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11

Let me offer a translation attempt piece by piece. My translations are not perfectly literal, but the way I build it up should clarify what it each Latin word does. I reordered the words to make the organization clearer. It has proven quite useful to try to identify the core clause and expand little by little in both languages at the same time. Nondum pinus ...


10

The C is a -que. It is quite common to abbreviate neque (= ne+que) as nec. I see two ways to parse that verse and interpret the C: And he noticed the goddess and said: "Don't go further!" And he noticed the goddess, said: "And don't go further!" (I didn't read around that verse, so the translation may not be optimal. But that's beside the point.) The ...


9

Of course, as with so much in Latin, there's more than one answer, none of them incorrect. The first answer is yes, using hic and ille like this to mean "the latter" and "the former" is common and correct. Here's Cicero in De Amicitia: Scitum est enim illud Catonis, ut multa: 'melius de quibusdam acerbos inimicos mereri quam eos amicos qui dulces ...


9

When hic and ille are used like this, they refer to the distance of words: hic refers to the closest noun, ille the one that came first. In your example, you have first pontus and then aer. Hic therefore refers to the one closer to the pronoun, and since aer is closer to hic than pontus, it must refer to that. Likewise, since pontus is further away than aer,...


8

Necnon can be written as two words, "and not not"; it has a positive meaning because of the double negative. It can be translated as and with an appropriate adverb, such as and yet, and in fact. The enclitic -ve works just like -que, except that it means "or" rather than "and".


8

Quam here is being used as a normal relative, and could not be replaced with illam, since the relative clause quam non invenit umquam is the accusative subject of the verb esse in the accusative and infinitive construction introduced by putat in the main clause. A literal translation is: "[the one] whom (quam) he does not find anywhere, he believes to be ...


8

I'd like to offer an addition, which was originally posted as a comment but requested to be turned into an answer by OP. As explained in the other two answers, iste, ille and hic are used to refer back to the items of a previous enumeration. In that sense, "the former ... the latter" is a perfectly acceptable translation. However, in your example this ...


7

The form of mutastis is called a "syncopated perfect." From Gildersleeve, section 131: The perfects in āvī, ēvī, īvī, often drop the v before s or r, and contract the vowels throughout, except those in īvī, which admit the contraction only before s. The syncopated forms are found in all periods, and in the poets are used to suit the metre. As far ...


7

Nocendo is a gerund (noun) here, not a gerundive (adjective). Therefore, it's active in meaning. It's ablative to show the means by which Juno does good. Quae is f. nom. sing. and refers to Iunonem, who is the 'I' of the relative clause. ...I who alone do good by doing harm (Note that sola couldn't be the object of nocendo (or the agent, because nocendo, ...


6

Here's a rewording solutis versibus by Daniel Crespin: Nondum abies ex montibus suis desecta descenderat in aquas fluidas, ut terras alienas adiret : et nulla littora nisi sua hominibus perspecta. That probably clarifies a lot, especially that suis modifies montibus and that caesa modifies pinus, but here are a couple other notes. Thomas Swinburne Carr ...


6

The subject is altera [nympha]: another [nymph] threw her arms under the cast-off robe The verb subicio is normally used with a nominative (the thrower), an accusative (the thing thrown), and a dative (that under which the accusative is thrown). In this case, arms are thrown under robes. You translate subicio as "throw to/on", but the prefix sub- ...


6

To expand on Joonas's answer, I think he is 100% correct that mirata is elliptical; est is left out but must be assumed in order to translate the sentence. The structure is as follows: Iuno despexit in Argos et mirata [est] nebulas volucres fecisse faciem noctis nec sensit [nebulas] remitti tellure We have three parallel main clauses here, ...


5

(Edited drastically from previous version after several rereadings of the passage.) Mirata means mirata est. It is not a plain participle, but a perfect form of a deponent verb. It governs an ACI, whose infinitive is fecisse. (And even if you read mirata as a plain participle, it can still govern an ACI.) The next clause also has ACI: non esse nec remitti ...


5

Ad 1: I would not be surprised if it were a genitive: Tempe as a grove of Thessaly sound unremarkable enough. However, there are two other options. The first is a locative: there is a grove in Thessaly. That would be semantically good, but the locative is not normally used with regions in prose (rather than with cities and small islands). Lastly, it could be ...


