16

The verb Catullus uses is odisse, not odire (from which you would get an imperative odi). This verb only has forms in the perfect system but the meaning is that of the present system. That is, what is the present active indicative by meaning is odi, odisti, odit, odimus, odistis, oderunt — perfect active indicative forms. This is one of the defective verbs ...


13

Joonas's answer is entirely correct, but to give a slightly different explanation: Some verbs in Latin are defective. Some of their forms are outright missing, for no obvious reason. For example, the verb ait "say" is always cited in the third person singular present—because most of the other forms we'd cite don't exist! It has no first person ...


9

It's a regular neuter accusative singular form, modifying aevum: ...you alone of the Italians ventured to unroll all of time... The ablative singular form would be omnī. 'Alone (out) of all the Italians' would be something like unus ex omnibus Italis or unus omnium Italorum. An ablative singular wouldn't work here (even if the form were ablative ...


6

I've been told that the first syllable of abiciō is long by position, because it's actually an underlying *abjiciō, which causes it to be syllabified as *ab-ji-ci-ō before the *ji simplifies to i. So the first syllable has a coda consonant, despite the next syllable being headless. That's different from the account that I've heard. According to Alex B.'s ...


5

You are correct that celerrimus can and should be translated as a noun. Allen & Greenough has a section dedicated to Adjectives used substantively. You don't make it explicit in your question, but it is possible that the real source of confusion is that celerrimus has two expected characteristics: It is nominative, although the surrounding structure is ...


2

Libelli is in the genitive of quantity, used after a noun of quantity to specify "of what." In addition to strict quantities like libra ("pound"), Latin uses this genitive with indefinite quantities, often "substantivized adjectives or pronouns in accusative or nominative," e.g. quid, multum, plus, nihil, etc. A classic example ...


1

To me the most natural positions for caesuras in hendecasyllabic verse are before either of the consequent short syllables: - - - | u | u - u - u - u. This is similar to how caesuras work in hexameter, never coinciding with with the start of a metron. My preference for reading caesuras like this may have well been influenced by reading hexameter. But, more ...


1

It appears as if celerrimus is adjectival, in apposition to phaselus, but it's often argued that this is a mistake of transcription : that it should in fact have been celerrimum, as the accusative to follow the infinitive fuisse. After neque, a further acc. + inf. follows fuisse in impetum . . . nequisse praeterire. Phaselus was a kind of long bean-pod, and ...


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