dbmag9
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What does the "Lorem Ipsum" mean?
11 votes

The text is not a coherent passage of Latin but rather is derived from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC. This ...

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What's the cool killer app of Latin?
8 votes

I get the sense you are most interested in unusual linguistic features of Latin, which I'm not qualified to talk about. It's also worth noting that 'why study Latin' is a well-addressed question in ...

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Translating “Claim Joy” as a Personal Motto
7 votes

My mind immediately went to carpe 'seize, claim, enjoy, pluck' for the verb: as well as connotations of plucking something off a tree, which seems in line with what you want, it also echoes the well-...

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Practice passages for Latin SAT?
6 votes

The level and question style won't match perfectly, but you could still benefit from using English/Welsh GCSE/AS/A-Level past papers: GCSE for example available here. The GCSE grade system switched in ...

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Is it possible to have an imperative feel without using the imperative form of a verb?
5 votes

I don't know if it could be applied to the sentence you're looking to translate, but to answer the more general question in the title ('Is it possible to have an imperative feel without using the ...

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What is the name of the thing that the tongue does on the trī part in the word patrī?
4 votes

As MPW said in their comment, this is a trill, a common feature of many languages. I'm no linguist, but I would classify the one in your recording as an alveolar trill, similar to that in modern ...

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A short form for «as (it-) is»?
Accepted answer
4 votes

As you have found for yourself, a very suitable choice would be stet. This is a subjunctive 'let it stand' or 'it should stand'. In the comments it was clarified that the intended use here is code ...

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Passive form of "One can not know"
4 votes

My first thought would be that the intention is for you to render it as 'it cannot be known', so something like notum esse non potest or perhaps nosci non potest. It sounds more natural with more ...

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How do you say "Forum Friends" in Latin?
4 votes

'X friends', in English, I think can reasonably be reinterpreted as 'friends from X', and this suggests the Latin amici de foro, amici a foro or amici e foro. I'll leave it to someone with a little ...

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Is there any connection between "ave" (as in Ave Cesar) and "aveo"?
Accepted answer
4 votes

Ave meaning 'hail' is the imperative of aveo, as you mention; when you hail someone you are instructing them to fare well (normally we would say you are wishing them to fare well), in much the same ...

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Are Latin feminine academic titles used in formal occasions?
3 votes

At Oxford, Latin is still the official language of Congregation, such that for proceedings in English permission is asked first*. The annual ceremony where honorary degrees are conferred is called ...

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How to say "Graduation" in Latin?
3 votes

Two ideas from the University of Oxford, which still conducts some of its ceremonies (including degree days) in Latin: Encaenia is a Greek word for a festival of renewal, which is the name of Oxford'...

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Sarcastic alternative to Alea iacta est
2 votes

It doesn't follow your 'one-sided die' idea, but one possibility is alea abiecta est for 'the die is [has been] cast away' (or discarded). It follows the phrasing of the original tightly but ...

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Translating “scholar in residence”
2 votes

Oxford uses socius for 'fellow' (as in an academic member of a college), which more generally means something like 'partner' or 'member' (of an institution). This suggests something like socius ...

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Struggling to translate baptism record
1 votes

I believe the words you have underlined are a name: I'm fairly confident the first is Samuelis and to me the second looks like Stringer although I'm less certain about that. I think the word you have ...

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