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What's the deal with Ov. Met. V, 414

The C is a -que. It is quite common to abbreviate neque (= ne+que) as nec. I see two ways to parse that verse and interpret the C: And he noticed the goddess and said: "Don't go further!" And he ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
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A question on line XV.167 of Ovid's Metamorphoses re 'eque'

First, note that the first vowel must be long, to fit the meter: spīritus ēque ferīs humāna in corpora transit This rules out the vocative of equus, which has a short vowel there. Instead, this ...
Draconis's user avatar
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Is there something special about "corpus"?

Here corpora is what's sometimes called a Greek or synecdochical accusative (in Greek the accusative of respect). Stellatus actually goes with the person whose body it is, and the accusative is the ...
cmw's user avatar
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How to translate these few lines? Met. 1.94–96

Let me offer a translation attempt piece by piece. My translations are not perfectly literal, but the way I build it up should clarify what it each Latin word does. I reordered the words to make the ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
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What does the phrase "nec non" mean? (Metamorphoses I.612-614)

Necnon can be written as two words, "and not not"; it has a positive meaning because of the double negative. It can be translated as and with an appropriate adverb, such as and yet, and in fact. The ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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What do "hic" and "ille" refer to in this passage from Ovid's Tristia?

When hic and ille are used like this, they refer to the distance of words: hic refers to the closest noun, ille the one that came first. In your example, you have first pontus and then aer. Hic ...
cmw's user avatar
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How do I scan the hexameter "faunique satyrique et monticolae silvani"? (From Metamorphoses I, 193)

You're right, the -e in the first enclitic is long. The reason is obscure, but is accessible in Allan and Greenough's (rev. Fowler 1890) student commentary on the Metamorphoses: faunique : the ...
cmw's user avatar
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10 votes

Translating Ovid's Fasti 1.149–150

Gildersleeve & Lodge, Latin grammar, section 254.2 (in the discussion of the indicative mood) states: The Impf. as the Tense of Disappointment is sometimes used in these verbs [= verbs that ...
cnread's user avatar
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What do "hic" and "ille" refer to in this passage from Ovid's Tristia?

I'd like to offer an addition, which was originally posted as a comment but requested to be turned into an answer by OP. As explained in the other two answers, iste, ille and hic are used to refer ...
CompuChip's user avatar
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What do "hic" and "ille" refer to in this passage from Ovid's Tristia?

Of course, as with so much in Latin, there's more than one answer, none of them incorrect. The first answer is yes, using hic and ille like this to mean "the latter" and "the former&...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
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Canonical version of Metamorphoses

Yes, you can define verses precisely. The Metamorphoses are written in dactylic hexameter, and so each line is constructed with the same rules. You can check the line numbers for yourself on PHI or ...
cmw's user avatar
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Unusual grammar in Ars Amatoria 1.509 f: 'a nulla tempora comptus acu'

Theseus is a nulla tempora comptus acu, whose parts can be understood as follows: Comptus is roughly "tied together". Acu is a normal instrumental ablative, "with a pin". ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
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Is a relative pronoun commonly used as a third person pronoun? (Metamorphoses I.583-587)

Quam here is being used as a normal relative, and could not be replaced with illam, since the relative clause quam non invenit umquam is the accusative subject of the verb esse in the accusative and ...
TKR's user avatar
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"Nam vos mutastis et illas" (Ovid)

The form of mutastis is called a "syncopated perfect." From Gildersleeve, section 131: The perfects in āvī, ēvī, īvī, often drop the v before s or r, and contract the vowels throughout, ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
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How to understand 'quae prosum sola nocendo'?

Nocendo is a gerund (noun) here, not a gerundive (adjective). Therefore, it's active in meaning. It's ablative to show the means by which Juno does good. Quae is f. nom. sing. and refers to Iunonem, ...
cnread's user avatar
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Why does ‘lūdīs’ end in a short syllable in Ov. Ep. Sapph. 16?

