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Etymology of exostra/ἐξώστρα

Yes, it comes from ἐξ + ὠθέω. The suffix is -trā, which forms nouns with usually but not always instrumental meanings. (It's related to the more common instrumental suffix -tron, and in fact in ...
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Plato's Phaedo - a syntax question

The syntax of the subordinate question is actually different from your rearrangement, in a way that can be hard to grasp for speakers of languages (like English) that lack that particular syntax. It ...
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Greek quote source

The line is, in fact: Τα γ’αριστα ουδεν ημιν αμεινονα It would seem that, somewhere along the line, it has been transcribed incorrectly. I can just imagine a harried reporter hearing the line and ...
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5 votes

Greek quote source

The Wiki article on the school has nothing on the second half of the phrase, and searching yields nothing. The closest I got is an English motto—"Nothing but the Best"—which I found in an AP ...
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8 votes
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Use of lunate sigma in scholarly editions

I don't have an exact chronology down, but it is indeed something that Oxford has been doing with their newer OCTs. I first noticed it in Merkelbach/West's edition of the Fragmenta Hesiodea, which was ...
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7 votes

Horace quotes a Greek proverb in Ars Poetica, what does it mean?

cnread has already ably translated the proverb but I wanted to unpack Brink’s observation that “one might note however that the proverb makes better sense in Lucian's context than in H's and Lucian ...
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Horace quotes a Greek proverb in Ars Poetica, what does it mean?

The Greek proverb is very straightforward: ὤδινεν ὄρος, εἶτα μυν­ ἀπέτεκεν A mountain is in labor, then gives birth to a mouse. As your commentary notes, Horace transposed it into the future. The ...
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