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Can a subjunctive verb ever be modified by οὐ? (Greek)

A subjunctive is practically never negated with οὐ. The only systematic exception I can find -- and even this is rare -- is in Homer, where the use of the subjunctive is somewhat different from Attic;...
TKR's user avatar
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10 votes
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Are the present and future imperative used together?

In Allen & Greenough p.284; section 449 (Imperative Mood): "Phyllida mitte mihi, meus est natalis, Iolla; cum faciam vitula pro frugibus, ipse venito" (Ecl. 3.76); "Send Phyllis ...
tony's user avatar
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9 votes

Negative Future Imperatives

Negative future imperatives do indeed exist. A great many can be found in the laws of twelve tables. Example: Hominem mortuum in urbe ne sepelito Do not bury a dead person in the city Judging ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
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Future Imperative of Deponents: 3 or 4 existing forms?

You are right to note that a form is missing. It should be there, as there is no obvious reason why the passive voice (or, more importantly, deponent verbs) should not have it. But according the best ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
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Difference between future participle and simple future

In A Grammar of the Latin Language, Karl Gottlob Zumpt says, But by the combination of the participle future active with the tenses of esse a really new conjugation is formed denoting an intention to ...
Expedito Bipes's user avatar
7 votes

Difference between future participle and simple future

As Allen & Greenough (§499) points out, one nuance that this participle can express is 'likelihood or 'certaintly.' Sometimes, this certainty is so strong, that it even seems to approach ...
cnread's user avatar
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The use of subjunctive in the future

Tenses of the subjunctive The subjunctive is also known as conjunctive — these two words are synonymous in Latin grammar. The subjunctive mood has four tenses: present (faciam), imperfect (...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
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Is memento(te) semantically a future imperative?

mementō is formed from the reduplicated perfect stem (IE *me-mn-), not from the present stem (IE *men-). Thus, morphologically it is a perfect imperative, not a future imperative; the latter is always ...
fdb's user avatar
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Can a subjunctive verb ever be modified by οὐ? (Greek)

Pretty much never. LSJ's entry on οὐ mentions οὐ + subjunctive only once: ...with subj[unctive] in fut[ure] sense, only in Ep[ic], “οὐ γάρ τίς με βίῃ γε ἑκὼν ἀέκοντα δίηται” 7.197; “οὐκ ἄν τοι χραίς ...
Draconis's user avatar
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6 votes
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Questions for Regulus

I'll address each question in order: Translation of "pencil" Regarding the translation of "pencil" (French: "crayon"), the word is graphis, -idis, which is a Latinization ...
brianpck's user avatar
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Why the future perfect tense in "quamdiu se bene gesserit"?

In Gustavus Fischer's Details of Syntax, a number of pages are devoted to the uses of tenses in temporal clauses. It is fairly dense reading, but the most pertinent section is sec. 578, rem. 61. I ...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
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Are the present and future imperative used together?

The following is found in the writings of Bernardino Stefonio: abi: requirito hominem ubi ubi est.
Expedito Bipes's user avatar
5 votes

Questions for Regulus

[1] For graphida, you would have had to recognize the classic 3rd declension ending -is, -idis, which is common among words of Greek origin. That makes the word in question graphis, which can mean a ...
cmw's user avatar
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Declensions and Conjugations in Latin

Those aren't dashes in the middle of the word, they're a typical way to say a word has multiple possible endings. What's atypical is the parentheses, it would be more sensible to write ablaturum, -am, ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
5 votes

Can a subjunctive verb ever be modified by οὐ? (Greek)

I don't believe it is possible. A quick scan of the article in Liddell Scott Jones gave only this: with subj. in fut. sense, only in Ep., “οὐ γάρ τίς με βίῃ γε ἑκὼν ἀέκοντα δίηται” 7.197; “οὐκ ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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What are the θη-future and θη-aorist?

These terms are presumably intended to refer either to all aorist passives and future passives, or possibly to just the ones with a theta, a.k.a. "first aorist passives" and "first future passives". ...
TKR's user avatar
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Future: why -am instead of -em?

This is not exactly a sound change, but a substitution: this -am is originally that of the 1sg. subjunctive, which for some reason came to replace the expected -em of the 1sg. fut. There's actually ...
TKR's user avatar
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What is the origin of the future suffix -b-?

Main question: they come from the same PIE root. The verb fīō comes from (the zero-grade of) the PIE root *bhuH-, "to become". This led to a Proto-Italic verb *fui-. In Proto-Italic, the ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes

What is the origin of the future suffix -b-?

Side question: fīō and faciō seem to be unrelated. Faciō "to make" comes from the Proto-Italic root *θaki-, probably from PIE *dheh₁ "put" (compare Greek tí-thē-mi, English "...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes

What are the θη-future and θη-aorist?

Yes, that is correct. The only tenses/stems that can get θη are the aorist passive and the future passive: the others have passive meaning expressed by the middle voice (this being Greek, there will ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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What is the difference between futurum exactum and futurum simplex?

From what I understand in the comments, where you say 'amabo' is futurum simplex and 'amavero' is futurum exactum, what you are actually asking about is the difference between what most Latin scholars ...
David's user avatar
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3 votes

Declensions and Conjugations in Latin

Whatever chart you're using expects you to know the forms derive from the future active participle ablātūrus, so you should read them as ablātūrum, ablātūram, ablātūrum since they're just the ...
Miracula's user avatar
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Future infinitive active in indirect discourse

Yes, and in this case "future" means in the future with respect to the main verb. So if you translate sentences like "I said that you would like that steak" or "I am saying ...
C Monsour's user avatar
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What is the difference between futurum exactum and futurum simplex?

Futurum Simplex (simple future, future imperfect) The simple future, amābō, is the most common future tense. It refers to something which is going to happen in the future: "I will love". In ...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes

Using two future tenses together

Your specific question allows it, so would you be interested in avoiding the construction with a conjugated verb ? If you are, you might consider a few options, some of which are admittedly arcane and ...
blagae's user avatar
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Using two future tenses together

I will try to add to my answer with a more grammatical explanation if I have time, but for now I can introduce some sample phrases. These examples come from the Lewis & Short entry for donec: ...
brianpck's user avatar
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3 votes

Is 'volo' ever used with a future infinitive?

Has anybody come across a wish with a future infinitive or something comparable? It is certainly not easy to come across an example of a future infinitive with the verb volo, since there are other ...
Shootforthemoon's user avatar
2 votes
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Future actions happening in sequence

Such a list of events in sequence gets a bit boring if you use the same structure again and again. Sometimes this is good for clarity or emphasizing repetition. There are several structures to express ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
1 vote

Difference between future participle and simple future

The periphrastic future tenses are often used to convey the subject’s intention at the time of the auxiliary verb. venturus sum = I intend to come venturus eram = I was intending to come But you are ...
MPW's user avatar
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How would I translate the future passive for the verb Video, videre: to see?

It is all but meaningless to translate a single word. If your teacher does not think so, ask him or her to translate the English word “have” to Latin, or Spanish, or Chinese, or any other language; it ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar

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