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20

Caesar (B. Gall., iii, 27) simply uses subest “be close at hand, be near”: ...quod hiems suberat... Thus, hiems subest.


17

A quick web search shows that the phrase 'Diabolus enim et alii Daemones' (without the contra) appears to originate from the Fourth Council of the Lateran (1215). The full sentence is Diabolus enim et alii daemones a Deo quidem natura creati sunt boni, sed ipsi per se facti sunt mali, which I would translate as something like, 'For the Devil and other demons ...


16

E unum pluribus has just the same meaning as the original (though you might better use the ex form of the preposition when it precedes a vowel). The reverse, 'many out of one', would merely require the cases to be reversed, giving ex uno plures.


15

I'm surprised appropinquo (sometimes spelled adpropinquo) hasn't been mentioned yet. Caesar (Bellum Civile 3.9) also uses this one, and to my ears, it better fits what is being said in the show. jamque hiems adpropinquabat At that point winter was approaching... I can envision Romans, worried about the coming winter, saying "Hiems appropinquat." ...


15

Latin doesn't have a single standardized orthography. The spelling "perfectio" is a fine way to write the Latin word for "perfection". In fact, a number of people would prefer "perfectio" over "perfectiō". I would not recommend using a macron in a slogan, especially since you are also spelling the word jacet with the letter J. This isn't incorrect from a ...


15

I'd go for a wordplay: Pater optime cerevisiam sapit Just as the other answers, pater is straightforwardly father The verb sapio means both to taste and to know/understand. Hence sapit is the right conjugation to speak about a third person (a "he", the father) who knows. In Latin you have different words for knowing. Not sure how to describe them in ...


13

My suggestion is praedator summus. The word summus means "highest", "top", "peak", "last", "supreme", "most important", and similar things. See Lewis and Short (superus III.C) for details. An apex predator is the last one in a food chain and at the top of the ecological structure. I find summus to be a good description of this situation, and it also ...


13

The best phrase would be Deus optimus maximus, literally “God [is] best and greatest”. Not only is the meaning right but it has an ancient lineage which makes it perfect for this use. Iuppiter optimus maximus is a standard pagan formula for Jupiter. Christianity took this phrase over and the dedication Deo optimo maximo, “To God, best and greatest”, ...


13

To offer a variant to the great suggestions by Nickimite: Amore crescit. [It] grows with love. There is an implicit noun or pronoun of some kind, but you don't have to spell it out and it can vary. It could be life, faith, love itself, a child, or anything else that could be referred to as it, he, or she. Adding an explicit subject vita (life) as ...


12

You're right that it's a gerundive of obligation, and thus requires a form of esse. However, it doesn't have to be expressed. Tacitus Annals 1.29 contains two without esse, though they're in indirect statements: certatum inde sententiis, cum alii opperiendos legatos atque interim comitate permulcendum militem censerent, alii fortioribus remediis agendum: ...


11

I agree with varro that neither translation is correct. The most sensible translation seems to be indeed "I, the speed, eradicate". It's a weird personification, but possible. However, it is more likely to be wrong than clever. I suspect that someone looked up the two words in a dictionary but did not realize that the words might need to be inflected. They ...


11

My suggestion is: Rami universi ex una radice. Literally, this means "all the branches from the same root". There is no need for an explicit verb, especially for a motto. There are a couple of choices here I wish to point out explicitly: The wording is compact so as to fit a motto. I used chiastic word order to highlight the branches and the root at the ...


11

I would go with Mors humanae gentis inimicis. This is a literal translation that follows the original pretty closely: mors "death", humanae gentis "of the human race, of mankind", inimicis "to the enemies". Latin word order is flexible; this order sounds best to me, but others would be grammatically correct too. (Note that if you ask Google Translate, ...


10

The motto calls upon connotations and associations in Latin that are hard to evoke in an analogous way in English. So here is a clumsy translation followed by some exposition of generosus and virtus so you can follow for yourself how they combine in the motto: High-born manliness fears nothing. generosus The adjective generosus = genus + -osus. Genus is ...


10

Apex is a noun, and Latin cannot, unlike English, use nouns as adjectives. I don't know if there was a set phrase for this term, though I doubt it. Praedator is where we get the word 'predator' from, and like the English, it can mean "hunter." Apex is a metaphorical word for "top," so I'd suggest something like: Praedator primus Primus means "first," ...


