13

There is no significance to the word order, and both are perfectly acceptable in Latin. In fact, it is only in English translation that there is a difference felt. The genitive in Latin is perfectly at home come before or after the noun. For example, Lucretius wrote De Rerum Natura while Cicero wrote De Natura Deorum. The choice is stylistic. And Ph.D. isn't ...


10

If you want a single word meaning "high school" specifically, I think the closest would be lycēum. I think the word schŏla "school" would also be appropriate in reference to a high school. As you note, the concept of a "high school" seems to be modern, so there is probably no exact classical equivalent. Joonas mentioned the word lycēum in chat, and I think ...


9

Professor Wilifried Stroh's lectures on the history of Latin literature and on other subjects are incredibly entertaining, learned, and eloquent. I don't know when he made them, but since he was born in 1950 I doubt it was before 1960, unfortunately. Still, they're very worth listening to.


9

A Google search reveals several instances of Quod Deus Optime Vertat or simply QDOV in titles of things, but most of them seem similarly ambiguous. However, a letter written on September 21 of 1520 in Frankfurt by Karl Gillert to Conrad Mutianus (as quoted in Historical Sources of the Province of Saxony and Adjacent Areas, volume 18, which seems to contain ...


9

The first ever female professor (and second ever female laureate) was Laura Bassi, who held her dissertation in philosophy in 1732 at the university of Bologna and taught Newtonian physics there. I've found this effigies of hers which reads, «LAURA CATHARINA BASSIA / Bononiensis / Philosophiae Doctrix, Collegii Lectrix publica / Instituti Scientiarum Socia. [...


9

The proper word for 'fellow' seems to be socius, at least according to John G. Griffith, the former Public Orator at Oxford University (1973-80) and Fellow and Tutor in Classics, Jesus College (1938-80). Here are a couple of instances from his Oratiunculae Oxonienses Selectae of 1985. Note that socius is distinct from sodalis, which is a mere member: Mihi ...


8

The most general words for 'school' are ludus and schola, the latter usually being reserved for more advanced students. (You might also like academia, but it really refers to a place for philosophical discussion, rather than instruction.) There is a choice of adjectival name for Rochester : Durobrivensis (from the oldest name, something like 'Durobrivae'), ...


7

It is a 17th-century Latinisation of the Anglo-Saxon name for the town: "The term is derived from Cantabrigia, a medieval Latin name for Cambridge invented on the basis of the Anglo-Saxon name Cantebrigge." Cantebrigge, also known as Grentebrige, is itself an evolution of the earlier name Grantabrycge - bridge over the Granta. The Roman name for the town ...


7

The title page of Gauss's book says "auctore D. Carolo Friderico Gauss". It is an ablative absolute: "the author being C.F.G." Without "auctore" it would make no sense. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disquisitiones_Arithmeticae#/media/File:Disqvisitiones-800.jpg


7

In the Czech Republic there are many diplomas issued in Latin (definitely the largest Charles University does so) and hence official translation services are available. The services do include translations into English and German, because that's what Czechs need the translations for, the Latin original is normally accepted here just fine. For example: ...


6

It depends on context. You could use Medea Ovidii (Ovid's Medea) in most contexts. In the title page of a book, it is typical to write something like Medea actore ovidio (Medea, the author being Ovid). This is an absolute ablative as mentioned in fdb's answer. It would also be grammatical to write Medea ab Ovidio scripta (Medea written by Ovid). A plain ...


6

First of all, I think @sumelic's answer is excellent (and I've upvoted it), but I think it would be remiss not to mention a reasonable alternative, gymnasium.


5

In my experience, academic theses are defended in public with permission — and perhaps protection — of high university officials, and this is often indicated on the title page. Consider for example this dissertation (which contains a poem that I asked about). The title page says: D. F. G. ANIMADVERSIONES SUBITANEAE CIRCA PRINCIPIUM ...


5

While the Romans did not give swords to those who became educated at a higher level (education was not as formal as it is today), they did give swords for other occasions, such as when a gladiator was freed from slavery (rudis). This does not quite fit your situation, however, so I turned to swords that looked similar. The most similar sword is the spatha, ...


5

These phrases come from English Law Latin, which divides the Legal Year into four quarters: Terminus Paschae, Terminus Trinitatis, Terminus Sancti Michaelis, Terminus Sancti Hilarii. See this: https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=DeQYXYMBtwgC&pg=PA976&lpg=PA976&dq=%22Terminus+trinitatis%22&source=bl&ots=CV2kk-794L&sig=...


