Questions tagged [reference-request]

Questions requesting a specific reference to a word, grammatical construct, or other language element, such as in the writings of a particular author.

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How to translate Ἀγαθῶν ἓνεκα οὐ γίνεσθαι

How should the following (highlighted) quote of Socrates be translated? Here's the relevant sentence: Thus Socrates said of the Civil law, Ἀγαθῶν ἓνεκα οὐ γίνεσθαι. I came up with the following in ...
4 votes
0 answers
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What are classical examples where prepositional ad phrase is inside ad purpose clause

This question is triggered by another question about wheatear the "ad" is prepositional or purpose. In theory, we should see examples where something like this happens: Discipuli Marcum ad ...
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6 votes
1 answer
100 views

Reference for "divide et impera"

The motto "divide et impera" is often attributed to Caesar (I don't want to spam here some low quality references, simply made a Google search). Wikipedia says that The maxim divide et ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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On the etymology of Lacedaemon

King Lacedaemon was the son of Zeus and of nymph Taygete. He married Sparta, daughter of King Eurotas of Laconia. I would like to know more about the etymology of Lacedaemon. The daemon part is easy. ...
2 votes
1 answer
160 views

Determining the etymology of words in Latin

I am interested in the etymology of words in Latin. Is there a resource available that could help me determine if a word is specifically from Old, New or Vulgar Latin etc. according to a time it is ...
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2 votes
0 answers
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Ut syllabās gravēs verbōrum didicimus?

Hanc rēgulam didicī dē verbīs: Sī syllaba paenultima brevis est, syllaba antepaenultima gravis fit. Sī autem longa est, ipsa gravis fit. Ut hanc rēgulam didicimus? Ex grammaticīs? Quō tempore haec ...
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9 votes
1 answer
1k views

What does "tom. i." mean?

I'm seeing the following abbreviation in several book/manuscript citations, particularly in religious works, but I have no idea what the abbreviation means. From the context of where I'm finding it, I'...
7 votes
1 answer
922 views

Olympic oath : The crown or death (?)

In a Wikipedia article about the Olympics, I read the following sentence (my translation) Finally, the pleasure of participating is alien to the Greek ideal, for which only victory is worth winning, &...
5 votes
1 answer
435 views

Where can I look up Mycenaean words?

Given a word in Attic, Doric, Koine, or pretty much any other Greek dialect, I can usually find information on it through the Perseus morphological analyzer. However, Perseus doesn't cover Mycenaean. ...
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6 votes
2 answers
348 views

Citation needed for "Casta placent superis..."

I am trying to read the poems of Pope John Paul II. They are sprinkled with references to the Vulgate. But two Latin lines, Casta placent superis; pura cum veste venite, et manibus Puris sumite ...
2 votes
1 answer
112 views

What are some of the major words that we use in English directly (unmodified) from Latin?

I am looking through the Wiki page on Latin words used in English, but they mostly consist of words like "lux" and "terra", words that are sort of used in English, but really have that Latin feel to ...
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4 votes
2 answers
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Information on the Penates

I'm writing a passage analysis on Vergil's Aeneid, III.103++, which includes the scene where Aeneas is visited by the Penates (household gods), which the Trojans have brought with them from Troy. As ...
2 votes
3 answers
1k views

Two Sappho-related reference requests

As some of you will definitely know, I have been grappling with Sappho for a long time. Lately, I have come to an impasse in a couple places, where I have said all I can without a specific reference I ...
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3 votes
2 answers
133 views

Using genitive and infinitive to describe characteristics

Answering this question, I recalled a somewhat rare construction used to express that an action is characteristic of someone. Pekkanen's Ars Grammatica (§77.1) gives two examples: Cuiusvis hominis ...
8 votes
1 answer
1k views

Understanding a reference to Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum

On page 33 of Companion Animals & Us, there is a line: I am in tears, while carrying you to your last resting place as much as I rejoiced when bringing you home in my own hands fifteen years ...
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7 votes
2 answers
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How do I access the Oxford Latin Dictionary online?

I'm using a university account to sign into Oxford Scholarly Editions Online (OSEO). To what 'widget' does the official webpage refer? Is it online? Must it be downloaded? A widget enabling users ...
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5 votes
1 answer
746 views

Reference for "Ab esse ad posse valet consequentia"

I came across Kant asserting the following in Metaphysik L₂: Ab esse ad posse valet consequentia; a posse ad esse non valet consequentia. This appears to be a very old precept that probably ...
7 votes
1 answer
376 views

Is there a canonical list of Latinized names?

