Unbrutal_Russian
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1 answers
9 votes
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Why did Cicero use The Royal "We"?
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14 votes

This isn't the royal "we", but is closest to what today is called plūrālis modestiae is Latin, the author's "we" in English. As Joonas mentions in the comments, this is an ...

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2 answers
8 votes
3k views
How do you say "good morning" in Latin?
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11 votes

I myself have wondered about this on numerous occasions, and here's what I've learned: There were no separate greetings for different times of day in ancient Rome, unlike in modern European languages. ...

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3 answers
8 votes
872 views
Why is Thesaurus Musicarum Latinarum in the feminine?
7 votes

Thesaurus Musicorum Latinorum could be understood to mean "A treasury of Latin musicians", where the noun is not the feminine mūsica ('music') but the masculine mūsicus ('musician'). I ...

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3 answers
7 votes
423 views
Confused about the use of "quae" as an interrogative word
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Quis is used both as the gender-neutral animate question word (i.e. when used on its own: quis est? "who is that person?"), and as the masculine determiner (i.e. modifying a masculine noun: ...

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6 answers
9 votes
6k views
How to say "everything will be good" in Latin?
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I do not find futūrum est modified by a manner adjunct, probably not least because futūrum is also a noun "the future", and such a usage would be an infelicitous mixture of the form's two grammatical ...

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2 answers
8 votes
108 views
How do I save money in Latin?
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6 votes

Here's a list I've come up with mainly using Latinitium's Smith & Hall and L&S, some Loebs as well as a Ru<>La dictionary: reservāre 'to save up by keeping', probably in reference to ...

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3 answers
16 votes
2k views
What is the largest online Latin speaking community?
6 votes

In addition to the Zoom chat (which may not be everyone's cup of tea), there are quite a few active communities that are more permanent. Discord is notable for allowing real-time voice communication, ...

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2 answers
7 votes
491 views
"Explaining oneself" in Classical Latin
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6 votes

"To explain oneself", as an official-sounding idiomatic expression for providing plausible reasons or explanation for one's statements or behaviour, can be expressed with (examples mine unless noted, ...

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6 votes
167 views
Checking translation of "ubi vitam amavisti, illuc reverteris"
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The translation is fine, but a few points: at first I thought eō would be more fitting as a relative reference to ubi than illūc, but judging by PHI both are equally fine, with the latter having more ...

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2 answers
8 votes
334 views
Hearing vs hearing that
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5 votes

Well, actually™ it's not true that perception verbs are normally used with the Present Participle. This is the natural home of the Accusative with Infinitive (AcI), while Present Participle (AcPP) is ...

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4 answers
9 votes
944 views
"Wishful thinking" in Latin
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I would reply to this with utinam, and if it was necessary to concisely refer back to it as a communicative event, I would substantivise it: dē istō utinam tuō. Apart from that, somnium is fitting as ...

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6 answers
14 votes
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How did the Romans wish good birthday?
5 votes

Here's the only classical-age birthday wish I've been able to find on PHI: C. Plinius Traijānō imperātōrī Optō, domine, et hunc nātālem et plūrimōs aliōs quam fēlīcissimōs agās... ('I wish, Sir, ...

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3 answers
5 votes
529 views
Is "necesse" an adjective or an adverb
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I don't think it's productive to attempt to determine the part of speech of this word - it's neither, since it modifies neither a noun nor a verb. necesse/necessum est, opus est, ūsus est and oportet ...

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2 answers
4 votes
170 views
Dealing with 2 genitives "The farmer's daughter loves the waters of the forest"
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4 votes

It's not true that the order of words could be anything any more than it's true that "Time flies like an arrow" could be understood in all the 11 different interpretations that one can read ...

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2 answers
5 votes
109 views
The idea of In versus On in Latin
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in petasō can't mean "on", only "inside". The "on" in the dictionaries is an artifact of the English usage where the distinction between various prepositions is often ...

