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15 votes
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"Ae" pronunciation

There isn't just a single pronunciation of Latin in use, there are many. You can say /ˈgrae̯kae̯/, but whether you "should" is a matter of opinion. The transcription [ae̯] is one way of representing ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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12 votes
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When is "ei" a diphthong?

Very few Latin words contain "ei" as a diphthong. Some possible examples are deinde, dein, deinceps, rei, spei, and in fact, the pronoun ei (but not always). The exact list of examples ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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8 votes
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What are the ways in which Greek print might indicate diaeresis?

One option, as you say, is putting a diacritic on the first vowel. Since diacritics are always put on the second vowel of a diphthong, and breathings are always put on the first vowel of a word, αἰ ...
Draconis's user avatar
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7 votes
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Do vowels before /j/ make diphthongs?

If this question has an answer, the most likely answer is "No, they don't". But in my opinion, the question is not really meaningful. As far as I know, things like the [ej] in "ejus&...
Asteroides's user avatar
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6 votes
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When is ‘ae’ pronounced /ae/?

I don't know of any such list, but they're almost exclusively foreign loans. The only native Latin word I know of with a non-diphthong ae is ahēneus "bronze (adj)", also written aēneus. ...
Draconis's user avatar
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6 votes
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Compensative lengthening of ε and ο to η and ω in Homeric Greek

In earlier Greek, there were four different types of mid vowels: The short monophthongs ε ο /e o/, inherited from PIE *e *o The long monophthongs ει ου /eː oː/, created through contraction and ...
Draconis's user avatar
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6 votes

When is "ei" a diphthong?

The diphthong ei is found before vowels: eius, peior. The intervocalic i is typically geminated (see this question about I and J) so that eius is pronounced like /ej.jus/ which is practically the same ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
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Was -oe- used natively in standard classical Latin, or was every word with -oe- adopted from a foreign or non-standard origin?

This answer is based on the discussions in Weiss and Sihler. The regular development is oi > ū: e.g. ūnus : Gk. οἴνη "one (on a die)". There are inscriptions up until the second half of the 2nd ...
TKR's user avatar
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5 votes

Was -oe- used natively in standard classical Latin, or was every word with -oe- adopted from a foreign or non-standard origin?

It appears that while the oe diphthong was common among words that came from dialects of Latin and/or Greek assimilations, other words exist that appear to be native to Latin. Take coepio (to begin), ...
Sam K's user avatar
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4 votes
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Why could initial iota not create diphthongs?

Latin had a phonemic /j/ and /w/ separate from the vowels /i/ and /u/, hence contrasts like Julius vs Iulus. The short answer is that "Ancient" Greek—as in Classical Attic—simply didn't. ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes
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When did genuine and spurious diphthongs merge?

This merger is thought to have happened in the 5th-4th centuries BC. More specifically, it's a monophthongization, in which [ei ou] became [e: o:]. ("Genuine/spurious diphthongs" is a bit of ...
TKR's user avatar
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4 votes

Do vowels before /j/ make diphthongs?

It would be strange if Latin had diphthongs that could only appear before /j/ -- why the arbitrary restriction? The examples you mention seem to be most naturally analyzed as containing a geminate /j:/...
TKR's user avatar
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3 votes

When is "ei" a diphthong?

In Horatius, Satires, I, 6 : "Deinde eo dormitum, non sollicitus mihi quod cras", the "ei" in "deinde" seems to be a diphtong if my scansion is right?
nico's user avatar
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3 votes

Vowel hiatus and non-diphthong vowel pairs (compared to Romance languages)

I think poetry is the biggest data source indicating that hiatus was usual in Latin for i e u + vowel. In the stage of the language that was ancestral to the Romance languages, both i and e were ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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2 votes

Pronunciation of intervocalic EV in Greek words in Roman Ecclesiastical

The Italian ecclesiastical pronunciation of "ev" is simply /ev/ (e. g. here). The same goes for the French pronunciation of ecclesiastical Latin (only the ending changes: /ɔm/). Addendum ...
Luc's user avatar
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2 votes

Do vowels before /j/ make diphthongs?

Do you think a distinction between /ej:us/ and /eijus/ is meaningful? They are not identical, but the difference is small, especially in the context of Latin pronunciation. I would consider this as ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
2 votes

How to indicate a diphthong?

It isn’t traditionally used in normal writing, but the inverted double-wide breve has been a common way of unambiguously indicating diphthongs when discussing pronunciation (e.g. in discussions of ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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1 vote

How to indicate a diphthong?

If you want to create an unambiguous pronunciation guide to a text, you need a preface where you explain your conventions. A reasonable convention might include, for example, that ae and au are ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
1 vote

How to indicate a diphthong?

Most of them don't need to be marked, since they're completely predictable. For example, ui is only a diphthong in a small number of grammatical words; everywhere else, it's two separate syllables. ...
Draconis's user avatar
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1 vote

What diphthongs are available are Unicode ligatures?

As far as I'm aware, there are no ligatures for ei, ui, or eu in Unicode. In general, Unicode only provides codepoints for ligatures when they're commonly-used and have semantic meaning. In Old ...
Draconis's user avatar
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