fdb
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How does one say "the will to live" in Latin?
17 votes

Schopenhauer himself rendered his concept "Wille zum Leben" as "voluntas vivendi" in a marginal note to Augustine's Civitas dei.

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What does "tom. i." mean?
15 votes

tomus primus = "volume one".

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Is this printing style common in Latin books?
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15 votes

It is called a catchword and is common in manuscripts and in early printed books. Usually it appears only on the verso (even-numbered pages) and it allows the bookbinders to make sure that nothing is ...

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What is a best man in Latin?
14 votes

In the light of témoin, testimone, Trauzeuge, I would expect “testis”, though this might give rise to some ribald humour, as already in Plautus (quod amas, amato testibus praesentibus).

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Are concubine and concupiscence ultimately related?
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13 votes

Both words have the same prefix (con-), but the rest is different. cupere means “to desire”, cubare means “to lie down”. “p” is not “b”. “desire” is not “lying down”.

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Does liberi only refer to free children?
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13 votes

It is generally accepted that liberi “children” is the same word as liber “free, not slave”. So, etymologically liberi are “free-born offspring of either sex”. But it is an error to assume that the ...

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When did the word "ly" enter the Latin language and where did it come from?
13 votes

As you say, “ly” is an early form of the Romance article; you can compare the Old French article for nom. sing. masc. "li". Aquinas uses it in his commentary on the Gospel of John 1,1 explicitly as ...

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How to read αἱμύλιος or when to aspirate
12 votes

If a word begins with a diphthong, the breathing sign is written over the second vowel letter. "Haimylioi" is correct.

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'idem hercle esset' meaning?
Accepted answer
12 votes

"By Hercules!" "Indeed!" - Common in classical and post-classical Latin. http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0059%3Aentry%3DHercules

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Does 'noel' really have its origin in Latin?
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12 votes

From the etymology of Noel (Ortolang): Étymol. et Hist. A. Subst. masc. 1. début xiies. «fête de la nativité de Jésus-Christ» al Naël Deu (Saint Brendan, 620, éd. E. G. R. Waters); 1119 Noel (...

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Did "benedicere" ever mean "to blaspheme"?
11 votes

Benedixit is a perfectly literal translation of ηὐλόγησεν and of בֵּרַכְתָּ with the difference only that the Latin and the Greek use 3rd sing. where the Hebrew uses 2nd sing. in oratio obliqua. ...

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On the literal meaning of "in saecula saeculorum"
11 votes

It is a Semitic idiom, as in “king of kings” or “vanities of vanities”. “X-singular of X-plural” means “X to the highest possible degree”. This particular expression (“eternity of eternities”), is ...

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Is Nietzsche's proposed etymology of "bonus" (good) correct?
11 votes

This etymology is not accepted by modern scholars, though the ultimate origin of "bonus" is contested. I cannot get de Vaan to scan properly, but here is Walde: bonus „gut“, altlat. duonus, noch ...

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The Latin word “Have” rather than “Ave” as a translation of the Greek word Χαῖρε?
11 votes

There is a longstanding view that the interjection ave is not the imperative of the verb aveo “to long for”, but is a loan from Punic ḥawe (tentative vocalisation), the imperative of the Semitic verb ...

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Does Latin have anything like this German syntax? (dative of possession)
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11 votes

First of all, let me say that this construction is not exactly standard German, even at the time when the Brothers Grimm wrote down this story. It is more what one calls “dialektgefärbtes Hochdeutsch”....

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Classical Latin translations from extant Greek sources (or vice versa)
11 votes

Catullus 51 (Ille mi par esse deo videtur…) is a fairly literal translation of a very famous poem by Sappho (φαίνεταί μοι κῆνος ἴσος θέοισιν).

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Does any Latin noun originally end in -r?
Accepted answer
10 votes

Pater, mater, frater etc. are IE -r stems; compare pater with English father, Sanskrit (acc. s.) pitaram etc. Iecur is an IE -r/n heteroclit, like Avestan yakarə.

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Why is there no definite article in the phrase Ἐν ἀρχῇ ἦν ὁ λόγος?
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10 votes

The use and non-use of the definite article in the language of the Greek Bible is irregular and often unexpected. At least partially this is due to the fact that the authors of most of these writings ...

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What is a Latin version of Inshallah?
10 votes

C.M. Weimer has given an expectedly excellent answer to the Latin part of this question. Otherwise, it might be permitted to add that the Muslim usage is in response to an explicit Qur’anic injunction ...

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Origins of the word "hodie"
10 votes

As is often the case with things that seem obvious, the explanation of hodiē as a contraction of hōc + diē is actually problematic and hotly contested. One theory is that it is from the bare stem *ho-....

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What is the meaning of "REM ORUINE PANDO"
10 votes

Presumably (as far as one can presume anything without an image of the object in question) it says “rem ordine pando”, a quotation from Vergil’s Aeneid 3:179.

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Why "idolatria" instead of "idololatria"?
Accepted answer
10 votes

The uncontracted "idololatria" is used by Tertullian, and by Jerome in his commentary on Isaiah (if we can trust the copyists and editors). http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%...

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Latin for "Stand upon the heavens" and "Surpass the gods"
9 votes

"Superare divos" is a literal quotation from the Roman poet Catullus, Ille mi par esse deo videtur, ille, si fas est, superare divos, qui sedens adversus identidem te spectat et audit "...

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Where does this plural come from?
Accepted answer
9 votes

It is accusative plural, agreeing with res. "We have donated to the monastery which is called H. certain things (that were part) of our property".

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In Ancient Greek, why ἑπτά vs. ἕβδομος?
Accepted answer
9 votes

The Greek word for seven, hepta, like Sanskrit sapta, Latin septem, and others, points to an Indo-European *septm. In Greek *s becomes h, and the syllabic *m becomes a. In the word for “seventh”, IE *...

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What is the meaning of the abbreviations “h.e.” and “h.l.”?
Accepted answer
9 votes

h.e. = hoc est ad h.l. = ad hunc locum

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"Litus Saxonicum", or "Litus Saxonicus"
8 votes

lītus, gen. lītŏris “shore” is definitely neuter. Litus saxonicus is thus wrong (unless you mean lĭtus, gen. -ūs “smearing”, which is masculine).

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Is μῆνις cognate with mania?
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8 votes

μανία is from the Indo-European root *men- “to think of”, zero-grade *mn- with suffix -y-. It has been suggested that μῆνις is from the same root, but this does not explain the long vowel (Ionic ē, ...

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How to decline a whale?
8 votes

The attested nom. sing. is either the Latinised cetus m., or the borrowed cetos n. In the plural only the borrowed cete n., nom./acc. is attested, but by analogy one would expect gen. *ceton and dat. *...

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Do Crashing Vowels Disqualify Words?
8 votes

I need to contradict the notion of "elision requirement" postulated in one of the comments on the previous question. In written Latin there is no elision. You write quite simply "contra audacem", "mea ...

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