New answers tagged

1

I'll take a shot at this, although others whose Greek is stronger could probably do a more reliable job. The verb ἅπτω has an active form and a mediopassive form. In ancient Greek, the semantic distinction between these two is not always the one you would imagine based on the English usage of passive verbs. Often they just mean different things or convey ...


4

Πρόγραμμα is probably as good a candidate as any can be, http://stephanus.tlg.uci.edu/lsj/#eid=89478 (LSJ at TLG). Also, Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek (2015) has a meaning for Πρόγραμμα of 'that which is written first, order of the day' as per Demosthenes' and Aristotle's corpora; and the Cambridge Greek Lexicon (2021) defines it at programme of business,...


4

Though Gaffiot claims the adjective eugenēus is borrowed from Greek εὐγένειος, I find that hard to accept on semantic grounds: εὐγένειος means 'well-bearded' (in the case of men) or 'well-maned' (in the case of lions), not 'well-bred'. I (and Lewis & Short with me) think it much more likely it was instead derived from εὐγενής, which means the same thing ...


3

Very crudely, in the Attic lunisolar calendar, the day belongs to the month (in Genitive, possessive), and word order is not important. So, Ἑκατομβαιῶνος δευτέρα μεσοῦντος and δευτέρα μεσοῦντος Ἑκατομβαιῶνος are equivalent. It's like "July's 3rd day of waxing" or else the 3rd day of July. The system is sort of as in English, at first, all the ...


9

The closest Greek equivalent to a Latin gerundive is one of the verbal adjectives ending in -τέος (formed on the aorist passive stem). Both ποιέω and πράττω – unlike ἄγω, as you note – are generally equivalent in sense to Latin ago when it means 'to do.' Therefore, the corresponding equivalents to the neuter plural gerundive agenda would be τὰ ποιητέα and τὰ ...


Top 50 recent answers are included