19 votes
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Are there examples of passive imperative forms of non-deponent verbs in ancient literature?

It is rare to find a true (i.e. non-deponent) passive imperative, because the idea of ordering someone to do something is opposed to the idea of having something done to you. Pinkster, in Oxford Latin ...
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14 votes
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Can a verbum deponens go along with an accusativus?

Yes, a deponent verb can have an accusative object just like non-deponent verbs do. If I threaten someone with something in Latin, then alicui aliquid minor. The person (or other entity) being ...
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12 votes

Why is nominative instead of ablative absolute used in 'Ibi egressi Trojani'?

Egressi Trojani is in the nominative because it's the subject of agerent. The structure of the sentence is a bit unusual, but it's clearer when you move the cum to its vanilla position before the ...
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11 votes
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How to make a deponent passive in meaning?

Good question! I am not aware of a possibility of passivizing such a structure. Instead, I suggest two ways around this: Use a different verb. Depending on context, perhaps comitare, haerere, or ...
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10 votes
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Are there classical examples of the imperative patere?

I don't know of a good way to distinguish patere from patēre in a corpus search, so I think you have three choices: Look through the results. Come up with another search that captures what you are ...
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10 votes
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How do I use gerundives of obligation for deponent verbs?

Before we understand the gerundive of a deponent verb, we need to first understand the particples of deponent verbs. Participles of Deponent Verbs Deponent verbs are often described as verbs with &...
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Are Deponent Verbs a feature of the Latin Language or Means of Translation?

Indeed, historically deponents are descended from a middle/reflexive voice. In historical usage, though, deponents lost this, and can take a direct object. See e.g.: te sequor aggredior hominem te ...
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9 votes
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Future Imperative of Deponents: 3 or 4 existing forms?

You are right to note that a form is missing. It should be there, as there is no obvious reason why the passive voice (or, more importantly, deponent verbs) should not have it. But according the best ...
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9 votes
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Is the perfect participle in deponent verbs active or passive in meaning?

190b. The perfect participle generally has an active sense, but in verbs otherwise deponent it is often passive: as, mercátus, bought; adeptus, gained (or having gained). As I read it (with the help ...
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9 votes
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When and where was the non-deponent form of verb "miror" used?

The Lewis & Short entry for miro indicates that it is an “ante-classical form of miror”. Combining the examples in this entry with those found in An Etymological Analysis of Latin Verbs, I have ...
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9 votes
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Formation of participles from deponent verbs

The present stem is persequ-: this can be found by removing -or from the end of the first person active singular persequor. It is a consonant stem, which gets an -e- in present participles: persequens....
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7 votes
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Why is dignetur used as if it were in the active voice?

digno and the deponent dignor are both used in the same meaning "to deem worthy", but the latter is much more frequent. L/S have a separate entry for each of them.
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7 votes

Are Deponent Verbs a feature of the Latin Language or Means of Translation?

The morphosyntactic behavior of Latin deponent verbs differs from that of passive non-deponent verbs for a few non-finite forms/constructions, where deponent verbs are conjugated the same way as ...
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7 votes

How can we say "a forgotten war" in Latin?

The poets seem to have noticed this gap, and repurposed oblītus to fill it. So saith Vergil himself (Eclogues IX.53-4): nunc oblita mihi tot carmina, vox quoque Moerim / jam fugit ipsa Now all my ...
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6 votes

What is the difference in meaning/usage between "nasciturus" and "nascendus"?

In his Corso elementare di lingua latina ("Elementary Latin course", 1844), Vincenzo De Angelis deals with this in Volume 1, p. 191: Se il verbo indica azione vi sarà il passivo, come amo ...
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Comparing verto and vertor

There is no separate vertor; they're the same word. However, it's not truly passive. Verto in the passive can have a middle sense, i.e. where you are the actor doing the action to yourself. The OLD ...
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6 votes

Are there examples of passive imperative forms of non-deponent verbs in ancient literature?

For what it's worth, this shows up sometimes in Church Latin. "Surge, illuminare Ierusalem" -- "Arise, be enlightened, O Jerusalem".
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Deponent verb participle gender

It is the second option with arbitrata. For the purposes of agreement, you can think of the participle as an adjective, so that Syra arbitrata est and Syra Romana est have exactly the same form. The ...
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5 votes

What is the origin of the deponent verbs and their evolution in Romance languages?

Most of the time, deponent verbs in Latin come from the Indo-European middle voice, which had pretty much completely died out by Classical Latin times. But in other Indo-European languages, such as ...
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5 votes

Gone But Not Forgotten

FWIW, Google attributes the quote to Calvin Coolidge rather than the Emperor Maurice. Anyway I see a couple of issues with your translation: eius should be a form of the reflexive suus; obliviscor ...
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5 votes
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Can you split "natus sum"?

I looked into how Caesar uses past participles and est. His style is considered good and he does not aim for anything particularly convoluted or poetic, so I think he is a good choice for this ...
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5 votes
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Are future active participles of deponent verbs used in place of future passive participles? Why?

The same happens with all deponent verbs in Latin. The Latin participle system is defective for a transitive verb like amare:   Active Passive Past — amatus Present amans (amandus) Future amaturus ...
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5 votes

Parsing "oblita carmina"

Lewis and short cite this very passage as an example of oblisci being used passively. So there's your answer, "forgotten songs": http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%...
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5 votes

Parsing "oblita carmina"

The practice of using deponent participles in a passive sense occurs with other verbs besides obliscor, as noted by Ethan Allen Andrews and Solomon Stoddard in A Grammar of the Latin Language: For the ...
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4 votes

Do non-deponent Latin verbs ever have a "middle voice"?

Thinking about your very interesting question ("That is, do we ever see non-deponent verbs with passive morphology, but able to take accusative direct objects and not able to take ablative agents?"), ...
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4 votes
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What is the uncontracted form of "κεῖμαι"? (Greek)

The verb κεῖμαι isn't a contract verb like θεάομαι or ἡγέομαι (or a 'regular' verb like λύω); it's an athematic verb like τίθημι, δίδωμι, or ἵημι, but deponent. So, the circumflex isn't showing ...
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4 votes

Is there something like an "anti-deponent" verb in Latin?

Another common example that comes to mind is vapulo, -are, which means "to be beaten." In at least one case cited in L&S from Quintilian's Institutio Oratoria, vapulo can even be paired ...
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4 votes

Is there something like an "anti-deponent" verb in Latin?

These are the textbook examples: Fio (and its compounds) functions as the passive of facio (and its compounds). It even can take an agent. But it has some passive forms (fieri, factus sum). Veneo ...
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  • 396
4 votes

Is there something like an "anti-deponent" verb in Latin?

I would argue that iacēre is of this kind. Morphologically it is fully active, but semantically it can be seen as a passive form of iacĕre. Lewis and Short describe it as "to be thrown" and ...
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4 votes

How can we say "a forgotten war" in Latin?

Hic renovabo illud, quod ad interrogatum pristinum respondi, propositum persimplex: bellum oblitteratum Vocabulum «oblittero» infrequentissime dicitur litterate, immo solum fere tropice utitur ...
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