Martin Kochanski
  • Member for 5 years, 2 months
  • Last seen more than a month ago
4 answers
12 votes
4k views
Request for a Latin phrase as motto "God is highest/supreme"
14 votes

The best phrase would be Deus optimus maximus, literally “God [is] best and greatest”. Not only is the meaning right but it has an ancient lineage which makes it perfect for this use. Iuppiter ...

View answer
1 answers
6 votes
180 views
Euler passage translation (Latin in 18th century)
Accepted answer
9 votes

This whole process of tuning will be seen more clearly from the attached figure. Since the notes E, B, G#, F#, D# and Bb are determined in two distinct ways – both by fifths and by thirds – a valuable ...

View answer
1 answers
6 votes
213 views
What does a red v with a dot above mean in the Misal rico de Cisneros (Spain, 1518)?
Accepted answer
7 votes

This is the "Versicle" character, Unicode 2123, "Versiculus", ℣ if your screen can display it. It is also possible that you may come across the "Response" character, U+211F, "Responsum", ℟, although ...

View answer
2 answers
6 votes
104 views
Is credulus a diminutive?
6 votes

According to Gildersleeve and Lodge, §182.1, ‑ulus is a regular former of adjectives from verbs. This particular formation indicates repeated action. They cite querulus and I could add bibulus. ‑...

View answer
3 answers
8 votes
479 views
What are the normal genitive and dative singular forms of "alius"?
5 votes

Gildersleeve and Lodge, §76.r1: The Gen. alīus is very rare, and as a possessive its place is usually taken by alienus. §76.r2: …usually make the Dat. Sing. in -ī … Alī is found in early Latin for ...

View answer
2 answers
3 votes
1k views
Translate "I made this" into Latin
4 votes

To take the Latin first: no. Hoc faciebam would mean "I was making this", as you say, but Hoc feceram would mean "I had made this" - that is, that the making is in the past with ...

View answer
2 answers
7 votes
280 views
Does "laudate" imply the morning part the day? (or are these translations wrong?)
Accepted answer
4 votes

The full name of Lauds is laudes matutinæ. In the Latin you quote, prout ipsa nomina can be taken either as referring to the vespertinity of Vespers only (Vesperæ being plural), or as referring also ...

View answer
1 answers
6 votes
99 views
Superlatives In Subordinate Clauses
4 votes

Their “superlative” here is just a convenient way of saying “the word primus”. Or, you might well think, an unnecessarily elegant way of saying it. It is not the superlativeness of the word which ...

View answer
2 answers
7 votes
205 views
How to translate "it's right to leave this world better than you found it"?
3 votes

encouraged to upgrade from a comment: Given the epigrammatic nature of mottoes, I wonder whether one needs to be explicit about either the fas or the world. What about simply “Redde meliorem”? It ...

View answer
1 answers
4 votes
139 views
Translate "collective unconscious" into Latin
3 votes

This isn’t an answer but (frequent excuse) it’s too long for a comment. One of the key indigestibilities of Aristotle, when we were absorbing him in the c13, was precisely the question of the ...

View answer
1 answers
5 votes
524 views
Are there linguistic arguments for the claim that "Odi et amo" in Catullus (LXXXV) cannot be translated as 'I hate and I love'?
3 votes

In English any verb which syntactically takes a subject can be reassumed by “do”. “I hate cod but she doesn’t” is perfectly natural even though no actual doing is involved. Indeed one of the puzzles ...

View answer
3 answers
7 votes
283 views
Is this a question or an affirmation?
3 votes

Wait for someone expert to give you an expert answer, but as someone whose Latin dates from the last millennium I’d say that both utrum and the subjunctive would push me towards an interrogative ...

View answer
3 answers
4 votes
227 views
Is there a descriptive modern Latin grammar?
3 votes

Latin as a living language is found in the documents of the Catholic Church. For example, the Institutio general is de Liturgia Horarum is almost 100 pages long and is a mixture of exposition and ...

View answer
1 answers
4 votes
171 views
Why aren't there more letters representing consonant digraphs in Greek?
3 votes

My feeling is that the "doubleness" is a bit of an illusion, conflating letters which seem "double" for different reasons. Ζ is a perfectly respectable single letter, a cognate of the Hebrew zayin. ...

View answer
1 answers
4 votes
112 views
Understanding a sacrifice in Horace's carmen 1.5
Accepted answer
2 votes

This is how it is read. But as for the “sacrificial” tradition, it is not a sacrifice but a votive offering in a tradition still practised in many parts of the Latin-speaking world. You promise God ...

View answer
3 answers
9 votes
256 views
Did Ovid know of Mt. Ararat?
1 votes

This story was ambient and Genesis is not the only source. We see it written in the Epic of Gilgamesh just as much as in the story of Noah’s Flood. Those few written occurrences, including Ovid, are ...

View answer