Questions tagged [translation-check]

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2
votes
1answer
49 views

Salsissimum futura erit - is this right?

I need this translation for an artwork "future will be salty" Salsissimum erit futura Salsissimum futura erit it's a joke for an illustration of Diocletian announcing the salt as payment.
3
votes
1answer
63 views

Is “whatever you say, do” an accurate translation of “quodcumque dixerit facite”?

Background: The Latin phrase, quodcumque dixerit vobis facite, taken from John 2:5 of the Vulgate, translates to, Whatsoever he shall say to you, do ye, according to the Douay-Rheims ...
3
votes
2answers
85 views

What is the closest latin wording for “Work to solve”? Opus solvere?

Contextually, it is the idea that work/effort should always be done with the goal of finding the solution to a problem or hurdle. Google suggests "Opus solvere" and the component words seem to make ...
18
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3answers
11k views

How does “It's totally fucked” translate to Latin?

The closest I can manage (uneducated) is "Prorsus Futui Est," but I suspect that's somewhat (if not completely) wrong.
4
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1answer
169 views

Life and death in Latin

I want to use "Life and death" in Latin as a title for an important writting, but I want to make sure its translation and context is correct: Is this the correct way?: Vitam et Mortem
3
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1answer
143 views

How to say 'I am myself'?

I'm still figuring out the difference between the various ways to say 'I', 'me', and 'myself' in Latin. My best guess for this phrase is 'Ego sum memet', but I'm not sure which case the second word ...
2
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1answer
126 views

“Facilis descensus averno” or “descensus averno facilis est”?

I have always seen "facilis descencus averno" as the translation for "the descent to hell is easy", but I saw it written as "descensus averno facilis est" and I'm in doubt now. Which one is correct?
3
votes
1answer
116 views

Trying to make a corny comeback in latin, also happen to be clueless in latin

One of my friends always has this status that goes "Per aspera ad abyssum" a variant of "Per aspera ad astra", though noticably more cynical and pessimistic. I thought of "Through difficulties to ...
4
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1answer
3k views

Does this Latin book state that the meaning of the Arabic word ةلم is huc?

Does this Latin book (p.471) state that the meaning of the Arabic word ةلم is 'huc'? I'm asking it because it doesn't understood to me if it's the meaning or maybe the book just gives the ...
6
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2answers
155 views

Seneca’s Epistula Moralis XLI: “God” or “a god”?

The Loeb translation by Richard M. Gummere of Seneca's Epistula XLI, "On the God Within Us": Non sunt ad caelum elevandae manus nec exorandus aedituus ut nos ad aurem simulacri, quasi magis ...
6
votes
2answers
300 views

Looking for a reference in Greek

I am afraid I might be off topic here, but I do not know whom to ask otherwise. I have come across the following sentence: ᾽Αεί τι βούλου χρήσιμον προσμανϑάνειν. I found it on the cover of a (...
7
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5answers
2k views

A variation on Caesar

We just moved into a new house, and my cat was very quick to make herself comfortable. I described her approach as "I came, I saw, I took possession" and of course that got me to wondering what that ...
2
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1answer
46 views

Translation of “the past shall live” into Latin

I am translating the motto, "The Past Shall Live" into classical Latin. Currently, I have Praeteritum Vivet, which I think makes sense, but I'd appreciate the input of those more skilled than I.
3
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2answers
78 views

Translate “Crater Lake” into classical Latin

From what I have read of this post, Latin doesn't really use nouns as adjectives in the way that English does, although that post mentions you can use a noun in genitive case to achieve this. I am ...
1
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1answer
105 views

A Client Submits Feedback On Her Prostitutes

I am trying to translate the following line, inspired by a fatuous Roman spoof, "Plebs", in which two hapless new recruits to a cadre of male prostitutes, the "Knights of Eros", are being debriefed, ...
3
votes
1answer
93 views

Translation to Latin of “everything is revenge”

I'm trying to translate a phrase. I'm trying to say "everything is (part of) revenge", as in "every action is an act of revenge against the ones that tried to break you". Sorry if it's not too clear ...
6
votes
1answer
378 views

Translate “loyal animal” into classical Latin

I am translating the short phrase "loyal animal", or "faithful animal" into classical Latin. In this case, "animal" is intentionally very broad - I don't want to limit it to just domesticated animals ...
3
votes
1answer
149 views

“If you can breath, you can stand. If you can stand, you can fight.”

