Skip to main content
49 votes
Accepted

Why is the Roman acronym SPQR and not SPR?

It appears that -que was treated much like a word. Especially Ovidius does not treat it as an enclitic, but more as an independent word. This becomes evident in quotes, where -que is outside the quote ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
21 votes
Accepted

Are the two cums related?

The similarity is a coincidence; these words are unrelated. Etymological dictionaries such as De Vaan's give the following account of the two words: The earlier form of the conjunction cum is quom; ...
TKR's user avatar
  • 31.3k
17 votes

Why is the Roman acronym SPQR and not SPR?

The consensus seems to be that SPQR means Senatus Populusque Romanus, but there is also the theory that SPQR did not mean Senatus Populusque Romanus. It could also may have been Senatus Populus ...
intrigus's user avatar
  • 361
14 votes
Accepted

Why "dilatasti" instead of "dilatavisti" in Psalm 4:2?

This is a contracted perfect form, which is fairly common in poetry, particularly in the first conjugation. Basically, whenever you have a second person perfect active ending in -āvisti (like ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.6k
13 votes
Accepted

Can you place "et" inside a prepositional phrase?

An alternative way to phrase the question is to ask whether a preposition should be repeated after et. I went through a book for all the examples of et used with prepositions in a way that would allow ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
12 votes
Accepted

Translation of “in” as “and”

The passage comes from Cic. Fam. 9.4, namely from a letter to Varro. Apparently others have translated as you would expect: If you have a garden in your library, everything will be complete (...
Rafael's user avatar
  • 11.5k
11 votes

Can -que be attached to a word ending in -que?

I searched through plausible forms (particularly adverbial forms of adjectives ending in -quus) and only found one example: Aequeque in rebus minoribus socium fallere turpissimum est aequeque turpe ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.5k
11 votes
Accepted

Is the -que in quinque at all related to the conjunction -que?

None, and here's why. Meaning If you look at -que cognates (Hittite -kku 'now, even, and'; Sanskrit -ca 'and'; Greek Gr. -τε 'and' etc.), you will see that the meaning is virtually the same (and). ...
Alex B.'s user avatar
  • 11.7k
10 votes

Why is the Roman acronym SPQR and not SPR?

The source referenced in a Wikipedia-entry: SPQR är en förkortning för Senatus Populusque Romanus, [se'na:tus popu'luskwe ro'ma:nus], vilket betyder "senaten och det romerska folket". Eller ...
Yeti's user avatar
  • 201
9 votes
Accepted

A list of the categories and subcategories of the Latin conjunctions

Here is the stub of an answer. Many conjunctions can be used in two or more different ways. And I've only given an example for each category, not an exhaustive list. But this should be enough for you ...
Cerberus's user avatar
  • 20k
9 votes
Accepted

Where to put the enclitic -ne?

Your idea is correct. Lewis-Short is not terribly clear: added in a direct question, as an interrogation mark, to the first or principal word of the clause but, if you know German, Georges is ...
Dario's user avatar
  • 3,246
9 votes

How do you say on the one hand ... on the other hand?

.A. If there is a contrast of 'activity,' use hīc, illic; for example ‘to go or to stay,’ hīc abire, illic manere. If there is a contrast of ‘groups’ then hic, haec, hoc, and ille, illa, illud, as ...
Hugh's user avatar
  • 8,693
9 votes
Accepted

Positioning 'quoque' in the sentence

I would give two main rules for positioning quoque: It comes right after the word it comments on. If several people are angry and Iulius is one of them, then Iulius quoque iratus est. If Iulius has ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

How did velle give rise to vel?

The interpretation of the origin of vel from a second person indicative of volo is proved by the comparison with the Umbrian "heris - heris", 2. pers. from *herio = volo (Hofmann – Szantyr p. 501). ...
qwertxyz's user avatar
  • 2,906
8 votes
Accepted

Can -c replace -que in other words than atque and neque?

I wrote a longish post attempting a negative answer, and as a last precaution consulted a list of all Latin words ending in -c. One word stuck out to me like a sore thumb, and further research ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.5k
8 votes
Accepted

What is the difference between "ac" (or "atque") and "et"?

