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When and why did the ablative form?

The Latin ablative case represents a merger of three earlier Proto-Indo European (PIE) cases: the ablative (sometimes referred to as the 'from' case, because it was used to express ideas of source, ...
cnread's user avatar
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19 votes
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Latin plural of Curriculum Vitae?

It's the former, curricula vitae. As the article linked in Wikipedia points out, vitarum would indicate that there are multiple lives mentioned per each curriculum. However, vitae as a genitive is ...
cmw's user avatar
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17 votes
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Ave Verum Corpus: why ablative?

The subject is latus. Definition 6 in OLD is most relevant here: 6 (of solid objects, usu. w. abl.) To be bathed or soaked (in a fluid specified or implied), run, stream, overflow, etc.) For ...
cnread's user avatar
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16 votes

What is the logic behind the order of the cases

The Greek - and hence Roman - tradition is to list cases in the order: NOM - GEN etc. Dionysius Thrax (170-90 BCE) is considered to be the first extant record of this system - see a screenshot from ...
Alex B.'s user avatar
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16 votes
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Is "mihi audi!" incorrect?

Your match of mihi with "to" is correct, but that's the dative case, not the genitive. The genitive is mei. Neither case is appropriate here, though. Audio more or less contains the idea of &...
Matt Gutting's user avatar
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16 votes

Gen. 1:20 is reptile ablative?

Jerome probably prefers to stick to the original Hebrew that uses the singulars both for "reptile"(*) and volatile which are grammatically adjectives but used here as substantives. ...
d_e's user avatar
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15 votes

When and why did the ablative form?

This is a very abbreviated answer, which I will intend to expand on in the future (unless others get in there before me). The short answer is that the ablative didn't replace any earlier case - it ...
varro's user avatar
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14 votes
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Are the cases in Latin always six?

Generally, most nouns and adjectives have six cases (nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, ablative, and vocative). However, this isn't always the case. Some words are defective, where they appear ...
cmw's user avatar
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Is any word attested in both vocative and locative?

Corinthus City names regularly have locative forms (identical to the genitive singular), and it is not too rare for them to be addressed with a vocative, which takes the regular ending -e if the name ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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Why is 'cum' followed by the dative in this sentence?

It's actually the ablative, not the dative. It's an i-stem, and Latin allows some i-stems to have an ablative singular in ī. I've copied the relevant section from Allen and Greenough below: The ...
cmw's user avatar
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11 votes
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Why is there no case agreement between "magni" and "poetae"?

There is agreement, in fact! Both of these words are masculine genitive singular. The trick is that poēta is a masculine noun, despite being in the first declension. So the genitive singular is -ae, ...
Draconis's user avatar
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Gen. 1:20 is reptile ablative?

I understand the phrase producant aquae reptile animae viventis to mean something like "let the waters bring forth the creeping/crawling thing of living breath." In more idiomatic English, ...
Vegawatcher's user avatar
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11 votes
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Why "quod" and not "quo" is used here?

A relative pronoun agrees with its antecedent in gender and number. Its case is determined by its role in the relative clause. In this case, quod agrees with ferrum in gender (neuter) and number (...
brianpck's user avatar
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11 votes
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About the nominative on "dimitte nobis debita nostra"

It's not nominative. It's accusative plural. With neuters, the nominative and the accusative look exactly the same, both ending in -a in the plural. Also, regarding nobis, it's dative of separation ...
cmw's user avatar
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10 votes

Latin plural of Curriculum Vitae?

I agree with C. M. Weimer's response and have found three authors who use curricula vitae in their writings. Cicero ante Socratem Democritum Anaxagoram Empedoclem omnes paene veteres, qui nihil ...
brianpck's user avatar
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10 votes

Is it grammatically correct to attributively use nominative forms of nouns in New Latin?

It's valid even in Classical Latin, in fact! Generally, it's fine to put two nouns together in the nominative (or, rather, in the same case) when one of them gives the general category of a thing and ...
Draconis's user avatar
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9 votes

Is any word attested in both vocative and locative?

I prefer the vocative to be distinct from the nominative, if possible. One word that does have a distinct locative and a distinct vocative is: animus The vocative is plentiful in both Plautus and ...
cmw's user avatar
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What's the role of the pronoun "iis" in this context?

This is often called the Dative of the Person Judging (aka Dativus iudicantis; cf. also the "Dative of Relation": e.g. see this link), which is sometimes considered as a specific case of the ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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Why not "eminentissimus" and "reverendissimus"?

I would say it's the same reason you see papam instead of papa above. That is, the whole thing is the direct object of habēmus. In other words, the meaning is "we have a Pope, [we have a] most ...
Draconis's user avatar
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Which common nouns have a locative?

I don't know of a complete list, but Albert Hoefer has an extensive one: "Pronouns": ubi, ibi, hic, illic However, I doubt these are true locatives. See de Vaan on ubi: ubi 'where' [adv.]....
cmw's user avatar
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8 votes
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Sentence which includes an example of each case

Here is another set of examples aimed at the precious bonus points. Now the cases are in the order they are taught here (nom, acc, gen, dat, abl) so as to help memorization; feel free to permute to ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes

Sentence which includes an example of each case

Here is an example using all seven cases in a typical way: Marce, vir feminae panem e furno pistoris Romae dat. Marcus (voc.), the man (nom.) gives a bread (acc.) from the baker's (gen.) oven (abl.) ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes
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The interjection "o" with different cases

Typically, Latin dictionaries just lump these uses together, hence your confusion. O (oh) can used with a number of cases other than the vocative when there's no addressing a person. For instance, the ...
Alex B.'s user avatar
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8 votes

Is it grammatically correct to attributively use nominative forms of nouns in New Latin?

Adding to Cerberus's answer, an "attributive noun" is not the same thing as an appositive noun/apposition. Latin has apposition; it does not have attributive nouns. An attributive noun would ...
Asteroides's user avatar
8 votes

Is any word attested in both vocative and locative?

Domus This doesn't fulfill your second criterion, because the vocative looks exactly the same as the nominative (i.e. it's not second declension masculine). But it's famously one of the common nouns ...
Draconis's user avatar
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7 votes

What is the logic behind the order of the cases

Overview | ---------------|------------------|--------------------------| | Case ordering | Origin | Popular in | | ---------------|------------------|-------------------------...
rjpond's user avatar
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7 votes
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Correct pronunciation of full Latin dates

There is probably no fixed standard, and I am not sure there is any authority that might set one. I believe many Latin speakers do not leave out the anno. However, when Pope Benedict XVI announced his ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
7 votes

Is it grammatically correct to attributively use nominative forms of nouns in New Latin?

In addition to Draconis's good examples, for linguistic reference, this is normally called apposition: Apposition is a grammatical construction in which two elements, normally noun phrases, are ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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7 votes
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De passiva voce cum verbis quae casum dativum postulant

Quā dē causā ōrātiōnis subjectum in nōminātīvō nōn pōnātur ex hīs liquēbit: Jūlia Mārcō rosam dat = rosa Mārcō ā Jūliā datur != Mārcus ā Jūliā datur Jūlia Mārcō omnia ignōscit = omnia Mārcō ā Jūliā ...
Unbrutal_Russian's user avatar
7 votes

What's the grammatical role of "mille passus" in this sentence?

Mille passus a fine imperii is an adverbial phrase modifying habitat. Habitat is used intransitively in this sentence. Mille passus is in the accusative because that's generally the case used to ...
consistebat's user avatar

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