New answers tagged

6

Never mind, I checked with the LXX and Hebrew texts. The LXX has μέσον ἐμοῦ καὶ τῆς γῆς which is literally “between me and the earth” but Hebrew has בֵּינִי וּבֵין הָאָרֶץ where the preposition בֵּין (”between”) is repeated. Jerome was being word-for-word literal in his translation of the Hebrew here (especially interesting because there are other places ...


8

It's fairly literal, and there are alternatives, especially for "express," but yes, this is an accurate translation, depending on exactly what you mean by the English. The English places two clauses one after each other with a comma. What does that really mean? It's a bit unclear. Also, what do you mean "to know god" - is this expressing ...


10

I understand the phrase producant aquae reptile animae viventis to mean something like "let the waters bring forth the creeping/crawling thing of living breath." In more idiomatic English, I would say: "Let the waters bring forth creeping life." The meaning of anima (genitive form: animae) varies between "breath," "breath ...


16

Jerome probably prefers to stick to the original Hebrew that uses the singulars both for "reptile"(*) and volatile which are grammatically adjectives but used here as substantives. Interestingly enough, in both cases L&S dictionary explicitly lists examples from the Vulgate of using those as substantive (1, 2) - so it appears to be late Latin ...


Top 50 recent answers are included