Atque, according to L&S, means a copulative particle, and also, and besides, and even, and According to Bennett's New Latin Grammar ch. 6 §"Coordinate Conjunctions", "atque is used before ...
Geremia's user avatar
  • 3,694
8 votes
Accepted

Two levels of 'and'

From the beginning of Plautus's Amphitruo (so a bit pre-Classical), spoken by Mercurius, god of messages and commerce: Ut vos in vostris voltis mercimoniis emundis vendundisque me laetum lucris ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.6k
8 votes
Accepted

The conjunction "autem" expressing indignation or surprise in questions and exclamations

I would translate autem here as "too" or "even". Aristophontes here is shocked that Hegio seems to be believing Tyndarus's lies: "what, even you? You believe this too?" ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.6k
7 votes
Accepted

Fieri potest with final ut or explicative quod

I've never seen fieri potest, quod. I find however several examples of fieri potest, ut subjunctive in the corpora; the first two are: Si hoc fieri potest ut in hac civitate quae longe iure ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
  • 16.5k
7 votes

Are "-que" and "et" equivalent?

James Kingsbery's answer is exactly correct. If two things "belong" together, then -que is appropriate. If you were going shopping, you might be asked to pick up ova butyrumque ("eggs and butter"), ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
  • 16.5k
7 votes
Accepted

Why does "ut" mean such different things when it has a subjunctive verb vs. an indicative one?

Well, I think the thing to do is to remember that, while ut has three different English meanings, it has only one Latin meaning and three uses. A Latin speaker might just as easily ask, "Why does ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
  • 16.5k
7 votes
Accepted

The logical "then"

Option 1: sequitur, ut Browsing L&S I came to the entry on the verb sequor, meaning II.B.4, that reads: In logical conclusions, to follow, ensue; with subject-clause, especially with ut. And ...
Rafael's user avatar
  • 11.5k
7 votes

6 types of person in verb or 3?

It is a matter of counting, but I would consider it more natural to say that there are 3 instead of 6 persons. The point of the three-person view is that there is the additional property of "...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes

"If and only if"

I think the phrase neque aliter would fit. as in si, neque aliter fieri potest. . . . Neque aliter has plenty of precedents, easily found by googling, including some classical (e.g. in Cic. pro Sest. ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
  • 18.1k
6 votes

A list of the categories and subcategories of the Latin conjunctions

[Warning: I am subject to error; and grammar/ syntax is subject to fashion. Terminology and taxonomy will vary in older grammars.] PARATAXIS Copulative: Felis abest et mures ludunt. Felis abest, ...
Hugh's user avatar
  • 8,693
6 votes

Why is the Roman acronym SPQR and not SPR?

Interestingly, the 1895 (or 1896) book Latin Inscriptions by James Egbert Jr. provides a through study of, well, Latin inscriptions, including acronyms. An online version of the book can be found here....
luchonacho's user avatar
  • 12.4k
6 votes
Accepted

Is "autem" an adversative or copulative particle?

Well, to my surprise, L&S says it's both, literally: I. conj. [v. aut init.], on the other hand, but, yet, however, nevertheless; sometimes an emphasized and Primarily, autem, it's adversative....
Rafael's user avatar
  • 11.5k
6 votes
Accepted

Is δέ an adversative or copulative particle?

The simple answer is both. Here is the outline of what Perseus’ word study tool says: δέ , A. but: adversative and copulative Particle, I. answering to μέν [... (adversative) ...] II. ...
Dario's user avatar
  • 3,246
6 votes

Can a noun be qualified by two juxtaposed adjectives?

The rule you read is essentially correct, but: It applies only to pairs of words, not to longer lists. If three or more elements are combined, the asyndeton (no conjunctions) is used, or conjunctions ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Conjunctive "cum" + indicative in Menaechmi

My answer will be about the printed text: Pol profecto haud est dissimilis, meam quom formam noscito. quom is just an archaic spelling of the conjunction and preposition cum, so your question still ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.5k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible