Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [translation-check]

The tag has no usage guidance.

4
votes
1answer
47 views

“I came, I saw, I am playing” = “veni, vidi, ludo”?

This came up as an idea for a team phrase for a sports team. The purpose would be to convey that people visited, joined, and are still playing the sport. (Disclaimer: I know almost nothing of Latin.) ...
4
votes
1answer
35 views

Can someone check my translation?

I'm trying to translate an epitaph and I have no idea if I'm even close to right. It sounds really clunky at best. Can someone check it? Here's the original: stirpe fui, forma, natoque, opibusque, ...
5
votes
2answers
62 views

Checking translation of “ubi vitam amavisti, illuc reverteris”

I heard once someone say: "where you loved life, there you will return". My attempt to translate that into Latin is ubi vitam amavisti, illuc revertēris Is that correct? Or is there a way to ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

A translation into Latin of the medical term “curative intent”

Would ‘destinatus ad sanandum’ be a good translation of the medical term 'curative intent'? The phrase 'curative intent' is used specifically for cancer patients where the surgeons or oncologist ...
4
votes
1answer
46 views

Checking translation of “optimus magister is fuit qui scivit quid discipuli peterent: auxilium”

I would like to know if this sentence is correct: optimus magister is fuit qui scivit quid discipuli peterent: auxilium What I would like to say in English is: "The best teacher was the one who ...
6
votes
1answer
129 views

How do you translate 'nega frequenter'? Is it 'deny frequently' or 'rarely deny'?

This is not a straight translation question. I am asking this because the above phrase, from 'Concede parum, nega frequenter, distingue semper' seems to be rendered by some unofficial sources (see ...
5
votes
3answers
3k views

Is this “Veni vidi vici” spin-off translation correct?

Sorry if this question seems silly, I do not know Latin... I wonder if someone can help me with the proper translation for: "I came, I attended, I left" With the help of google translate i got ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

What does “Pulchre vive, vehementer somina, ardenter ama” mean?

I am getting a Latin tattoo so want to ensure that the Latin phrase is accurate before I get it inked! The Latin phrase is: Pulchre vive, vehementer somina, ardenter ama. Apparently, this means "...
4
votes
1answer
65 views

Plus quam umquam sciebas oblitus sum

Please check if my translation is correct for this phrase: I have forgotten more than you ever knew: Plus quam umquam sciebas oblitus sum Is the word order correct, or should I put oblitus sum ...
4
votes
1answer
92 views

Irradians sata læta

Here are the first three lines of the 2nd of the Prophetiæ Sybillarum, that of the Sybilla Lybica, set to music by Orlandus Lassus, with an English translation from Wikipedia. I haven't sorted out ...
3
votes
1answer
59 views

Translation check: propter scientiae amorem

The good people over at latindiscussion have been helping me with a project I'm working on. Now that I'm nearly finished, I would like to double check the results. Take the motto: "propter scientiae ...
4
votes
2answers
95 views

How to say “me importa un comino” (or equivalent) in Latin?

In Spanish there is a whole array of phrases of the type: Me importa un comino. where the word "comino" can be replaced by many alternatives (e.g. pito, pepino, bledo, etc). This phrase, in a more ...
0
votes
1answer
79 views

Can you please fix the mistakes in translating these prayers from Koine Greek to English (Part 2 of 2)?

This is a continuation from this question I do not know nearly enough Koine Greek to point out what I am specifically unsure about. That said, I do know enough to see that the Greek and English texts ...
-1
votes
1answer
69 views

Can you please fix the mistakes in translating these prayers from Koine Greek to English (Part 1 of 2)?

This question is continued here I do not know nearly enough Koine Greek to point out what I am specifically unsure about. That said, I do know enough to see that the Greek and English texts do not ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

How to say “of the” as in “Church of The Blessed Virgin” with the sense of “belonging to” or “patronage”?

I would be glad if anyone could help me how to translate the name "Church of the Virgin Mary" or at least how to place "of the" in the sense of "belonging in patronage" in such contexts? Other ...
2
votes
2answers
151 views

Anima ad infinitum or anima infinita?