5

My suggestion: Franciscus te/vos libenter invitat in dissertationem, in qua thesem suam nomine "Aptatio spectralis proteinorum lucipetorum theoria electrostatica explicata" defendet die inedita anno MMXVIII exeunte in Universitate Iohannis Gutenberg Moguntina, Saarstr. XXI, atque in merendam sequentem in culina instituti physicae theoreticae. Membra ...


5

Given that this question has gone unanswered for over a year, I'll provide what partial evidence I can. Here's what Macrobius had to say about the gender of Venus (Sat III.8.2 onward): signum etiam eius est Cypri barbatum, corpore et veste muliebri, cum sceptro ac natura virili et putant eandem marem ac feminam esse. Aristophanes eam Ἀφρόδιτον appellat. ...


5

I am a nonbinary latin student and I do sometimes use masculine, but mainly neuter terms. I realize it is not typically used for humans, but language is made to be adjusted to the people's needs. I think it depends on the individual, but I think most of us use neuter. It doesn't matter if you think it's dehumanizing as long as the nonbinary person is okay ...


5

Interesting question! I quote in extenso from a 1907's book titled "The rise and early constitution of universities, with a survey of mediæval education" (available here): The term "universitas" had no connection with "universale," and did not, any more than the word "generale," carry with it any reference to the universality of the curriculum of study. ...


5

Well, a search for "Vatican" and "Latin translator" put me on to this guy, Daniel Gallagher, who has left the priesthood and has joined the Classics faculty at Cornell, "[a]fter eight years at the Vatican translating the pope’s messages – sermons, letters, even tweets – into Latin ..." You can read the rest of the article here. Which is really just ...


4

Let me translate sentence by sentence. Second opinions (and answers) are welcome. Qui præ nimia tristitia, strictim complosis manibus et stridentes dentibus ingemiscebant. They groaned because of too much grief, clapping their hands tightly and creaking their teeth. This may or may not be idiomatic English, but I hope the message is clear. ...


4

Whenever I need to translate relatively new words into Latin, I find that the Morgan and Silva Furman University Lexicon is particularly useful. Here is the entry for "major", which is what we call a student's primary concentration in the U.S. .univ major in, specialize in / speciale studium (alicuius rei) amplecti | major, specialization specializatio*...


4

It seems there are quite a lot of places to look for thoughts about the various words for swords. I offer passages from three, in chronological order: Ramshorn (1841) gives the following commentary about some of the words for "sword": Gladius, the sword for cut and thrust; Ensis, the longer sword, more adapted for the blow or cut, hence with heroes and ...


4

The word you want is favilla, which actually means 'glowing embers', or anything still hot and smouldering after combustion. As examples : ibi tu calentem debita sparges lacrima favillam vatis amici (Hor. Odes 2.6.23) And the well-known medieval hymn, Dies Irae, dies illa / solvet saeclum in favilla.


4

After looking at a number of Title pages, I found jussu senatus By order of the Senate. on works published collectively such as statutes,books of medical recipes,public lectures. And one historical example which almost fits iussu senatus, iure iurando pollicitans, by order of the Senate, promising on oath These are J not I, and in ...


4

The “Dictionary of British Place names” writes: Grontabricc c.745, Cantebrigie 1086 (db). ‘Bridge on the River Granta’. Celtic river-name (see Grantchester) + OE brycg. The change from Grant- to Cam- is due to Norman influence. Cambridgeshire (OE scīr ‘district’) is first referred to in the 11th cent. The later river-name Cam is a back-formation ...


4

I found this service when I searched Google: Scholaro Translation They specifically mention translating diplomas from Latin, and are a member of the American Translators Association. I don't know whether that carries much weight in and of itself, though, since I'm not familiar with that association. They also mention their translations are accepted world ...


4

The Colombian Ministry of External Relations can produce an official certificate that Colombia has no official translators between Latin and Spanish: https://www.traduccionesbogota.com/la-guia-definitiva-de-traducciones-en-bogota-colombia/


4

It is not the same as full revival, but the International code of botanical nomenclature used to require that "On or after 1 January 1935 a name of a new taxon (algal and all fossil taxa excepted) must, in order to be validly published, be accompanied by a Latin description or diagnosis or by a reference to a previously and effectively published Latin ...


3

I don't know any specifics, but I'll present my best guess. According to Wikipedia, "Cambridge" was known in Anglo-Saxon times as "Grantebrycge", and the river it was on was known as the "Granta". Later, in Middle English times, the town became renamed as "Cambridge", and part of the river that went through it was renamed the "Cam", after the town. So, ...


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