.


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