6

This is actually a continuation of my last question. The following sentence is a little tricky, and I feel I may have missed a thing or two. I appreciate any feedback.

"Etiam hac hora difficillima", inquit, "nobis vis invenienda est talem vitam vivendi, qualem eam esse volumus, scilicet liberam et apertam".

Nuntii Latini (12/23/2016)

Here's my translation:

"Even on this difficult hour," she says, "the strength must be found by us to live life such as we want it to be, namely, open and free."

I'd like to get your opinion on some liberties that I took. First, I understand "vivendi" to be a gerund in the genitive, in which case a more literal translation would be "the strength must be found by us of living life such as we want it to be". Is it okay to render this as "to live" as opposed to "of living"? Is it common to do so?

Second, the "talem...qualem" pair was a little confusing. I thought about translating "talem vitam" as "such a life", instead of what I ended up doing, "life such". The former sounds like a more literal translation. After all, doesn't "talem" have to modify "vitam"? The latter, however, sounds more idiomatic in English. Which would you choose here?

5

I think your translation is very good and you have taken no unnecessary liberties.

The only bit of information that is missing is the superlative.

One other small improvement could be made by translating dative + gerundive + form of esse as "we must find", which is, I believe, the standard translation.

  • Ah, right! It should be "Even on this most difficult hour". It's good to know about the standard translation of nobis invenienda est. Although it helps to think of it in terms of "must be found by us", as it helps a beginning student (myself) learn the grammar of gerundives. – ktm5124 Dec 30 '16 at 1:05

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