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1

I've just started researching the topic because of your question, so this post is very much a work in progress and should not be treated as a definite answer, just a collection of information that I've come across that I think may be relevant. My impression so far is that examples exist, but not enough to make clear generalizations. A two-word phrase can ...


1

The closest thing to a Latin dictionary along the lines of the OED that I know of is the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae. But it is not finished yet, and not likely to be finished for quite some time.


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The transaction's essential things Essentiālia negōtiī transactions' essential things Essentiālia negōtiōrum essential things of the transaction Essentiālia negōtiī essential things of the transactions Essentiālia negōtiōrum negōtia essentiālia trānsāctiōnis "Essential affairs of the transaction" negōtia essentiālia trānsāctiōnum "...


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EDIT: Note that this answer applies to an earlier version of the question; see the revision history for details. The genitive in (Classical) Latin is, in fact, never accompanied by an article—because Latin has no articles at all! Like in (Ancient) Greek, the Latin genitive is marked by a special ending on nouns and adjectives. This ending varies by ...


8

The prosaic word order in Latin—that is, the ordinary, normal, unremarkable word order—goes like this:       noun modifier The noun comes first, and the modifier comes right after. The modifier can be any of: an adjective, as in canis ruber (a red dog); a noun in the genitive case, as in canis Georgii (George's dog); (rarely) a noun in the same case, as ...


2

To answer the question from the title, after is somewhat more common than before, but both are perfectly acceptable. Most authors choose the order based on what sounds better, or what they want to emphasize. (Putting the adjective first puts more emphasis on it.) To answer the question from the body, though: syntactically, there are no adjectives in this ...


1

I couldn't find any city names in specific, though this Wikipedia article on Rapidum mentions a road named Nova Praetentura that had the name in the first century C.E. Constantine also named Constantinople Nova Roma, although this was the 4th century and Constantine, so I'm not sure if you could consider it Roman in the classic sense. It also wasn't ever ...


4

What's the closest word Classical Latin (Greek?) would have used for mobile machines, even if they don't have a human shape? (NB: this answer is adapted slightly from another answer I gave here) I think perhaps automaton or automatum. I’m not aware of any Roman writings on robots as such, whereas the Greeks wrote surprisingly frequently about robot-like ...


4

The word was invented by Karel Capek's brother in 1920 and used in his novel (in Czech), of which the title is translated into English as 'Rossum's Universal Robots'. It suggests (forced) labour robota and related words in Slavic languages (e.g. Russian robotnik, 'worker'). The Romans adopted plenty of foreign words quite without shame, for simple ...


4

Smith & Hall give a fairly clear and thorough explanation in 'A Copious and Critical English-Latin Dictionary', under the headword 'Heart' (page 307), section III, which begins as follows : The Heart as the seat of the emotions: 1. pectus, -oris, n. : to love one's friend with the whole h., amicum toto p. [ut dicitur] amare, Cic. Leg. I, 18, 49 : Virg. :...


4

Some of the early chapters in Roma Aeterna, Book II of Hans Ørberg's Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata, contain simplified prose versions of sections of the Aeneid. They're part of Ørberg's method of gradually introducing vocabulary and grammar entirely in Latin, with no translation to your native language, so you pick everything up from context. I happen to ...


7

As far as I can see, your basic premise is doubtful, inasmuch as classical sources appear to have defined virgo in the same way as has been done down to modern times. Certainly, the word was then applied to girls, young women and various males, but generally implying maidenhood, sc. an absence of sexual experience. There are plenty of examples. Cicero has a ...


0

This is a question that is well answered by looking at an online Latin dictionary. The noun decimatio is listed as meaning "the taking of a tenth", including the punishment you refer to. This noun is derived from the verb decimare, "to take the tenth" or "to decimate". See the linked entries for more details. This verb appears to come from the ordinal ...


1

Decimo and decimatio always refer to one tenth in Latin. Careful English stylists also use "decimate" in this sense only.


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