11

My first thought was exhaurire and indeed in his Epistulae Seneca writes to Lucilius: Librum tuum quem mihi promiseras accepi. [...] exhausi totum. I've received your book you had promised me. [...] I've exhausted it all.


9

Whether you say fenestra magna or magna fenestra is up to you – both is absolutely fine in Latin. If you go with fenestra at all, I recommend using the preposition ad, because there is a precedence from Terence (Heautontimorumenos 3,1,72): quantam fenestram ad nequitiam patefeceris “what a great window to licentiousness you will have opened.” But that is not ...


8

The standard word for historical study was in fact archaeology. While Thucydides' "Archaeology" may be a conventional term, Josephus' Antiquitates in Greek was the Archaiologia (ἀρχαιολογία), and historical works by Cleanthes, Hieronymus the Egypytian inter alia were all titled similarly. That said, palaios is not semantically incorrect, and Appian ...


8

An urbs is a city, an oppidum is a town. It is quite common to use urbs to refer specifically to Rome, and the linked dictionary entry even says that oppidum is used for other cities than Rome. You could say that urbs is a capital and oppidum is a regular city. There are a number of ways to phrase and see it, but the crux is: urbs is bigger (in size or ...


6

magna fenestra is fine, but as noted by @Sebastian Koppehel, historia is written history, rather than the historical events themselves which you probably want to refer to. So I suggest magna ad antiqua fenestra or magna ad antiquitatem fenestra or magna ad vetustatem fenestra.


4

To indicate you have “used up” something, you might use consumere or its lesser known sibling absumere. This even fits when you have not “consumed” (in the English sense) the thing. For example, if in battle you have used up all your missiles, you can say: omnia tela consumpta sunt (Caesar, De Bello Civili 1,46). The idea that you “use up” a book seems ...


3

Since you don't specify an age, I have two answers for you, one for ecclesiastical Latin and one for classical. Ecclesiastical Latin In short: familia and (apparently) familiaris consortio are good in church Latin. Indeed, in ecclesiastical Latin, familia is used commonly (shall I even say perferably?) in this sense. A prominent example is a 1981 document ...


3

It may not be a full sentence but there's an implied subject and verb all the same, and I feel it's something like "a healing force flows". In that case, the subject is not the referent of the possessive pronoun, so you should indeed use a form of is, but probably not the ablative: e manibus eis means "from these hands". That may be ...


3

Cadere works for both meanings just fine (and a range of other metaphorical uses). There is no hard distinction as there is in Finnish. For the full range, see Smith's entry on FALL. However, the reason I asked about the context is that "collapse" (i.e. "fall down") might work as a good synonym in English for certain types of falling. In ...


1

The words are generally suitable. virtus can indeed mean strength of character, body and mind, amor is indeed love, and fortitudo can mean courage. However, you are right that virtus and fortitudo overlap more than the corresponding English words strength and courage do. If you want a word meaning only courage, you could use audacia, but be aware that this ...


1

I would agree with the choice of "curator" to translate "manager." Something as general as "project" could be best translated by "res" ("rei"), if at all. You might even leave "project" untranslated, since "curator" implies there is business or task curandum.


1

Well, μολὼν λαβέ is a participle with an imperative, so literally it's translated as: "Having come, take" μολὼν is the masculine singular nominative aorist active participle, which Latin lacks. λαβέ is a simple imperative. So, if you want to stick closer to the grammar of the Greek, perhaps: ventus, accipe If you want something closer to the ...


1

Some examples from the Vulgate: 2 Kings 3:15 nunc autem adducite mihi psalten cumque caneret psaltes facta est super eum manus Domini et ait But now bring me a minstrel. And it came to pass, when the minstrel played, that the hand of the Lord came upon him. (In modern Welsh, the word "canu" means "to sing", but it is also used to say playing an ...


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