rjpond
  • Member for 4 years, 3 months
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  • York, United Kingdom
1 answers
8 votes
437 views
Can infans refer to children who can speak?
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11 votes

In the Oxford Latin Dictionary (which only covers Classical Latin): An infant, little child (strictly, one not yet able to talk). The use of "strictly" in the parenthesis implies that even ...

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2 answers
10 votes
803 views
What is the diminutive form of "Insula"?
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Cassell's Latin Dictionary translates the English word "islet" to Latin as parva insula. The Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources (DMLBS) contains the word insuleta / insuletta, ...

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1 answers
5 votes
209 views
What did the Romans misunderstand about Latin?
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8 votes

These are some areas where Roman grammarians' views of Latin differed from ours (it doesn't necessarily mean that they were wrong and we're right). Under my first heading, I describe an area of ...

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12 votes
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Etymology and pronunciation of words ending in “-iasis”
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Pronunciation Below you can see the vowel lengths marked by L&S and by OLD. Note that OLD doesn't cover post-Classical vocabulary. (In this table L&S = the online L&S via Perseus; OLD = ...

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1 answers
10 votes
738 views
How would Marcus Aurelius have pronounced his Latin?
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For the most part, the upper classes in Rome still spoke Classical Latin in the 2nd century AD. Features in common with Classical Latin c - hard, as /k/. The softening came much later. g - hard, as /...

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3 answers
4 votes
447 views
abortio < ab- (away from) + orto (rising)?
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The original sense of aborior was probably "die", with "be miscarried/aborted" and "miscarry/abort" as derived sense. Orior originally meant "rise" but took on ...

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2 answers
20 votes
1k views
What is the logic behind the order of the cases
5 votes

Overview | ---------------|------------------|--------------------------| | Case ordering | Origin | Popular in | | ---------------|------------------|-------------------------...

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1 answers
7 votes
936 views
Difference between dexter/sinister and rectus/laevus?
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Dexter and rectus "Dexter" is the term for "right" as in one's right hand. "Rectus" never means "right" in this sense; it means straight, upright, direct, or ...

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6 votes
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How was Latin taught in Western Europe in the 17th century?
4 votes

Pronunciation of Latin in 17th century Europe Although Erasmus a century earlier made an early attempt at reconstructing Classical pronunciation, it didn't catch on. Different national pronunciations ...

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4 answers
4 votes
872 views
Is there a Latin verb for enabling?
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2 votes

Cassell's Latin Dictionary has: enable = dat. of person + gen. of thing + facultatem facere facilitate = acc. of thing + faciliorem reddere The Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources (...

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2 answers
6 votes
119 views
The use of et...et and the following grammar
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Iam et Marcus et Quintus mala habent. A comment by TKR pointed out that in addition to the question of whether "malum" should be used as a distributive singular, there's also the question ...

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1 answers
8 votes
398 views
Size of Latin vocabulary by period
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| ------------------------------------------------------------------------- | | Dictionary | Reported number of headwords or entries | Period covered | | -------------------------------------------...

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