Which phrase is correct, anima ad infinitum or anima infinita? I want to say boundless soul, infinity soul.
6
votes
2answers
355 views

“Every Branch Shares The Same Root” - having trouble translating “Shares”

I'm having trouble translating "every Branch Shares The Same Root" into Latin for a school emblem. so far I have "OMNE GENERE CONSOCIARE QUOD IDEM RADIX" also this is a bit long for a school emblem ...
4
votes
1answer
106 views

How do you translate this sentence (I thought I knew something, then I realised I knew nothing) to Latin?

I want to translate "I thought I knew something, then I realised I knew nothing" into Latin. The result I got from Google translate is this "Quod cogitavi cognovi: tunc animadvertebam nihil scirem." I ...
3
votes
1answer
156 views

Does this translation make sense?

I am in charge of a professional chiropractic fraternity, and I would like to have coins made with the Latin version of "sincere fellowship in chiropractic medicine" on the coin. This is the best I ...
5
votes
1answer
53 views

Translating “Mother's son” into Latin

Could you please help me translate "mother's son" into Latin? From my understanding it is "filius matris" but I am not 100% sure.
1
vote
1answer
47 views

Out of the primeval spirit of place Sertor made it, 2237

For an inscription: Out of the primeval spirit of place Sertor made it, 2237 EX·GENIUS·LOCI·PRIMAEVVS·SERTOR·FECIT·MMCCXXXVII Is it correct? Thank you for your help.
4
votes
1answer
64 views

How to get “almost everything” from “vix non quaedam” in this translation of a sentence from J.J. Fux?

I'm trying to understand an English translation of a Latin sentence from J.J. Fux's Gradus ad Parnasum (written in Latin in 1725). Here is the sentence: Tuâ aviditate, quam tamen laudo, fit, ut ...
5
votes
1answer
61 views

Translation: Out of my death, new life

I took a Latin course a few years ago, and now I'm trying my hand for a friend's tattoo. Is my translation of the title correct? English: Out of my death, new life. Latin attempt: Ex mei mortis ...
6
votes
1answer
45 views

Adding translation of “potential” to “ad infinitum”

The phrase "ad infinitum" is often used in texts that are otherwise non-Latin. I would like to use a variation of this phrase in an English text. In philosophy of mathematics there is a distinction, ...
6
votes
2answers
322 views

Latin translation of ‘Strength, love and light’

I know people tend to advise against having tattoos in other languages but I have given it a lot of thought and definitely want it doing. I am hoping to have a tattoo that translates into ‘strength (...
5
votes
2answers
76 views

Translating “do the next thing” to Latin

I would like to use the phrase "do the next thing" as a motto for some literature. Does the translation FACITE DEINDE REM work? The thought is basically this: we should get active with the next thing ...
4
votes
1answer
80 views

Translating: “Christ Jesus Ultimate King & Ruler for All Time”

I have considered that this may be stated: "Christī Regēns", emphasising with a capital R and being pronounced actively ruling. Is this sufficient to state? I wonder that is is not more like, "...
6
votes
1answer
49 views

How might I write a latin phrase for swapping bodies?

Putting together a small literary piece where an item is inscribed with a Latin phrase that hints that it can be used to swap bodies (or minds, depending, I suppose, on your perspective) with another ...
6
votes
1answer
106 views

Does this text make sense?

I am writing a text to be sung by a small chorus for a recording, and I need a check on my Latin use, as I'm a less active student of the language than others, and don't entirely trust myself to nail ...
5
votes
1answer
74 views

Is “ut ostendo sursum” an accurate Latin translation of “keep showing up”?

I'm hoping someone can help with confirming a translation, or suggesting an alternative, of “keep showing up” into Latin. Google translate and a few other online translators have suggested ut ostendo ...
7
votes
2answers
484 views

Correct paraphrase of “navigare necesse est” to “angling is necessary”?

Is 'piscantur necesse est' a correct adaptation of the well-known Plutarch maxim 'navigare necesse est'? I would like to say "angling is necessary", but I am unsure whether it remains correct after my ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

How to write “Stand on the shoulders of giants” correctly? [duplicate]

I know that "nanos gigantium humeris insidentes" is "dwarves on the shoulders of giants". But what is the properly written way of saying either "on the shoulders of giants" and/or "standing on the ...
6
votes
1answer
79 views

How can this English to Latin translation be improved?

