16 votes

Does the Latin word for "garden" (hortus) also mean "vagina"?

This information is a bit difficult to find in the classic dictionaries, because they tend to be quite squeamish about explaining sexual things! But here's what Lewis and Short have to say about it. ...
Draconis's user avatar
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14 votes
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When can "qui" mean "how"?

I found an article that gives some excellent examples of this usage as well as practical tips for how to recognize it: Thomas Nelson, "The Third Qui, and Six Ways to Recognize It, or 'Who Happens, ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 40.2k
14 votes

Does the Latin word for "garden" (hortus) also mean "vagina"?

Yes, it has been used in this way, and no, Kohut is not making it up. Lewis and Short mention the relevant passages: C. Like the Gr. κῆπος, i. q. pudendum muliebre, Poët. ap. Anth. Lat. I. p. 686 ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 53.9k
13 votes

Examples of "homo" used for a woman

Gender assignment in Latin is an issue too complex to cover in one post. I follow Greville Corbett (e.g. Corbett 1991) in maintaining the difference between common nouns (grammatical gender varies ...
Alex B.'s user avatar
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12 votes
Accepted

Why is the comparative of "sacer" not attested?

Phonologically, there is no obvious reason for *sacrior to not exist: there are a number of attested comparatives with similar forms such as macrior, pulc(h)rior, ācrior, alacrior or integrior, ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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11 votes
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Why does Müller read "accusatius" in Satyrica 119.11?

When you see "daggers" (properly obeli) in a critical text, it means the word is (or words are) corrupt. If the editor cannot make sense of the meaning, they are obelized, which is ...
cmw's user avatar
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9 votes
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Causatives in Latin

A relatively common construction in Latin is to use the verb curare. If "I do this" is hoc facio, then "I have someone do this" is "hoc faciendum curo". To my knowledge this construction is impersonal ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
9 votes

Why is the comparative of "sacer" not attested?

Sacer isn't an especially frequent adjective (seven attestations of the superlative isn't that many); "more sacrificial" isn't a phrase that's needed very often, and it was in competition ...
Draconis's user avatar
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8 votes
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What is the opposite of 'sui generis'?

Unus multorum means "one of many". I gather that the phrase is comparable to "average Joe" in English, or "just one of the crowd"—the opposite of the uniqueness conveyed by sui generis. My Latin is ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
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8 votes
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Examples of "homo" used for a woman

In the Plautus passage, it has to be a man because of not only hic, but also ebrius. L&S's entry for homo lists several examples: Of females: mater, cujus ea stultitia est, ut eam nemo hominem ...
cmw's user avatar
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7 votes
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Was the term "firmamentum" used outside of Christian or Jewish texts?

Firmamentum first shows up in the Vulgate to translate the Hebrew רָקִיעַ raqiyaʻ "firmament" (Strong's Hebrew #7549), which means expanse or support, but also the mythological arch of the heavens, ...
Wtrmute's user avatar
  • 1,216
7 votes

Use of Greek article in Latin to clarify use of foreign indeclinable nouns

I happen to have seen one in Marracci's Refutatio Alcorani (1698), Prodromus, Vita Mahumeti, Caput 24 (https://books.google.nl/books?id=HwY_AAAAcAAJ&pg=PA29): ... ne fortè ... per technas ...
Jasper May's user avatar
  • 1,236
7 votes
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What does "et alibi" mean?

Alibi has a pretty straightforward translation, which you mention: "elsewhere," though there are cases, mentioned in the linked entry, where it can have other meanings. The two cases you cite all ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 40.2k
7 votes
Accepted

Can conjunctions be used to join prepositions with the same object?

DRN 2.393: aut quia ni mirum maioribus est elementis / aut magis hamatis inter se perque plicatis. This one is somewhat dubious. It could be analysed as an adverb. I think the problem is that ...
Cerberus's user avatar
  • 19.8k
7 votes

Causatives in Latin

In addition to the excellent answers, I'll add the construction facere ut + subjunctive. We see it all over in Plautus, e.g. Bacchides: Propterea hoc facio, ut suadeas gnato meo ut pergraecetur ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
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7 votes
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What is the difference between me and mihi?

