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9 votes
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In what way is Odysseus διογενής?

Well, γένος and γόνος can mean much more than "child of." They can also mean "descent," "stock," and "tribe." The "golden race" = χρύσεον γένος is not ...
cmw's user avatar
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8 votes
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Why is "occurring yearly" "anniversarius" and not "annoversarius"?

Latin compounds generally use the connecting vowel -i- placed between the two stems, with that -i- replacing any stem-final vowel. This is sometimes argued to be due to analogy to i-stems, but a more ...
Tristan's user avatar
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6 votes
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What is the -ē form in “Latīnē loquor”?

That is the adverbial ending. To convert a first/second adjective to an adverb, you replace the declension ending with -ē: if a document is hard to understand, it's obscūra (or obscūrus etc), but if I ...
Draconis's user avatar
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5 votes
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How is the (rare) Locative Plural formed?

Allen & Greenough name locative plural endings for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd declensions. They are all identical to the dative/ablative: Athenis at Athens (1st declension) Philippis at Philippi (2nd ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
5 votes

Why vowel lengthening in Greek compounds?

This is neatly explained in Buck's "Comparative grammar": And not all that differently in Sihler's "New comparative grammar":
fdb's user avatar
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3 votes
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Are "ἑκάτερος" and "ἕκαστος" different degrees of the same adjective?

Beekes covers this: ETYM The solution of Wackernagel KZ 29 (1888): 144ff. is probably correct (see also Schwyzer: 6304): viz., that the word is from *ἑκάς τις 'every one for himself (cf. εἴς τις '...
cmw's user avatar
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3 votes

Why vowel lengthening in Greek compounds?

It looks like more than one process could lead to a long vowel in a compound word where the corresponding independent word has a short vowel. Here is an overview of what I have found so far. ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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2 votes

Are there unprefixed location verbs in Latin?

Possible examples: carcero, carcerare. Lewis and Short has an entry defining it as follows: to imprison, incarcerate (post-class.), Salv. Prov. 2, p. 53; Auct. Prog. Aug. 29. Pretty clearly based ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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1 vote

Does a general rule for forming Locative Singular exist?

I was never taught that the locative was formed using another case, but I am aware many grammar books refer to a genitive-locative (or other cases) that is just an artefact used maybe as help to ...
Davide's user avatar
  • 175

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