Shootforthemoon
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How can I say "school/university of life" in Latin?
2 votes

Schola vitae is attested, especially in Medieval Latin. Examples include Doctrina [est] schola vitae, or (from Ephemerides Liturgicae) Praxis genuina liturgiae est schola vitae interioris.

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Is there a diminutive form for agent nouns?
6 votes

Are there any existing diminutives of agent (-tor/-trix) nouns? Yes, though the rarest. Examples for -trix have been already mentioned by @Joonas and @cnread: nutricula, meretricula... I'd like to ...

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Trying to make a corny comeback in latin, also happen to be clueless in latin
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6 votes

"Per aspera ad abyssum et per abyssos ad caelum" Is this correct or will I make a fool out of myself? Yes, that's correct. You might also like Per aspera ad abyssum, ad astra per abyssum. ...

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Learn Ancient Greek or Latin first?
9 votes

My suggestion is to study Greek and Latin together, calmly, step-by-step, in order to see the differences and similarities between the two grammars and their usual constructs. This is also the ...

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How did 'apo-' shift from signifying 'off, away' to 'because of'?
0 votes

I think the answer is very simple and resides in the same meaning of such preposition as indicating origin and provenience. It literally means "from" and introduces the complement of "moving from", ...

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middle voice in Latin
4 votes

In this paper (a book actually) it is claimed that the analytic perfect reflects an inactive structure (p. 85). You might find it interesting; the author, Laura Migliori, also explores the syntax of ...

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What's the latin translation of " We must know, we will know "
1 votes

Ignoramus et ignorabimus is a Latin maxim coined by the German physiologist Emil Du Bois-Reymond (1818–1896) in his work Über die Grenzen des Naturerkennens (1872). His sentence supports the apparent ...

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What are some of the major words that we use in English directly (unmodified) from Latin?
2 votes

Page 403 from Words: A User's Guide, by Graham Pointon and Stewart Clark:

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Information on the Penates
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3 votes

There is a whole book in Latin on the topic: https://books.google.it/books?id=PGhXAAAAcAAJ&printsec=frontcover&hl=it#v=onepage&q&f=false The title is De diis Romanorum patriis sive ...

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What's the latin translation of "proceeding in disregard of"
3 votes

I would use for example omissa scientia... as an ablative absolute, meaning "when/if/since the science (of ...) is neglected or ignored"... And you can specify what is such scientia, or ...

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How do you latinize the name "Cole"?
2 votes

I agree with @Vincenzo that Cola would probably work well, not only because in Latin there exists the word agricola, meaning "farmer", but especially since Agricola was a real name. Gnaeus Iulius ...

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How to say "living a purposeful life" in Latin?
0 votes

Industriosam vitam vivere. I would suggest this translation, since industriosus well represents the purpose and the action, deliberate and industrious. This adjective is from the late Latin, but ...

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Is 'volo' ever used with a future infinitive?
3 votes

Has anybody come across a wish with a future infinitive or something comparable? It is certainly not easy to come across an example of a future infinitive with the verb volo, since there are other ...

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Difference MCM and MDCCCC
2 votes

Here is a picture from The Inland Paper (volume 24) [that you can find here]. Since the paper was to be published in 1900, the editors were asked to provide their opinion on the writing of the number ...

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Maxima - a speech competition?
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4 votes

The word maxima [sententia] indicates a sentence that is a general truth or is generally assumed to be true. Not necessarily it explains a complex context, you can instead think of a maxima as an ...

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Dative of Reference
3 votes

Miltomino has already analyzed in detail the other cases you proposed, so I'll only linger over this interesting example: On the same page the serendipitous discovery of an interesting piece of ...

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How does one express adjectives in the present tense in Latin which aren't everlasting?
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2 votes

Exempli gratia, how would one say 'I am perturbed' in Latin opposed to 'I am a human'? I am perturbed = turbor or perturbor, if I am perturbed by someone or something in this moment (generally ...

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How did 'in-' + 'putare' compound to mean 'to attribute, credit to, impute'?
2 votes

What are the semantic meaning and role of the prefix 'in-' in imputare? In- literally means "towards", whilst puto is to reckon, and even calculate, compute. This results in "ascribing someone", "...

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Should one use the singular or plural when the number is unknown?
3 votes

This is a matter of choice of the author, no escape. However, I would suggest to refer to a plural audience, like a true Latin orator, like Cicero, who looked at the crowd of the Senatus with respect ...

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"No virtue in being a humankind" into Latin
0 votes

It is actually quite difficult to find out a proper translation without betraying the Latin and classical spirit! In the Latin world the importance of animals is mainly about what they represent: ...

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Is "mobile (vulgus)" used to refer to a "mob"?
2 votes

Mobile vulgus occurs sometimes in Classical Latin, and among the main authors that use this phrase are: Publius Papinius Statius (1st century AD); Seneca in his Hercules Furens (vv.169-171): "...

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Latin phrase for “at the moment” or “immediate”, temporal equivalent for in situ?
1 votes

There are some synonyms, such as nunc, modo, hic ("now"), or extemplo, for "immediately, instantly" or "at the immediate".

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Why plural "laudantium" with singular "militiae"?
2 votes

It is true that this may be considered an example of constructio ad sensum et non ad litteram. Nevertheless I prefer another perspective: if laudantium and dicentium are substantivized participles ...

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How do you translate 'preferring man' into Latin as 'wise man' is translated into Homo sapiens?
1 votes

I would suggest to use the verb "cernere", meaning "having the ability to distinguish (and operate a choice as a consequence)". Maybe something like Homo cernit (man decides), or Homo crevit (Here I ...

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