I'm trying to help my sister. She heard this phrase that she like to have tattooed but she wanted it to be in Latin. Now I haven't been practicing for a few years so I could use with some help. The ...
3
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2answers
50 views

Indirect questions and the passive subjunctive

How would you translate: "He asked if the the city had been captured?" Quaerit num civitatem captum esse? Here I am using an accusative (captum) plus infinitive (esse). Am I right? Thank you!
10
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1answer
2k views

Translate “Everything burns” into classical Latin

In a project of mine I have an event which was named "everything burns", or potentially "Everything burned" (I am open to both tenses). What would this be in classical Latin? I tentatively have this ...
11
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3answers
5k views

How do you translate “Don't Fear the Reaper” into Latin?

In T. Pratchett's Discworld series, Death's motto is "Non Timetis Messor", meant to be a translation of "Don't Fear the Reaper". But in other books he uses "Timetere", and I am unsure of which would ...
7
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2answers
1k views

Translate “iconoclast” to classical Latin

I am translating "iconoclast" into classical Latin. It was translated into Ecclesiastical Latin as Iconoclasta, but I would rather translate it from the original Byzantine Greek meaning of image-...
5
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1answer
199 views

Meaning of “Pater non hic est, sed Marcus hic est”

In Capitulum Tertia of Hans Ørberg's book LLPSI, he has the following conversation snippet taking place between a mother, Aemilia, and her children: Aemelia Quintum Interrogat: "Ubi est Iulius? Cur ...
7
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2answers
96 views

How to translate “it's right to leave this world better than you found it”?

Would that be "Dignum/Iustum est mundum reddere meliorem quam inventum/invenis"? Vale! P
4
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0answers
131 views

World War One: Opening Moves

On Q "We Are Triumphant While Our enemy Sleeps" the comment was made: "Remember the Schlieffen Plan? Brilliant; inspired gamble; but, it could have only have worked if the belligerent nations had ...
2
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1answer
82 views

Translate “New Moon on Monday” to Latin

What would be the correct translation of the song title "New Moon on Monday" to Latin? Word for word with the same structure as English seems like it would be something like "Nova Luna in dies Lunae", ...
1
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1answer
55 views

Is the phrase “Ars gratia physicae” correct?

Is the phrase "ars gratia physicae" correct? What does it mean? Could it mean "Art for physics' sake"?
1
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1answer
115 views

Advice From History

The rise of right-wing (fascist) parties, in too many parts of Europe, is as concerning as it is disturbing. Totalitarianism, with its seductive promise of simplistic solutions, always seems to have ...
2
votes
1answer
52 views

Is “iudicatus per historia” a correct translation for “judged by history”?

Im not sure about the usage of the "per" preposition, but this translation seems to be pretty straight forward. Is this correct?
3
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1answer
87 views

Imperial Chariot Racing

In the made-for-TV re-make of "Ben Hur", Hugh Bonneville played Pontius Pilate. At one point "Pilate" said: "Chariot-racing is not a sport for amateurs. And to compete and to lose would be worse than ...
2
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0answers
105 views

“Tears in rain” monologue in Latin

I've just read a Latin translation of the famous "Tears in rain" speech in the Blade Runner film. See its source in: I've seen things... "I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships ...
1
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0answers
47 views

Translating Religious Apology

I want to write this in Latin: Without malice. (The) reign of God* The kingdom of God. God's grace through man's grace. God's worship through man's honor. Love God but ...
1
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2answers
102 views

Second vs. third person in future imperative for a general rule or maxim

I am trying to translate "plan [in order] to achieve" into Latin. Is it more appropriate to use second ("meditator ut consequaris") or third person ("meditator ut consequatur") in future imperative ...
2
votes
2answers
125 views

Is this correct? dicunt somnia, sed oblivisci malorum sunt somnia nimis

dicunt somnia, sed oblivisci malorum sunt somnia nimis Does this translate to : they say dreams come true, but forget that nightmares are dreams too
2
votes
1answer
52 views

Would Patronum be an appropriate name for a Classical Christian School Kickstarter platform?

I am a web application developer. I am working on a platform similar to Kickstarter or GoFundMe to support individuals or teams who want to start or transition to a Classical Christian School. I see ...
2
votes
1answer
148 views

How to translate “A moment in my arms, a lifetime in my heart” for a tattoo?

I’m in need of some help with a translation from English to Latin. I’m in the middle of designing a tattoo and the client wants the sentence ‘A moment in my arms, a lifetime in my heart’ to be ...
4
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0answers
63 views

Alternative forms in second-person singular present active subjunctive [duplicate]

I am trying to translate "plan [in order] to achieve" into Latin. From the dictionary it looks like both "meditator ut consequaris" and "meditator ut consequare" are grammatically correct. Are they, ...
10
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4answers
3k views

Request for a Latin phrase as motto “God is highest/supreme”

I'm looking for someone that can help me produce a correct, coherent Latin phrase for a school project to be used as a motto, similar to the Marine Corps motto Semper Fidelis, etc. I would like the ...
3
votes
1answer
381 views

How would one say “always learning in Latin?”

I'd like to translate the phrase "always learning" into Latin. I think it would be something like SEMPER DISCENS, but am not sure... What is the proper translation?
3
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2answers
78 views

Is ulcantur a subjunctive of ultus?

I have a prayer I say every morning. It includes the word ulcantur. I can't find a translation. I think it is a subjunctive for ultus? O Piisima Virgo Maria, quæ caput serpentis contrivisti, protege ...
0
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0answers
33 views

is there anything grammatically incorrect with this prose poem?

If you have prosody suggestions, appreciated also. Voces retendantur usque primaevum, Per ducenta regna atavorum, Masoni Domino, cuius megalithus etiam praedicat: Deo erexit ego. Recto obelisco ...
2
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2answers
118 views

“Luck is for the unprepared”

"Luck is for the unprepared" is my personal motto. I have tried to translate it but I'm not confident that it has not been translated as "Luck is a gift to the unprepared", whereas I am looking for a ...
9
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1answer
427 views

Tantum religio potuit suadere malorum – Lucretius

I saw this quote in someone's forum sig file (signature): "Tantum religio potuit suadere malorum." - Lucretius Curious, I consulted Google Translate, which my professional translator brother cautions ...
3
votes
1answer
222 views

What is the translation for: “for those I love I will sacrifice”

How can I translate "for those I love I will sacrifice" to Latin? I got several different answers from different sources: prō meīs nihil nōn patiar prō dīlēctīs nihil nōn patiar Iillis quos amo ...
4
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1answer
1k views

Socratic Paradox

According to the Wikipedia page of the Socratic paradox 'I know that I know nothing', Latin version of the same is — 'Scio me nescire' (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_know_that_I_know_nothing). ...
2
votes
1answer
102 views

Nominativus cum infinitivo

Can somebody please tell me if my translation for the sentence: "It seems that the slave is carrying a letter." is correct? Videtur servus epistulam portare. videtur - 3rd person present passive ...
3
votes
1answer
99 views

English to Latin translation

I'm a beginner in Latin language studies, and I wanted to translate a sentence from English to Latin. I'm a self-taught student, and since it's for something important, I'd like it to be right. The ...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

Translation of “invincible independence”

I wanted a phrase that means something like "invincible independence" or "undefeatable independence". Google Translate gave me: "invicta independentiae". I just wanted to check that that seems ...
8
votes
1answer
405 views

Is crescere the correct word meaning to to grow or cultivate?

I am creating a program that helps people learn a growth mindset and “grow” into what they want to become. Is crescere the correct word meaning to to grow or cultivate?
2
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2answers
98 views

Trouble with the adjective “my”

Was looking to do an inscription on a ring for my fiance (engagement ring) Mei Uxor animusque My (plural m) wife (f) and soul(m) The -que implies that these things are close together by making ...

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