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15 votes

Is Wheelock's Latin comprehensive?

Wheelock's is fairly comprehensive, and usually if it doesn't cover something it's because it's a rarer exception. You should be able to read everything "Classical" (basically 1st century ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 55.3k
7 votes
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No direct object in this sentence, "Nihil igitur mors est, quoniam natura animi habetur mortalis."

A couple of things: The fact that there are already an ablative and a genitive in a sentence doesn't preclude their being other ablatives and genitives in that sentence. Mortalis is an adjective, not ...
cnread's user avatar
  • 20.1k
7 votes
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"Neuter alteri plenam copiam pecuniae tum dabit"

This isn't correct. You've made three mistakes here. First, copiam does not mean "blame." Once you figure out it's real meaning, you'll also then ideally figure out what's wrong with ...
cmw's user avatar
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7 votes
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Can "illa" be used to mean "there?"

According to the Oxford Latin Dictionary, illa can be adverbial and mean 'there,' but only if it has a long a (illā). Since your text marks long vowels, you know it can't be this. With a short a, the ...
cnread's user avatar
  • 20.1k
6 votes
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Hí Cicerónem ipsum sécum iúnxérunt, nam eum semper díléxerant

Your translation seems fine to me except: "these of Cicero" makes no sense and is not found in the Latin -- hi is just "these" (people, men, senators, etc.). you got the tense of ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
6 votes

Sub príncipe dúró temporibusque malís audés esse bonus

Audes is the 2nd person singular of audeo, not audire. It means "to dare", not "to hear." Esse is the complementary infinitive of audes, so you should translate it more strictly ...
cmw's user avatar
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6 votes
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Ipsí nihil per sé sine eó facere potuérunt

Unfortunately, both translations might indeed be a bit pleonastic since both ipsi and per se are translated to very similar sets of words in both English and Spanish. However, per se and ipse have ...
Theophylactus's user avatar
5 votes
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Quisque ipse sé díligit, quod quisque per sé sibi cárus est

Note that there is no subjunctive in the second part, and that quod has a lot of alternative meanings. One relevant meaning of quod that seems to apply here is because: Everyone loves themselves ...
Rafael's user avatar
  • 11.5k
5 votes

Can "illa" be used to mean "there?"

I also vote for illa as referring to the spear for the above mentioned reasons, but also because of the switch in subject from iecit = "he threw", to stetit = "it stood". If the illa were not there, ...
Cassius12's user avatar
  • 278
5 votes

Can "illa" be used to mean "there?"

illa is referring to the spear, but it wouldn't be inappropriate to translate this clause as "There it stood, quivering". Assuming one is trying to evoke the sort of poetic English of e.g. the King ...
A. Foster's user avatar
  • 151
4 votes

Can "illa" be used to mean "there?"

I don't know the answer. I don't know if illa could be construed as 'there,' but I haven't come across that use. Only, it seems simpler to take illa as nominative, identifying hasta(fem.) as the ...
Hugh's user avatar
  • 8,693
4 votes

Wheelock vs Lingua Latina?

Wheelock's Latin focuses mainly on grammar, and it explains it in an ordered manner and explicitly. Although it has translation exercises, they really don't give you the feeling that you are able to ...
Alfie González's user avatar
4 votes

Is Wheelock's Latin comprehensive?

One omission that I've always found fairly glaring is the relative clause of purpose. These are mentioned only in the notes to one reading passage but deserve more formal treatment, given how common ...
cnread's user avatar
  • 20.1k
3 votes
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Némó fíliam acerbam cónsulis ipsíus diú díligere potuit

Your translation is correct. Consulis ipsius means exactly what you translated it to, both in Spanish (del mismísimo cónsul) and English (of the consul himself). As for the meaning of the whole ...
Theophylactus's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Understanding entries in Latin dictionary

These are called the principal parts of the verb. They're the same verb, but in different forms. Basically, one form isn't enough to know how to use a verb properly. Imagine if you didn't know ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.6k
2 votes

Understanding entries in Latin dictionary

This is a common way to present the words. See for instance here. They represent, respectively, the first person present active indicative (amo), the infinitive (amare), the perfect active (amavi) ...
luchonacho's user avatar
  • 12.4k
2 votes

Is Wheelock's Latin comprehensive?

I'm not a fan of Wheelock's "Latin." Much better, I believe, to use Allen & Greenough's New Latin Grammar (https://archive.org/details/allengreenoughsn00alleiala). If you're looking for ...
user11589's user avatar
1 vote

Is Wheelock's Latin comprehensive?

If you follow the grammar in Wheelocks when you write, you will make mistakes, not because of what is missing from the book, but because of the mistakes that LaFleur, the new editor, has added to ...
Bob's user avatar
  • 11

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