5

Hmm. I find your analysis elegant and alluring, but I wonder whether it's simpler than that—could it be working from two slightly different senses of vetāre? You're far more versed in the lexicon here than I am, so I'm really just offering this as something that occurs to me in case it didn't occur to you, not as any kind of authoritative answer. Could it ...


5

I think protector is fine and understandable. Normally a good thing needs to be protected in order to prosper, and vindex is not seldom so translated. The word comes from vim "force" and dico "say, tell, proclaim", resulting in a basic meaning "to assert authority, to enforce". The translation "enforcer" therefore comes to mind first. But there must be ...


5

The full sentence from Ovid goes like this: Nōs qvoque per totum pariter cantābimur orbem, juncta-qve semper erunt | nōmina nōstra tuīs. My translation: Songs will be sung about us, too, throughout the whole world, and my name will always be joined to yours. Nōstra "our" here is a poetic replacement for mea "my"; tuīs is in the dative, the thing ...


4

It appears that concrescere, meaning "thicken" or "condense", is an intransitive verb, meaning that it will not take an accusative direct object. Most intransitive verbs take dative indirect objects, which represent the object that a certain action is directed at. Thus, rigido rostro would be in the dative. The only verbs that I can think of which take ...


4

You're parsing the line correctly -- a more literal translation would be "...to speak of forms changed into new bodies". Doesn't it come to the same thing? Io's form was changed into the new body of a cow, or her body was changed into the new form of a cow. Maybe the latter sounds a bit more natural, but I wouldn't say the former is backward. And of course ...


4

So much the hardest part of your question lies in trying to select something representative of Ovid that I was tempted to reply 'everything and nothing'. Ovid was something of a poet's poet, which is to say that his work is generally of a standard high enough for others to aspire to. In his earlier work he is a source — often the only source — for much of ...


4

I would translate that as "I will do as I can". Perhaps "I will do all I can" or "I will do as well as I can" would be more idiomatic English, albeit less direct. You have two verbs in future tense: faciam (I will do) and potero (I will be able to). Between then is ut, which has a number of meanings. The meaning intended here seems to be that of a relative ...


4

Of course, this is a very interesting question. From a purely chronological point of view one could imagine that Ovid might have run across a copy of the Septuagint and read there of how Noah’s ark came to rest on ὄρη τὰ ᾿Αραράτ. Having said this, I do not see that there is any evidence that the Septuagint, or any other version of the Hebrew scripture, was ...


4

What you quote are lines as they appear at http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/ovid/ovid.met1.shtml . My own copy is the 1909 Teubner edition "cum emendationis summario", and, for what it's worth, it differs from the lines you have quoted: (545) 'Fer pater' inquit 'opem! Tellus,' ait, 'hisce, vel istam / (545 ! ) Quae fecit, ut laedar, mutando perde figuram?' /...


3

In this case, it is a normal relative use of qui, but with the antecedent (like [eam] quam) included in the relative pronoun. You could translate it literally as "but he thinks [her] whom he does not find anywhere to be nowhere", relative clause in italics. Although it doesn't apply here, using qui as a demonstrative/personal pronoun is not uncommon. The ...


3

Yes, that sounds correct. It could be argued that the dativus commodi is the most common use of the dative, and it can be translated in various ways. In this sentence, in honour of their brother is good.


3

It seems to me that there's a strong reason to take quod non potuere vetare with the following line, namely, that their parents could and did forbid it! The whole point of the story is that their parents forbade the marriage, which is why it all ends in tears. It would be strange to say "They would have got married, but they didn't, because their parents ...


3

A number of 19th-century textbooks suggest "avenger". For example, Thomas Swinburne Carr writes: Vindice, avenger. So the minister of justice was termed. Writing in Latin, the 17th-century commentator Daniel Crespin suggests: Vindice.] Punitore. Nulli enim tum erant judices, nulli lictores, nulli rerum capitalium vindices, nec ulli carceres. Crespin ...


3

I have never used this specific text myself, but Loeb Classical Library has some really great texts with side by side translation and some helpful notes. I personally have some of these texts for some of Cicero's works and they are really nice in that way, and the translation provided is not so literal where it sounds mechanical, but literal enough where you ...


3

It's very common for Latin to use an adjective in the nominative, agreeing with the subject (or in the accusative, agreeing with the direct object), where English idiom would instead use an adverb. Although the adjective may sometimes be in a 'marked' position (e.g., at the end or beginning of a clause, and/or separated from its noun) to suggest that it's ...


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