I took a look at the chat and saw many comments in Latin, most of whom I could not decipher immediately. So I tried to point that out, and why not do it in Latin. The problem is that I have ...
3
votes
1answer
62 views

Proper use of De Jure and De Facto in the context of “what is” and “what is right”

I work in IT. For a long time I've said to my team "Build for de jure, change for de facto". Meaning: Build a perfect world version, change it to fit the way things are. An example: When planning ...
5
votes
1answer
77 views

“I am divided. I am balanced. I am one.”

I was hoping someone with more experience in Latin could help me confirm whether this translation is correct or not: Ego sum dividitur. Ego sum libratum. Ego sum unum. Does this translate properly ...
3
votes
1answer
46 views

Translating the 道德經 into Greek

I’m currently doing Chinese winter school, and I thought I would try to translate the first line of the daodejing into Greek, as a fun exercise. Can you help correct my grammar? :) ´ο λογος τουτον ...
4
votes
1answer
83 views

Can I write 'Ecce Esse!'?

Is 'ecce esse!' acceptable Latin for 'Lo, to be!'? I've tried looking online for answers, but I've not found anything definitive either confirming or disconfirming that it is, though I do not have ...
5
votes
2answers
138 views

Is “responsum est dilectio” the correct translation for “love is the answer”?

Is "responsum est dilectio" the correct translation for "love is the answer"? The translation comes from Google Translate, but I can't find any proof or usage of the sentence which kind of makes me a ...
6
votes
1answer
73 views

The proper phrase with “adeptus”

As far as I know adeptus means "the one who achieved something", in participial form. mēta means "goal" or "turning point", figuratively. What is the proper combination of them with the meaning "the ...
5
votes
1answer
44 views

Ex Occulto Unitas — is that the correct syntax for a motto?

I have little knowledge of Latin grammar — and few resources in Japan. I am attempting to create a fictional agency in a novel and its accompanying motto: From Secrecy, Unity. My attempted ...
5
votes
1answer
77 views

Translation verification

I’m wondering whether my translation is correct. I wrote: tempus fugit; sed muscae fugiunt etiam. I meant for this to mean: Time flies, but flies fly too. I really don't have any knowledge ...
4
votes
1answer
149 views

Arx celebris fontibus

I bought yesterday a bottled mineral water, of the Harrogate brand, which label states: Harrogate's motto 'Arx celebris fontibus' translates as 'a citadel famous for its springs'. (this is the ...
4
votes
0answers
34 views

Translation help, especially with “cum bello cupiendo”

I found the following translation exercise online: To say nothing of Philip, whom he rendered an enemy to the Romans, though at a distance from him, Antiochus was the most powerful of all kings ...
4
votes
2answers
140 views

“Impetuum perseverantia” - “Persevere in endeavours” motto for coat of arms

I would like to check translation of a motto that would read "[we] persevere in endeavours/resolve". I consider using either persto or persevero. The latter seems better to me as it resonates with ...
6
votes
1answer
210 views

Did I translate this correctly?

Did I translate this passage correctly? Is there something that could be corrected or improved? Original: Where other men blindly follow the truth, remember, nothing is true. Where other men ...
5
votes
2answers
84 views

“Escape from New York” movie - title and tagline translation check

I have a "Escape from New York" movie poster over my desk. It reads: 1997.New York City is a walled maximum security prison.Breaking out is impossible.Breaking in is insane. ESCAPE FROM NEW ...
5
votes
1answer
158 views

What would be the correct translation for “Out of few, many”?

I'm looking for a modification of the famous slogan E pluribus unum which translates to Out of many, one and is the traditional motto of the United States. Instead I want to say Out of few, many. What ...
5
votes
1answer
88 views

Translating Jefferson's quote on priests and science

I'm trying to translate Thomas Jefferson's sentence "priests dread the advance of science as witches do the approach of daylight." After several discussions with my dictionary, I've come to a version ...
3
votes
1answer
107 views

What is a good Latin translation for No Rulers?

What is a good Latin translation for "No Rulers" as an isolated motto? Only thing I can find is Nec Principes.
8
votes
2answers
572 views

Is it acceptable/regular to use diacritics (macron) in written texts?

I'm building the brand for a web development company, and I'm using Latin for the name and slogan. However, as I am not familiar with the language, I would like some help clarifying meanings to avoid ...