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15 votes
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Is it acceptable/regular to use diacritics (macron) in written texts?

Latin doesn't have a single standardized orthography. The spelling "perfectio" is a fine way to write the Latin word for "perfection". In fact, a number of people would prefer "perfectio" over "...
Asteroides's user avatar
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11 votes
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Interpretation of circumflex in a poem from 1621

*Please see addendum at the bottom I have found two possible explanations for the circumflex: (1) to indicate a long vowel and (2) to indicate an ablative. Both of these functions would seem to ...
Penelope's user avatar
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11 votes

How do I know where to place macrons?

Macrons are mainly pronunciation guides, telling which vowels are pronounced long. In some cases they can resolve ambiguities, when two words only differ by the length a vowel. Using them is not ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
10 votes

Roman uses of diacritical marks

The Romans actually didn't use diacritical marks for the most part. I understand that this question was asked based off of a comment made on a post (which was answered by myself). In my response, I ...
Sam K's user avatar
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9 votes
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When were macrons first used to mark Latin text?

This is what I’ve been able to find – thanks to Oliver 1966. Oliver 1966 (in footnote 42) mentions two documents important to us, both of them most likely were schoolbook texts: A fifth-century ...
Alex B.'s user avatar
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9 votes
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What are popular fonts for polytonic Greek?

I've long relied on the free Gentium typeface, which has a simply gorgeous, highly readable polytonic Greek font, with diacriticals that I've always found quite easy to distinguish, both on the ...
cnread's user avatar
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8 votes
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What are the ways in which Greek print might indicate diaeresis?

One option, as you say, is putting a diacritic on the first vowel. Since diacritics are always put on the second vowel of a diphthong, and breathings are always put on the first vowel of a word, αἰ ...
Draconis's user avatar
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8 votes
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Qua ratione in hoc libro Henrici Allen notæ diacriticæ ponuntur?

This has been referred to as the Neo-Latin Orthography. An example of a grammar written with this type of orthography is An Introduction to the Latin Tongue by G. N. Wright. Concerning the use of ...
Expedito Bipes's user avatar
7 votes
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Use of circumflex in Latin: Is there a difference between "hora" and "horâ"?

There is no difference between “unâ horâ” and “una hora” in this context Lapis descendit ab A ad B unâ horâ. Lapis descendit ab A ad B una hora. In the context of comparing these two sentences, ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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7 votes

Use of circumflex in Latin: Is there a difference between "hora" and "horâ"?

In that particular example sentence, no. In general, yes. The circumflex used by some authors to indicate long vowels. I prefer to use the macron: hōra versus hōrā. Some ancient inscriptions used an &...
Draconis's user avatar
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6 votes
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What is the pronunciation of O with macron and breve?

Either as a long vowel or as a short one...but linguists aren't entirely sure which. This root appears in Latin (and other languages) with a long ō, nōmen, but in Greek (and others) with a short o, ...
Draconis's user avatar
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6 votes

Is it acceptable/regular to use diacritics (macron) in written texts?

Since sumelic gave a good description of spelling conventions, let me focus on translation alone. I don't quite understand how lux astrum is supposed to work. The only way I can make sense of it is ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
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What does quȩ mean, and what does an e with cedilla mean?

It stands for “quae”, here the nominative plural neuter of the relative pronoun.
fdb's user avatar
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5 votes
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Was Greek ever written in this way at any time in antiquity?

All these features you've mentioned not only can be found, but also they're pretty much default. All ancient Greek inscriptions were written simply in a (rather than the, as there were several ...
cmw's user avatar
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5 votes
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The correct use of the breve in Latin

Use of breve The breve is only used for emphasis. In the typical Latin text no breve or macron appears. When vowel lengths need to be indicated, it is often done by adding macrons over all long vowels ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
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About scribal abbreviations and diacritics in digitalized book titles

In my opinion, you should not try to "improve" the text acciording to your own whims, but represent the text as it is. This means keeping the ampersands and accents as they are. To expand, the grave ...
varro's user avatar
  • 4,698
4 votes

How do I know where to place macrons?

This is a very useful tool: "A Latin Macronizer" at http://alatius.com/macronizer. It automatically adds macrons to any Latin text, while highlighting ambiguous or unknown words, which you will have ...
Jasper May's user avatar
  • 1,256
3 votes

What is the pronunciation of O with macron and breve?

The linked entry in “the free dictionary” has the lemma as “nō̆-men-“, but then proceeds to claim “oldest form *h1no(h3)-mn̥”. If *h1no(h3)-mn̥ is Proto-Indo-European (PIE) what language is nō̆-men- ...
fdb's user avatar
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