13

Gender assignment in Latin is an issue too complex to cover in one post. I follow Greville Corbett (e.g. Corbett 1991) in maintaining the difference between common nouns (grammatical gender varies between feminine or masculine, depending on the biological sex of the referent) and epicene nouns (grammatical gender is fixed and cannot be overwritten by the ...


11

I found an article that gives some excellent examples of this usage as well as practical tips for how to recognize it: Thomas Nelson, "The Third Qui, and Six Ways to Recognize It, or 'Who Happens, Maecenas?'" Nelson begins by noting that there are three kinds of qui. The first two are ubiquitous, and found in the L&S entry for the first meaning of qui: ...


9

A relatively common construction in Latin is to use the verb curare. If "I do this" is hoc facio, then "I have someone do this" is "hoc faciendum curo". To my knowledge this construction is impersonal in the sense that you cannot indicate who you make do the job. There is a way to indicate who has to do something, and it is called the passive periphrastic ...


8

In the Plautus passage, it has to be a man because of not only hic, but also ebrius. L&S's entry for homo lists several examples: Of females: mater, cujus ea stultitia est, ut eam nemo hominem appellare possit,” Cic. Clu. 70, 199: “quae (Io) bos ex homine est,” Ov. F. 5, 620; Juv. 6, 284: “dulcissimum ab hominis camelinum lac,” Plin. 28, 9, 33, § 123:...


7

Alibi has a pretty straightforward translation, which you mention: "elsewhere," though there are cases, mentioned in the linked entry, where it can have other meanings. The two cases you cite all use this primary meaning: In a footnote, alibi at the end is a Latinate (and, by my reckoning, no longer used) way of indicating that a certain item can also be ...


7

Firmamentum first shows up in the Vulgate to translate the Hebrew רָקִיעַ raqiyaʻ "firmament" (Strong's Hebrew #7549), which means expanse or support, but also the mythological arch of the heavens, separating "the waters above and the waters below" (Gn 1:7). It's a concept that finds parallel in other Ancient Near East mythologies (Wikipedia, for instance, ...


7

DRN 2.393: aut quia ni mirum maioribus est elementis / aut magis hamatis inter se perque plicatis. This one is somewhat dubious. It could be analysed as an adverb. I think the problem is that prepositions and adverbs are not entirely separate in Latin/Greek, and I think in in your example could be analysed as an adverb as well, if we should ignore ...


6

Unus multorum means "one of many". I gather that the phrase is comparable to "average Joe" in English, or "just one of the crowd"—the opposite of the uniqueness conveyed by sui generis. My Latin is not that solid; hopefully someone more knowledgeable will correct or confirm this. This 1814 dictionary reports: unus multorum et de multis, is said of one, ...


6

In addition to the excellent answers, I'll add the construction facere ut + subjunctive. We see it all over in Plautus, e.g. Bacchides: Propterea hoc facio, ut suadeas gnato meo ut pergraecetur tecum, tervenefice. All over in Cicero, e.g. Pro Cælio: Quæ tu omnia tuis foedis factis facis ut nequiquam velim: vix ferendi. And so on. The construction ...


6

In medieval Latin, habere came to express (also) ability or obligation. I'd have to dig up an example, but I see it in Ockham with some (minor) frequency. However, it is also mentioned in Elliott's 'Brief Introduction to Medieval Latin Grammar' in Medieval Latin, ed. Harrington, rev. Pucci (Chicago, 1997), § 7.2.2, citing (e.g.) Tertullian, Apologeticum 37: ...


6

The absolute meaning of βλέπω is "to see", "have the power of sight" (opposed to τυφλός εἰμι, cfr. LSJ ad l.): S. OT 302-303: πόλιν μέν, εἰ καὶ μὴ βλέπεις, φρονεῖς δ' ὅμως / οἵᾳ νόσῳ σύνεστιν; S. OC 73: τίς πρὸς ἀνδρὸς μὴ βλέποντος ἄρκεσις; Ar. Pl. 15: οἱ γὰρ βλέποντες τοῖς τυφλοῖς ἡγούμεθα; In a broad sense, βλέπω could also mean "...


6

Γλαυκῶπις, -ιδος (L. glaucōpis, -idis) This has already been mentioned in the Mythology question you linked, but I think it's the best idiom for your usage. This is a Greek word, but one famous enough that educated Romans would recognize it (especially as glaucus is attested in Latin). It's a compound; the second part is pretty clearly ὤψ/ōps, "eye"...


6

To add to what Alex B. has already said about tesserae, there's a passage near the end of Seneca's Apocolocyntosis (14.4) that uses alea specifically to denote the game, whereas tesserae denotes the objects that you use to play it: tum Aeacus iubet illum alea ludere pertuso fritillo. et iam coeperat fugientes semper tesseras quaerere et nihil proficere: ...


