13

I've found I quite enjoy reading Ovid—his work is poetry, not prose, which adds a bit of difficulty, but the mythological subjects are pretty familiar, which makes it easier to deal with unknown words from context. And his style feels more transparent to me than e.g. Vergil's. I usually translate with The Latin Library open in one window and Perseus's word ...


10

Macrons are mainly pronunciation guides, telling which vowels are pronounced long. In some cases they can resolve ambiguities, when two words only differ by the length a vowel. Using them is not necessary, and I would personally consider it better style not to use macrons when writing in Latin, unless there is a special reason. Macrons were not used in ...


10

One slightly offbeat option would be Asterix. It's not quite classic literature, but it's well written and fun.


9

Personally, I think that you should, in that accent marks are helpful. But: (a) Plato wouldn't have known what an accent was, anyway, the whole thing being a conspiracy by later schoolmasters This is true—but the "conspiracy" was just to write down the way things were already being pronounced. The accent marks were meant to be descriptive rather than ...


9

The PHI Classical Latin Texts Database http://latin.packhum.org The Packard Humanities Institute provides free access to Latin Litterature texts from the beginning to ~200 AD. There are currently two functions for searching through the database. It can be involved by using some keywords : You can refine a search with logical operators. & and | or ...


9

One option, perhaps best alongside other approaches, is to read (and listen to) the Latin news broadcast Nuntii Latini. News come in every week and concern matters you have likely encountered in other media. The texts are fairly short and aimed at a broad readership. Unfortunately the vocabulary is not all that well documented. The authors of Nuntii Latini ...


7

Vox Latina by W. Sidney Allen (2nd edition, 1978) is the standard book for pronouncing not just Classical Latin, but noted variants, as well. The book is a companion to Vox Graeca, and is a reconstruction of how it would be pronounced according to a variety of sources. While it's a work of scholarship, it's easily accessible to undergraduates and other ...


7

A good place to start is at http://ephemeris.alcuinus.net/ This is a sort of newspaper with all kinds of contributions, from jokes and cartoons to serious current news items and fiction. It is edited by a Polish academic and is published from Warsaw. The Latin isn't always perfect, because contributions are accepted from anyone with a basically sound ...


6

Unfortunately you do need to memorize the perfect stem for each verb you learn. Many verbs are similar, and it helps a lot that many first conjugation verbs have the -v- in perfect forms. But not all have, and I can't think of a reliable way to tell when a first conjugation verb is going to have an irregular perfect stem. Especially when it comes to the ...


6

I don't know of any studies specifically about this, but I can give you two reasons for expecting writing to help. Here is classic psychological experiment from the days of behaviorism.* One group of rats, the "active rats", was allowed to explore a maze and find food in the usual fashion—learning by reinforcement. Another group, the "passive rats", was put ...


6

You can't read Latin proficiently without knowing these pronouns: they're all very common, and the meaning of a sentence often hinges on their precise form. That said, their declensions are complicated and tend to be something students of Latin come back to again and again until they're mastered. So you don't necessarily need to stop here until you've ...


6

One resource for learning Latin pronunciation is Nuntii Latini, the Finnish Latin news broadcast. The pronunciation is very clear and the news items are also available as plain text, making it easy compare the written and spoken word. When the show is not on a winter or summer break, it produces 5 minutes of news every week. It is not presented as study ...


6

This is a meta-answer on How to find Latin corpora? Go to the Virtual Language Observatory (run by the European Union financed CLARIN project), search all resources and restrict the search to Latin Language and Resource type Corpus. On the day of writing this answer, this search yields 26 hits. The corpora are of very different nature and often contain ...


5

It takes a long time to master Latin poetry, and a lot of practice in reading before you can attempt to write it. The metrical schemes are not hard to follow, but declaiming the poems as the classical poets intended is just about impossible, since we can only guess at the true sounds. The big difference from modern European, as you probably know, is that ...


5

The Latine version of Wikisource Wikisource can be a good idea, as I think its code is pretty good standardized — as an illustration, books can be exported in many formats with this (experimental) feature: http://tools.wmflabs.org/wsexport/tool/book.php. Furthermore, the corpus isn’t limited to classical Latin (there you can find works of Newton for ...