9

Let's analyze the sentence word-by-word first: Nil/nihil translates mainly as nothing (either noun or adverb). It is indeclinable (hence it gives no clue about its grammatical function in the sentence.) virtus is a feminine noun meaning either strength or virtue. The ending tells us it is either the subject of the sentence (nominative case) or it is being ...


9

Google Translate is notoriously bad with Latin. It seems to have little understanding of Latin grammar. If you only want single words, you are much better off using an online Latin dictionary of your choice. I do not know an online service (or any computerized tool) that translates Latin reliably. The Latin phrase capere semper in posterum means roughly "to ...


9

I like Tom Cotton's suggestion, and I will offer a variant of it. In the original motto e pluribus unum the "one" is neuter. By analogy, I prefer to make the "many" of the new version neuter: Ex uno plura. From one, many. The reason why the translation suggested in the question does not quite work is Latin case inflection. For example, the preposition ...


9

Gusto/gustare means to taste, but in the sense of someone having a taste of something. The verb you are looking for, IMO is sapio/sapire. It can be accompanied by a noun in the accusative case to mean to taste like something. (Piscis saperet ipsum mare being an example). Note that this like is somewhat idiomatic in English. You can translate it literally ...


9

While in classical Latin summus might have been the best word, the Christian tradition uses altissimus to translate both the Hebrew and the Aramaic words found in the Old Testament for the concept of “highest God”. See e.g. Daniel, chap. 5, v. 18 (as in the Clementine Vulgate) O rex, Deus altissimus regnum et magnificentiam, gloriam et honorem dedit ...


9

I don't like having "things" in the predicate. I like one of these translations: Vita crescit amore. "Life grows (taller) with love" Vita per amorem nascitur. "Life is born through love" Caput vitae alet amoris fundamentum. "The beginning of life will grow the foundation of love." OR "A foundation of love will grow the beginning of life" The last ...


8

As point out in the comments, scholaris is an adjective meaning "belonging to a school" or "of school". If you say opus scholare, vox scholaris, it means "work of school, voice of school". To me that sounds essentially opposite of what you want to say, so I would not suggest it. Notice in my example above that opus is a neuter and therefore the adjective is ...


8

In French, this proverb exists in the form: Aide-toi et le ciel t’aidera. This comes from a fable of La Fontaine, Le Chartier embourbé. So there is the possibility to read the Latin and Greek fables that gave him inspiration. Æsopus, Βοηλάτης καὶ Ἡρακλῆς Well it’s Greek, but I just mention it. (…) τοῖς θεοῖς δ᾿ εὔχου, ὅταν τι ποιῇς καὐτός· μὴ μάτην ...


7

I would suggest semper carpe futūra. Here, futura (futūra) is a participle conjugated in the present tense and active voice, declined in the neuter gender, plural number, and accusative case. I chose futūra because the idea is not simply enjoying abstract and intangible time (singular number), but rather, enjoying the things to come in the future (plural ...


7

First, Google Translate is horrible with Latin, and doubt is wise. In matters of any importance I strongly suggest consulting a person who knows Latin, and this site is a good option for it. Periculosum is just the adjective I would use for "dangerous", but the form is wrong. The best choice is periculosi; I will discuss options below. I would read simul ...


7

Please, do not use the accusative here. As far as I have learned meminisse is one of those words that normally require an object in its genitive form. Combinations like meminisse de aliquo or meminisse aliquem are existent but rather uncommon. To my mind they are also a bit ugly.


7

Step 1 There are various words for calmness. Take a look at these ones, at least: clementia aequanimitas languor lenitudo quietudo tranquillitas Which one looks most suitable to you? Probably some of them are very unsuitable, but the final call is yours to make. The links above are to one online Latin dictionary, but there are several to choose from. The ...


7

Urgueo/urgeo does mean "push/press," but it's more in the sense of trying to push forward rather than into something: militarily, rivers against a shore, age against a person as time passes. I don't think it's the right word. I'm going to offer Magna per lacunas ponenda parvas. as a motto. A literal translation would be something like, "Large things ...


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