Hot answers tagged

10

Ah, the joys of scansion! My understanding of the subject is solid but very basic, so I'll give you what I know, in the hope that somebody else can elaborate. The Caesura in Ancient Poetry The basic unit of Latin poetry is the foot: iamb, trochee, dactyl, anapest, spondee, amphibrach. A line of dactylic hexameter is made up of six dactyls (a long syllable ...


3

There are really two senses of "caesura", one of them objectively definable, the other not so much. Most basically, a caesura is defined simply as any word break in the line that occurs within a foot, rather than at a foot boundary. (The opposite of a caesura is a diaeresis, which is a word break that corresponds to a foot boundary.) In this sense ...


3

As a supplement to qwertxyz's answer, which gives the correct scansion, I'll note that this line fits into the scheme described in D.S. Raven, Latin metre §66: The 'weak' third foot caesura is far less common in Latin than in Greek ... [I]n the most developed type of hexameter verse ... it is nearly always combined with 'strong' caesura in the fourth foot ...


2

Here is the correct prosodic scan of this holodactylic verse: sṓlĭs ĕquī́, | sŏlĭtā́quĕ || iŭgū́m | grăvĭtā́tĕ cărḗbat


1

To me the most natural positions for caesuras in hendecasyllabic verse are before either of the consequent short syllables: - - - | u | u - u - u - u. This is similar to how caesuras work in hexameter, never coinciding with with the start of a metron. My preference for reading caesuras like this may have well been influenced by reading hexameter. But, more ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible