21 votes
Accepted

What is "Winter is Coming" in Latin?

Caesar (B. Gall., iii, 27) simply uses subest “be close at hand, be near”: ...quod hiems suberat... Thus, hiems subest.
kkm -still wary of SE promises's user avatar
19 votes

Burn this Shirt

Sebastian's suggestion is perfect but just as an alternative, you could consider Tunica comburenda est! This is literally "the shirt must be burned", but for the amusement of Roman history ...
TKR's user avatar
  • 31.3k
18 votes

Joke variant of US motto

E unum pluribus has just the same meaning as the original (though you might better use the ex form of the preposition when it precedes a vowel). The reverse, 'many out of one', would merely require ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
  • 18.1k
17 votes
Accepted

What does "enim et" mean?

A quick web search shows that the phrase 'Diabolus enim et alii Daemones' (without the contra) appears to originate from the Fourth Council of the Lateran (1215). The full sentence is Diabolus enim et ...
cnread's user avatar
  • 20.1k
17 votes
Accepted

Burn this Shirt

Where to start? First, with a word for “burn.” The most general word is uro; however, in this case comburo (burn up, burn completely) is more fitting. Next, “shirt” is always a bit difficult to ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
16 votes

What is "Winter is Coming" in Latin?

I'm surprised appropinquo (sometimes spelled adpropinquo) hasn't been mentioned yet. Caesar (Bellum Civile 3.9) also uses this one, and to my ears, it better fits what is being said in the show. ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 54.6k
16 votes

Translating "Father knows beer best" into Latin

I'd go for a wordplay: Pater optime cerevisiam sapit Just as the other answers, pater is straightforwardly father The verb sapio means both to taste and to know/understand. Hence sapit is the ...
Rafael's user avatar
  • 11.4k
16 votes

How to translate "He who can, must"?

I have three suggestions: Potentis est facere. Qui potest, debet. Si potes, fac. The first one is "it is of the able to do", which in more fluent English would be "it is the duty of ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
15 votes
Accepted

Is it acceptable/regular to use diacritics (macron) in written texts?

Latin doesn't have a single standardized orthography. The spelling "perfectio" is a fine way to write the Latin word for "perfection". In fact, a number of people would prefer "perfectio" over "...
Asteroides's user avatar
15 votes
Accepted

Tastes Like Chicken

Gusto/gustare means to taste, but in the sense of someone having a taste of something. The verb you are looking for, IMO is sapio/sapire. It can be accompanied by a noun in the accusative case to ...
Rafael's user avatar
  • 11.4k
14 votes
Accepted

Translation from the English Apex Predator?

My suggestion is praedator summus. The word summus means "highest", "top", "peak", "last", "supreme", "most important", and similar things. See Lewis and Short (superus III.C) for details. An apex ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
14 votes

Request for a Latin phrase as motto "God is highest/supreme"

The best phrase would be Deus optimus maximus, literally “God [is] best and greatest”. Not only is the meaning right but it has an ancient lineage which makes it perfect for this use. Iuppiter ...
Martin Kochanski's user avatar
14 votes

Is "mens semita tua" the correct translation for "mind your path"?

As Expedito Bipes says, via is probably a better word for "path" than semita in this context. I'm going to suggest a different verb: Memento viae tuae. Memento means "to mind" in ...
TKR's user avatar
  • 31.3k
13 votes
Accepted

Hogwarts Motto from J.K. Rowling's "Harry Potter" series

You're right that it's a gerundive of obligation, and thus requires a form of esse. However, it doesn't have to be expressed. Tacitus Annals 1.29 contains two without esse, though they're in indirect ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 54.6k
13 votes

Translation of "Love makes it grow" in Latin for my tattoo

To offer a variant to the great suggestions by Nickimite: Amore crescit. [It] grows with love. There is an implicit noun or pronoun of some kind, but you don't have to spell it out and it can ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
13 votes
Accepted

Is "mens semita tua" the correct translation for "mind your path"?

I would translate it as: Custodi viam tuam The word semita denotes a narrow path and is probably not what you're looking for. I believe via would be a better fit, because it's often used in a more ...
Expedito Bipes's user avatar
13 votes

How can I say "We shall want for nothing" in Latin?

This feels like it's intended as a callback to Psalm 23, which in the KJV starts: The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. The corresponding line in the Vulgate (where it's Psalm 22): Dominus ...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
  • 10.1k
12 votes
Accepted

How do you say "under an angel's wing" in Latin?

It's the latter option. Angelus would be nominative, i.e. the subject of the sentence, whereas angeli here would denote possession. If she got the former translation, it reads "an angel under a ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 54.6k
12 votes

How can I say "We shall want for nothing" in Latin?

I agree that Psalm 23 is a natural choice, but if you wanted to avoid the religious connection, another common word for this is egere, and if you check under its entry on Lewis and Short (skip the ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 54.6k
11 votes

"Nil virtus generosa timet"

The motto calls upon connotations and associations in Latin that are hard to evoke in an analogous way in English. So here is a clumsy translation followed by some exposition of generosus and virtus ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
  • 15.9k
11 votes
Accepted

Ars gratia artis

"Art for the Sake of Art" This phrase, quite conveniently, uses the same word order in both English and Latin. Ars, artis (artium) is a third-declension feminine noun. It can mean "art&...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67k
11 votes
Accepted

Velocitas eradico — "get rid of speed" or "with speed, eliminate"

I agree with varro that neither translation is correct. The most sensible translation seems to be indeed "I, the speed, eradicate". It's a weird personification, but possible. However, it is more ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

"Every Branch Shares The Same Root" - having trouble translating "Shares"

My suggestion is: Rami universi ex una radice. Literally, this means "all the branches from the same root". There is no need for an explicit verb, especially for a motto. There are a couple of ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
11 votes

Latin Translation for "Death to the enemies of mankind"

I would go with Mors humanae gentis inimicis. This is a literal translation that follows the original pretty closely: mors "death", humanae gentis "of the human race, of mankind", inimicis "to the ...
TKR's user avatar
  • 31.3k
11 votes
Accepted

Greek quote source

The line is, in fact: Τα γ’αριστα ουδεν ημιν αμεινονα It would seem that, somewhere along the line, it has been transcribed incorrectly. I can just imagine a harried reporter hearing the line and ...
Penelope's user avatar
  • 8,711
10 votes
Accepted

Does this Latin make sense?

Google Translate is notoriously bad with Latin. It seems to have little understanding of Latin grammar. If you only want single words, you are much better off using an online Latin dictionary of your ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
10 votes

Translation from the English Apex Predator?

Apex is a noun, and Latin cannot, unlike English, use nouns as adjectives. I don't know if there was a set phrase for this term, though I doubt it. Praedator is where we get the word 'predator' from,...
cmw's user avatar
  • 54.6k
10 votes

Joke variant of US motto

I like Tom Cotton's suggestion, and I will offer a variant of it. In the original motto e pluribus unum the "one" is neuter. By analogy, I prefer to make the "many" of the new version neuter: Ex ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

Request for a Latin phrase as motto "God is highest/supreme"

While in classical Latin summus might have been the best word, the Christian tradition uses altissimus to translate both the Hebrew and the Aramaic words found in the Old Testament for the concept of “...
Dario's user avatar
  • 3,246
10 votes

How do you say "under an angel's wing" in Latin?

The first phrasing you quote has the nominative case angelus of the Latin word for an angel. Thus it means roughly: Sub ala angelus. [There is] an angel under [a/the] wing. Latin often leaves out &...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar

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