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4 answers
5 votes
571 views
"gerund + genitive" vs "gerund+accusative" ("scribendo epistulas" vs "scribendo epistularum")
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No, this construction is impossible because it has nominal syntax (hoc domūs tēctum "this house roof") like the English gerund, while the Latin gerund has verbal syntax (not *in hōc ...

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4 answers
28 votes
6k views
ATM in Vatican City: "Inserito scidulam quaeso ut faciundam cognoscas rationem"
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4 votes

When I first saw this text it too struck me as unclear and unnatural. The first problem has since been resolved, the second however remains. Another reply mentions Foster himself translating it as '...

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1 answers
7 votes
179 views
Italiānus "native or inhabitant of Italy" - Latin or Macaronicanese?
4 votes

Previous installment: Substantive adjectives "Latīna, Graeca" as language names Related Qs: Deriving adjectives from city names, Someone of someplace I'll start by answering the questions: ...

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2 answers
2 votes
484 views
Unlike "videtur mihi", can "mihi placet" stand alone?
3 votes

When I said that mihi placet can't be used like that, I didn't mean to say it can't stand alone - it absolutely can when the context is sufficient to identify the thing that evokes the emotion. Even ...

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2 answers
3 votes
123 views
Can the word "vulnus" mean vulnerability?
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No, it cannot refer either to anything good (save for "wounds of love"), nor to a quality, being a straight and simple equivalent of English "wound, blow".

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1 answers
3 votes
101 views
Coming from physically or originate from a place? (Ab Gallia venio)
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In Classical Latin: ā Galliā veniō means "I'm coming away/going away from Gaul" or "From Gaul I'm coming to.." dē Galliā veniō means "I'm arriving from Gaul" or "After/From Gaul I'm coming to.." you ...

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1 answers
9 votes
262 views
Substantive adjectives "Latīna, Graeca" as language names
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3 votes

No dictionary I've checked lists such a usage. The closest to what I'm looking for is DMLBS listing a meaning "2.b (w. ellipsis of lingua)", but the two examples it gives display ordinary (in effect ...

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1 answers
2 votes
140 views
Cum = When (Imperfect Subjunctive)
3 votes

Because there can be only one predicate per clause and that is the verb profitēbantur, while aggressī is a participle, describing senēs and standing in for the clause "postquam aggressī sunt"...

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1 answers
4 votes
243 views
Why do I find it hard not to palatalize the /g/ in digitus?
2 votes

Your intution is correct and insightful, OP, despite what you say about your limited knowledge of phonetics. Assimilation within /ki/ and /gi/ is physiologically unavoidable because the vowels are ...

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7 votes
164 views
Syllabification of "anhelo"
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2 votes

Important distinction: syllabification pertains to actual pronunciation and is not what you mean here, which is hyphenation, how the word is broken up in writing at the end of a line. Syllabification ...

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2 answers
2 votes
75 views
How does one say "Beyond the curtain (for a theatre)", in Latin?
2 votes

poscaenium ~ poscēnium is the name for the place behind the wall of the stage, and is probably what you're looking for, e.g. in poscēniō. It's derived from the phrase post scaenam ~ scēnam "...

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2 answers
4 votes
130 views
Difference between Sententia and Opinio?
2 votes

sententia is something you've given thought to and which relates to a given situation, a view; from this follow its uses as "thought expressed in words", "sense, sentence", "...

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3 answers
8 votes
619 views
Latin translation for 'folk music'
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The problem with carmina is that it specifically refers to sung verse - first Saturnian verse and then hexameters - with connotations of ritual and mystery about it. It can also refer to popular verse ...

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2 answers
5 votes
278 views
How often is "et" used as an adverb, and what might distinguish that usage?
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2 votes

To check a word's part of speech, you need to see which syntactic equivalent you can replace it with, whose part of speech you already know. Picking synoymous expressions is the easiest way: the ...

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2 answers
3 votes
228 views
Does anyone know what the New Latin adaption of iens (family to eo) was?
1 votes

Assuming I've managed to grasp the gist of the question correctly: I~i and J~j, U~u and V~v have been, and to some extent continue to be variant forms of the same Latin letter, like there are many ...

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