It is a second-person singular verb form lūdis, “you play” (lūdō, lūdere).
Asteroides's user avatar
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"Aurea prima sata est aetas" - is there ambiguity here?

None of the first 5 words in your passage is in the ablative case. As you note, scanning the line will reveal this fact. Aurea is an adjective ('golden'/'[made] of gold'), not a noun ('gold'), and ...
cnread's user avatar
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How to scan "nempe tenens, quod amo, gremioque in Iasonis haerens"

As often with tricky verses, the key is in the name. The only way I can scan that right is reading the name as Ĭ-ā-sŏ-nĭs. The initial I/J of a name can easily vary between vowel and consonant in ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
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How is this perfect passive participle being used?

This is sometimes known as the "accusative of body parts", where an accusative noun indicates the body part (or more generally, the part of something) where an action takes place. They (nom) ...
Draconis's user avatar
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7 votes

Feedback on my Latin note an a passage from Ovid’s Metamorphoses

This looks very good to me! Just a couple of small suggestions for the last sentence: I think his auditis would be more usual than haec audiens, which would imply simultaneity with the main verb ...
TKR's user avatar
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How would "Eurystheus" be scanned in Ovid's Metamorphoses?

The second syllable of Eurystheus is heavy (it's followed by two consonants), and because ευ is a diphthong in Greek -theus is a single syllable: –́ ⏑ ⏑ –́ – –́ ⏑ ⏑–́ – –́ ⏑ ⏑ –́ ⏑ ...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
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6 votes
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'Subiecit' meaning in Ovid Metamorphoses III 167?

The subject is altera [nympha]: another [nymph] threw her arms under the cast-off robe The verb subicio is normally used with a nominative (the thrower), an accusative (the thing thrown), and a ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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How to make sense of this standalone infinitive? (Metamorphoses 1.601—603)

To expand on Joonas's answer, I think he is 100% correct that mirata is elliptical; est is left out but must be assumed in order to translate the sentence. The structure is as follows: Iuno despexit ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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How to translate these few lines? Met. 1.94–96

Here's a rewording solutis versibus by Daniel Crespin: Nondum abies ex montibus suis desecta descenderat in aquas fluidas, ut terras alienas adiret : et nulla littora nisi sua hominibus perspecta. ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
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How to scan "nempe tenens, quod amo, gremioque in Iasonis haerens"

Just to make it clear what Joonas said explained in his post, here is the line scanned out: nempĕ tĕ/nens, quŏd ă/mo || grĕmĭ/oqu' in ĭ/asŏnĭ/s haerens The reason the initial letter of ...
cmw's user avatar
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6 votes

What's this gerundive doing here?

It's a gerund, not a gerundive. Gerunds are verbal nouns, and you actually translated it as so: "[in/by] going." Sicaniam repetit, dumque omnia lustrat eundo, venit et ad Cyanen. She ...
cmw's user avatar
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5 votes
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What's the best translation of "vindice" in Met. 1.89?

I think protector is fine and understandable. Normally a good thing needs to be protected in order to prosper, and vindex is not seldom so translated. The word comes from vim "force" and dico "say, ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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Pyramus et Thisbe: did their parents forbid what they could not? Ovid, Metamorphoses IV.61

Hmm. I find your analysis elegant and alluring, but I wonder whether it's simpler than that—could it be working from two slightly different senses of vetāre? You're far more versed in the lexicon here ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
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Did Ovid know of Mt. Ararat?

Of course, this is a very interesting question. From a purely chronological point of view one could imagine that Ovid might have run across a copy of the Septuagint and read there of how Noah’s ark ...
fdb's user avatar
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How to make sense of this standalone infinitive? (Metamorphoses 1.601—603)

(Edited drastically from previous version after several rereadings of the passage.) Mirata means mirata est. It is not a plain participle, but a perfect form of a deponent verb. It governs an ACI, ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar

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