Skip to main content
6 votes
Accepted

What does "quod" refer to in Vulgate in Matthew 26:75?

The antecedent of quod is verbi, which here is genitive singular (not plural), same as ῥήματος in the Greek original. In Greek, the object of μιμνήσκω (the original verb in the main sentence here) is ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 55.9k
5 votes
Accepted

How was the name Abraham pronounced in Jerome's Vulgate Latin?

It's plausible that the BR in ABRAHAM was pronounced as [βɾ] in Jerome's Latin. If it was pronounced as [bɾ] instead, it's unlikely that pronunciation represents intentional selection of [bɾ] over [βɾ]...
Asteroides's user avatar
  • 29.5k
5 votes
Accepted

In Vulgate in Ecclesiastes 2:16, why does it say "et futura tempora oblivione *cuncta* pariter operient" (neuter accusative plural) and not "cunctos"?

Cuncta is neuter plural because it refers to “all things” rather than “all people.”
Kingshorsey's user avatar
  • 6,931
4 votes

What version of the Vulgate is this?

While writing this question, I finally found the answer. I shouldn't have been surprised - BlueLetterBible uses the one remaining version of the Vulgate that I hadn't checked - the Stuttgart one. I ...
Nacht's user avatar
  • 505
2 votes
Accepted

Ecclesiastes 9:5 "...quia oblivioni tradita est *memoria eorum*." - "memory containing them" or "memory they posessed in their heads"?

Answer: Something else. The original reads: ”כִּי נִשְׁכַּח זִכְרָם“ (Ecclesiastes 9:5 BHS-T). ("For their memory is forgotten.") "their memory" could either be... Subjective: ...
Epimanes's user avatar
  • 358
2 votes
Accepted

Ranking of the Books of the Nova Vulgata by difficulty

Your question brings me back to the days when I first started studying Latin in earnest. I purchased copies of the vulgate, the Clementina, the Stuttgart edition, and the Nova. I started reading the ...
Figulus's user avatar
  • 4,771
2 votes

Ranking of the Books of the Nova Vulgata by difficulty

I've only read the older Clementine Vulgate and this is my gut ranking (easiest to hardest): Mark, Matthew, John, Luke and Acts, All Epistles (Paul especially hard). I just remember Mark and Matthew ...
blainefreestone's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

In Vulgate in Matthew 26:29, is "bibam" present subjunctive or future indicative?

It is future tense. The second clause is an independent clause. In English, although it is translated just as "drink" it should be construed as action taking place in the future. In other ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 7,077
1 vote
Accepted

In Vulgate in Apocalypsis 20:4, why does it say "et regnaverunt cum Christo mille *annis*" (ablative?), rather than "...annos" (accusative)?

According to the grammars, the accusative answers the question “how long”, and the ablative tells us “when” or “within which time”. But I suspect that by the time of Jerome this distinction was no ...
fdb's user avatar
  • 17.9k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible