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Given a word in Attic, Doric, Koine, or pretty much any other Greek dialect, I can usually find information on it through the Perseus morphological analyzer.

However, Perseus doesn't cover Mycenaean. If I have a word written in Mycenaean, such as a-ja-me-no, is there any sort of online reference work that maps it to a meaning, a later Greek cognate, or a Proto-Indo-European root (or ideally all three)?

(I'm sorely missing the university library right now, and any online resource would be helpful, even if it's not especially up-to-date.)

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For mapping Mycenaean Greek words to their meanings, the Linear B Lexicon has a searchable list of terms. Here's the entry for a-ja-me-no:

a-ja-me-no Chadwick & Ventris 1973: inlaid masculine nominative singular Aura Jorro 1985: a) aplicado a cajas de carros (KN Sf) b) un nombre de materia cf. e-re-pa-te pa-ra-ku-we ku-ru-so etc. c) la parte del objeto afectada o del motivo empleado aplicado a piezas de mobiliario cf. a-di-ri-ja-pi po-ni-ki-pi etc. Bernabé & Luján 2008: inlaid always followed by a material in the instrumental Chadwick & Ventris 1973: feminine nominative singular Aura Jorro 1985: el mismo que a-ja-me-no Aura Jorro Francisco 1985 Diccionario Micénico vol. I Bernabé Alberto and Eugenio Luján 2008 A Companion to Linear B: Mycenaean Greek Texts and their World (editors Yves Duhoux and Anna Morpurgo Davies) ""Mycenaean Technology"" Chadwick John and Michael Ventris 1973 Documents in Mycenaean Greek kar WNXIV.164 participle candidates

Another good site is DĀMOS, which has a searchable database for Mycenaean texts. The instruction page is here. However, I don't see the meanings of the text given anywhere.

Without selecting any filters, I entered your search term a-ja-me-no, and here is a partial screenshot of the results:

enter image description here

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    Yeah, DĀMOS says they're manually annotating the texts with later Greek cognates and PIE etyma, but unfortunately that part doesn't seem to be publicly available. The database itself is still wonderfully helpful though! – Draconis May 9 at 17:33

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