I'm not only talking about names that existed during the classical period, but also the standard Latinization of modern European names; for example hugo, hugonis is the standard medieval Latin ...
2 votes
0 answers
68 views

Question related to "the tree of apples" in the Bible

Is it true that we tend to associate the tree whose fruit Eve convinced Adam to taste with an apple tree because of a certain translation mistake related to the word malum? Don't know how common this ...
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5 votes
1 answer
332 views

A textbook for Latin

What would be the one book recommendation you'd definitely give an individual interested in learning Latin? The individual would like the book to include a good overview of Latin at the very least; ...
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8 votes
1 answer
148 views

Are there literary attestations of werewolves in the Classical period?

The modern idea of werewolves seems to have arisen somewhere in the Middle Ages, after the spread of Christianity. But I vaguely remember a story in the Satyricon (specifically at Trimalchio's dinner) ...
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4 votes
3 answers
879 views

Is there a Latin source for "He who is able to laugh at himself, is invincible"?

Some time ago I came across a Latin sentence that roughly came down to: "He who is able to laugh at himself, is invincible" At the time I thought: Oh well, this must be a well known Roman saying (...
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7 votes
1 answer
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References of medieval ornithology terms

I was browsing through the Czech-Latin dictionary Glossarius by Magister Bohemarius Bartholomaeus de Solencia dictus Claretus, which also lists an impressive collection of zoology terms, and I found ...
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6 votes
1 answer
201 views

What is the largest known piece of Etruscan literature?

The Etruscans had a written language, and they must have had some kind of literature. Wikipedia gives a short mention. What is the largest known piece of Etruscan literature? It could be an epic poem, ...
8 votes
1 answer
201 views

What was the classic term for "damnatio memoriae"?

The Wikipedia article on the subject notes that the term damnatio memoriae, referring to the relegation of a person's name to oblivion, as if they never existed, is a neo-Latin expression first ...
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3 votes
0 answers
45 views

Can we find a quotation from an author containing the word μεγαρτός?

I ran into this this morning, and had an exchange in comments with the other answerer (after answering myself). The word μεγαρτός, I'm fairly certain, means "envied", being the -τος verbal adjective ...
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9 votes
2 answers
2k views

Is the prefix "di-" more Latin-like than "bi-"?

Question. (1) Is there anything close to scientifically-meaningful to say about whether the prefix "di-" is more Latin than the prefix "bi-", when indicating two-ness? (2) Are there published ...
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9 votes
2 answers
359 views

Books of reading medieval Latin manuscripts

I would like to learn how to read medieval Latin manuscripts, but they often use abbreviations/shorthand. What are some books that would help me read these manuscripts?
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7 votes
1 answer
147 views

Job 5.7 in the King James version

This extract from the novel 'Three Men in a Boat' refers to Job 5.7: This world is only a probation, and man was born to trouble as the sparks fly upward. I hoped to quote the source, expecting ...
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6 votes
1 answer
240 views

Semantic differences between Greek comparatives/superlatives of "good", "bad"

(This is more of a reference request than a question, since I'm looking for a more detailed discussion than is normal for an SE answer.) The Greek adjectives for "good" and "bad" each have several ...
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2 votes
0 answers
88 views

Learning latin, good books at beginner's level [duplicate]

I would like to learn Latin, starting from scratch. That is to say, I do not know anything at all about Latin. Which book would be a good one to start with?
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9 votes
1 answer
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Colors of the rainbow

The classical Latin word for a rainbow seems to be Iris (Iris or Iridis, f.). Did the Romans ever list or otherwise discuss the colors of the rainbow in extant literature? I asked about colors in ...
5 votes
1 answer
120 views

Ancient sources for singing in a bath

Years ago a fellow Latinist told me that singing in the shower is not a new invention. He mentioned some ancient (Roman, I believe) writer mentioning that singing is convenient while bathing due to ...
17 votes
2 answers
1k views

What colours did different colour words mean, exactly?

There are many different words for colours in Latin, but it's not easy to tell what kind of colour was exactly meant by each word. Do we know what different colour words meant? In particular, is there ...
18 votes
1 answer
2k views

On the etymology of “discipulus” and “disciplina”

I am interested in the origin of the words discipulus and disciplina, which have found their way into many modern languages, e.g., in the English words disciple and discipline. Unfortunately, there ...
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