Leaky Nun
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2 answers
5 votes
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Does Ordericus/i end with a "us" or "i"?
7 votes

The nominative case is the form of the noun when it acts as the subject of a sentence. There is another case, called the genitive case, which is used to show possession. For example, "Marcus amat ...

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1 answers
4 votes
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"For all" and "there exists"
5 votes

First, there is no universal "Latin". Each era, or even each author, has their own style of Latin. According to Wikipedia, quantifiers ("for all" and "there exists") ...

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1 answers
7 votes
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Reservoir Dogs: "Let's go to work" in Latin
Accepted answer
5 votes

"Let's ..." is formed using the present active subjunctive first person plural form. Your sentence can be rendered as "let's work" or "let's go to [a figurative place called] work". There are two ways ...

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2 answers
3 votes
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Pronouncing "Superfluus"
Accepted answer
4 votes

The vowel lengths are: sŭpĕrflŭŭs. All four vowels are short. The nominative singular forms are: sŭpĕrflŭŭs, sŭpĕrflŭă, and sŭpĕrflŭŭm. Based on the endings -us/-a/-um, we can tell that it is short. ...

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1 answers
4 votes
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Appendix probi: "cannelam nun canianus"
4 votes

It was a typo. All of the online sources I find have been based on the book Sprachlicher Kommentar zur vulgärlateinischen Appendix Probi, but in the book it was correctly printed as non (Page 5 of ...

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