14 votes
Accepted

What did a *cellarius* do?

Here is the little I could glean from the literature about the actual tasks of the cellarius. Celarii are mentioned frequently enough in texts but there is very little about their tasks, ...
Penelope's user avatar
  • 8,701
8 votes
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Is "vicepraesidens" valid for "vice president"?

It's Late Latin. From the OED: Originally this governed a following word in the genitive, but in late Latin the tendency to use the phrase as a compound noun appears in vicequæstor (equivalent to ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 53.6k
6 votes
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What is an entrepreneur?

For 'entrepreneur', or even 'businessman', just as in English, there are few words in Latin of such broad meaning. With the senatorial ranks officially forbidden to engage in commerce, it was left to ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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5 votes
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What's the the Latin word for a government minister / secretary?

Traupman's book is great for a lot of things, but there are some things he seems just to have made up (as far as I can tell), and administer, minister seem to be among them. I think there's a sense of ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
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4 votes
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Comparing -logists and -nomists

I feel like -logy and -nomy are more pertinent here, with the -ists being secondary developments from those. -logy goes back to -λογία, which is a combination of λέγω 'to speak; to collect', λόγος '...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
  • 9,745
4 votes

A good word for waiter or waitress

I suggest pincerna (Thanks to the comment of @Hugh, I found this word in the Vulgata in the Joseph-in-prison scene.)
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
4 votes
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A good word for waiter or waitress

In a smaller restaurant, caupo would be very appropriate, particularly if it's a family business. Another word which was certainly used in Antiquity was simply puer (see Sense B.2 in L&S). But if ...
Wtrmute's user avatar
  • 1,216
3 votes

How to distinguish "lecturer" and "reader" in Latin?

According to this dictionary or this one, both are translated by prælector. Lewis&Short gives then this definition of prælector: praelector, ōris, m. id., one who reads an author to others and ...
Luc's user avatar
  • 2,332
3 votes

How to describe ministers in Latin?

Minister somehow doesn't quite fit the case: its primary meanings imply subservience. A better word would, I think, be praepositivus, which better indicates someone put in charge. This kind of thing ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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2 votes
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How to distinguish assistant and associate professors?

I found an attestation of the title professor auxiliaris: Antonius Toledo, Iuris in Universitate Professor Auxiliaris. See page 4 (= 286) of this file. The support for this translation is ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
2 votes

A good word for waiter or waitress

There are a lot of good answers here, but the one I like best is in the OP's question, minister and ministra. It is true that minister has a somewhat broader meaning than "waiter", but if you are in ...
Figulus's user avatar
  • 4,544
2 votes

How to translate "tenure"?

In Italy, quoting the website of the European University Institute, apart from ‘assegno di ricerca’, ‘professore a contratto’, and ‘ricercatore di tipo B’, all other positions are tenure or tenure-...
Vincenzo Oliva's user avatar
1 vote

How to translate "tenure"?

Central-European have a similar concept where the important step is a habilitation. habilitatio (medieval) - making qualified or eligible, declaratio habilitatis - declaration of qualification. After ...
Vladimir F Героям слава's user avatar
1 vote

How to translate "tenure"?

To make sure the word is understood correctly as referring to the academic concept of tenure, I suggest taking a word that is easily connected to the English "tenure". My suggestion is tentura, "...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
1 vote

A good word for waiter or waitress

For a definitively medieval flavour I suggest another word buticularius (the source of the modern English word "butler". The word buticularius is AFAIK not attested for the Classical period.
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar

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