5

If you're so inclined, I'd suggest the Latin Bible. The syntax tends to be fairly straight-forward, and it's easy to consult English translations for comparison.


4

This may not be for everyone, but I personally read one articulus of the Summa Theologica by Thomas Aquinas every day. It can be found online at corpusthomisticum.org, and there is an English translation at CCEL. Each articulus is nicely bite-sized, just the right thing over a cup of coffee. The structure is extremely regular and repetitive, which helps in ...


4

My native language is also Spanish, and I first found a book called Método para aprender Latín of Hermann Schnitzler. It covers the fundamental grammar, but some explanations are brief and sometimes the examples are somewhat complicated. However, it was helpful. I would recommend you Wheelock's Latin to learn the grammar and Lingva Latina for practicing ...


4

The Latin Library is one possibility. It is very light, consisting of simple HTML pages with no unnecessary features. There are no additional features, just the Latin texts. Some might argue that also necessary features are missing, but that is always a matter of taste. The corpus has a large collection of texts which can be found following the links. There ...


4

The only thing I can suggest is to become a regular reader of the standard specialist journals. A good start would be with these ones: https://www.jstor.org/publisher/classical


4

When learning/teaching a foreign language, reading, writing, listening and speaking -even if they have a lot in common, i.e., the language itself- are considered different skills. That's the reason why, for example, the TOEFL is structured the way it is. Opportunities to listen to native or fluent Latin speakers are (depending on what you call fluent) ...


4

To learn a language properly, I would argue that it is necessary to read texts in that language. If you only ever translate from your native language to the new language, your view is too limited. Every language has features you would hardly think of if you only translated to that language. It is not enough to produce (be it speaking or writing), but you ...


4

[I think this is more properly a comment, but I'm making it an answer because it's too long, yet supplements Ben Kovitz's excellent contribution.] Over the years I've discussed this very topic with members of a Latin reading group, which includes teachers of Latin. All agree that, to beginners, the compressive effect of 'doing into Latin' from English is ...


4

For Ecclesiastical Latin, I am using audio published by Familiae Sancti Hieronomi, a religious community with a special charism for the Latin language: http://www.hieronymus.us.com/Venalia/IndLatin.htm My experience is with their Cursus and their recording of the book of Psalms. These are specifically Ecclesiastical Latin materials, which is great if that ...


3

I'd suggest a bit of background reading before you take the plunge. 'A Natural History of Latin' by Tore Jansen would be a good place to start: it is an excellent survey of Latin and its history, demonstrating very gently how to approach it while introducing the accidence and syntax in a general, but very positive, way. If nothing else gives you an appetite ...


2

Hathi Trust is a large database of digitilised texts from universities all over the world (kind of an academic version of archive.org). Everything (as far as I know) is searchable. For "Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum", there are many results. The first page shows volume 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7.


2

Here's a new opportunity with regard to Ecclesiastical Latin. On June 8, 2019, Vatican Radio started broadcasting Hebdomada Papae, notitiae vaticanae latine redditae (The Pope's week in review: Vatican news bulletin in Latin), a 5-minute weekly news bulletin airing every Saturday. The programme is curated by Alessandro De Carolis, head of Vatican Radio, ...


2

Subscription only (available mostly to institutions): Brill Online Reference Works De Gruyter (includes Journal of Latin Linguistics and excellent New Perspectives on Historical Latin Syntax four-volume series, among other things) John Benjamins Oxford Scholarship Online databases, like ProQuest and EBSCO Free: Academia


2

The best resource list I know of is this one from Justin Slocum Bailey of Indwelling Language. Check especially the section titled "Fairly simple Latin reading material." Here I've selectively reproduced part of the list and added a few of my own recommendations. These resources are modern Latin readers designed to help students practice reading. They are ...


2

I have used "Cornélie, ou le latin sans pleurs", by Salomon Reinach (1912), and liked it. This may be older than you were looking for. But if I remember Wheelock rightly, I think Reinach has a similar jaunty, chatty tone and an emphasis on reading short, typically edifying, passages. It's available online through the Bibliothèque nationale de France. He ...


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