I want to give a number of small answers, numbered for easy reference if they need discussion: Duolingo has tips that explains some of the grammar. They're worth checking out even if nothing puzzles ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes

Causatives in Latin

In medieval Latin, habere came to express (also) ability or obligation. I'd have to dig up an example, but I see it in Ockham with some (minor) frequency. However, it is also mentioned in Elliott's '...
jon's user avatar
  • 716
6 votes

When to use βλέπω versus ὁράω?

The absolute meaning of βλέπω is "to see", "have the power of sight" (opposed to τυφλός εἰμι, cfr. LSJ ad l.): S. OT 302-303: πόλιν μέν, εἰ καὶ μὴ βλέπεις, φρονεῖς δ' ὅμως / οἵᾳ ...
qwertxyz's user avatar
  • 2,906
6 votes

Is there a Ancient Greek or Latin equivalent to "steely eyed"?

Γλαυκῶπις, -ιδος (L. glaucōpis, -idis) This has already been mentioned in the Mythology question you linked, but I think it's the best idiom for your usage. This is a Greek word, but one famous enough ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66k
6 votes

Can "alea" refer to a physical die, or only the game of dice?

To add to what Alex B. has already said about tesserae, there's a passage near the end of Seneca's Apocolocyntosis (14.4) that uses alea specifically to denote the game, whereas tesserae denotes the ...
cnread's user avatar
  • 19.9k
6 votes

Is "Stanford populi" bad Latin?

You are right, this is terrible Latin. They could have said: "we now have a populus of 215,000 ongoing students". If it really has to be Latin, that is.
fdb's user avatar
  • 17.7k
6 votes

Opposing meanings of the suffix -gena

The variants -gena and -genus This ending has two forms: -gena (inflected as a first-declension masculine/common gender noun, potentially used adjectivally) and -genus, -gena, -genum (inflected like a ...
Asteroides's user avatar
  • 28.5k
6 votes

Do these two phrases mean something different?

First, as noted in the comments, some people like to use the letter J when writing Latin, others don't (and just write I instead). There's a distinction, as seen in pairs like Julius vs Iulus, but the ...
Draconis's user avatar
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6 votes
Accepted

Can valeo be used transitively?

As a general first note, praestandi looks much more like a gerund than a gerundive here. A gerundive would be passive in nature. A gerund is active; it is best understood as a case inflection of the ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

How do you phrase didactic statements in Latin?

A&G 475 Actually mentions the "gnomic perfect" The perfect is sometimes used of a general truth, especially with negatives (Gnomic Perfect). Quī studet contingere mētam multa tulit ...
d_e's user avatar
  • 11k
6 votes
Accepted

When does the letter s after ex- get omitted?

I don't know if there are any clear patterns to the historical use of the spellings ex- vs. exs-. I would expect any word to be able to show either spelling; whether actual attestations exist though ...
Asteroides's user avatar
  • 28.5k
5 votes

Can "alea" refer to a physical die, or only the game of dice?

Brill's New Pauly mentions tesserae (as well as talus) - see http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/morph?l=tesserae&la=la#lexicon "a die for playing, numbered on all the six sides" ...
Alex B.'s user avatar
  • 11.6k
5 votes
Accepted

Can "sequi" be used to indicate that I "follow" an argument?

There's a wide choice of verbs for your purpose, but sequor isn't one of them : it has more a sense of 'pursue', so you might more properly use it for 'pursue an argument' — or a theory, for example — ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
  • 18.1k
5 votes

When to use "ac" instead of "et"?

First of all, nothing provides a better brief on the semantics of these conjunctions than a good dictionary. L&S has quite exhaustive (if not exhausting) articles on et and ac/atque. You can ...
kkm -still wary of SE promises's user avatar
5 votes

Latin usage & perfect passive finite verb forms

Yes, it does happen. The esse and the perfect participle need not be anywhere near each other. For example, Cicero (in Verrem 2.1.16) writes: In Siciliam sum inquirendi causa profectus. The verb ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar

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