6

I happen to have seen one in Marracci's Refutatio Alcorani (1698), Prodromus, Vita Mahumeti, Caput 24 (https://books.google.nl/books?id=HwY_AAAAcAAJ&pg=PA29): ... ne fortè ... per technas Imperium à se τῷ Aly destinatum præriperent. Literally: "... lest perhaps ... they would by artifices snatch away the Empire destined by him for Ali." Elsewhere ...


6

You are right, this is terrible Latin. They could have said: "we now have a populus of 215,000 ongoing students". If it really has to be Latin, that is.


6

First, as noted in the comments, some people like to use the letter J when writing Latin, others don't (and just write I instead). There's a distinction, as seen in pairs like Julius vs Iulus, but the Romans didn't distinguish them in writing and it seldom creates actual ambiguity. So there's no difference in meaning between the two. Literally, that meaning ...


6

As a general first note, praestandi looks much more like a gerund than a gerundive here. A gerundive would be passive in nature. A gerund is active; it is best understood as a case inflection of the infinitive. If praestare is "to excel", then praestandi is roughly "of excelling". For example, ars magna scribendi is "the art of ...


5

Yes, it does happen. The esse and the perfect participle need not be anywhere near each other. For example, Cicero (in Verrem 2.1.16) writes: In Siciliam sum inquirendi causa profectus. The verb proficisci is deponent, but it doesn't invalidate the point. The same freedom is found with other verbs as well (Pro Caecina 84.1): …sum ex eo loco ...


5

Brill's New Pauly mentions tesserae (as well as talus) - see http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/morph?l=tesserae&la=la#lexicon "a die for playing, numbered on all the six sides" Examples: Suetonius quotes a letter written by Augustus that says "Inter cenam lusimus geronticos et heri et hodie; talis enim iactatis, ut quisque canem aut ...


5

There's a wide choice of verbs for your purpose, but sequor isn't one of them : it has more a sense of 'pursue', so you might more properly use it for 'pursue an argument' — or a theory, for example — yourself, rather than for following another's line of reasoning. The sense that you are looking for is synonymous with 'understand' or 'grasp', for which ...


5

Genus hominum is the race of (all) mankind. Homo is a common noun, but its meaning is restricted in the same kind of way as 'woman' in English : that is to say, in the way that all ladies are women, but not all women are ladies (!), all mulieres are homines, but not all homines are mulieres. Everything else follows, and I'm sure that your instinct is correct;...


5

To answer your second question (since brianpck has already given an excellent answer to the first), quī is etymologically an ablative. The paradigm of the interrogatives quī, quis is a bit odd in that it combines third-declension forms (quis, quem) and first-/second-declension ones (quā, quō). This quī is originally a third-declension ablative form ("by ...


4

There are several unrelated grammatical points here, which I'll take in the order in which they occur in your Greek sentence. Position of αὐτούς. The pronoun αὐτ- in its non-emphatic third-person use (as opposed to its emphatic use meaning "himself" etc.) acts basically as a postpositive: it does not stand first in a sentence, nor in a smaller prosodic unit....


4

First of all, nothing provides a better brief on the semantics of these conjunctions than a good dictionary. L&S has quite exhaustive (if not exhausting) articles on et and ac/atque. You can supplement it with others at hand, for example, the Oxford Latin Dictionary, which is not available online. In the present narrow context, both conjunctions mean ...


3

Don't read too much into Wiktionary. Lewis and Short translate paucus as "few, little", and the Wiktionary entry was probably pulled from there. All examples in L&S seem to pertain to quantity, and I would assume L&S to mention if it could be used for size as well. I cannot definitively prove a negative, but paucus doesn't seem to be able to mean "...


3

The easy part of your question is the part about Latin. “si” is simply a literal translation of εἰ. The difficult part is why the Greek original uses εἰ (“if”) when it clearly intends “that”. There are situations where classical Greek uses εἰ is this way. Liddell and Scott write: after Verbs denoting wonder, delight, indignation, disappointment, ...


3

Although it could be read as whether, translations are almost1 consistent in translating these particular instances of si as that. There are a couple of meanings of si that are equivalent to quod (that) according to L&S. The one I find more applicable here is I.B.2: In particular, in substantive clauses, to denote a doubtful assumption or future event (...


3

I'm unsure to what extent this was used, but one can find the following causative construction, facere + inf., in Book II of the Aeneid: Quī nātī cōram mē cernere lētum / fēcistī [...] You, who made me watch the death of my son Aeneid, II.538-539 I would perhaps be cautious about using this outside the realm of poetry; Lewis & Short, also ...


3

Nunc almost always modifies a verb. I haven't found any instances yet where nunc modifies a noun to mean "now being...". For that meaning, you could use a relative clause or put in an esse for nunc to modify. From Cicero's Epistulae ad Familiārēs 10.31.6: ...constitui, ut nunc est, cum exercitu proficisci. (Trans.) ...I have decided, with the ...


3

Your question is very interesting because it allows to understand a concept quite important for Romans. First of all I think that your question comes from the quite confusing lemma of the L&S ; for tis kind of research I would recommend the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae or, if the word is not in it yet, the Forcellini's Lexicon Totius Latinitatis. So my ...


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