Skip to main content

New answers tagged

6 votes

Latin minimal pairs, distinguished only by the length of the vowel in an unstressed non-last syllable

Here are two more examples: From vĕnire and vēnire we get vĕnīmus and vēnīmus. From occĭdere and occīdere we get occĭdentes and occīdentes.
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
1 vote

Latin minimal pairs, distinguished only by the length of the vowel in an unstressed non-last syllable

It barely matters if it's stressed. Sometimes the stressed vowel is short. I really recommend this channel: https://www.youtube.com/@ScorpioMartianus These are quite common homographs: āeris: "of ...
Stofi's user avatar
  • 21
17 votes
Accepted

Latin minimal pairs, distinguished only by the length of the vowel in an unstressed non-last syllable

The verb nĭteō "shine" is only used in the active, and the verb nītor "strive" only in the passive (it's deponent), so at first glance it seems like there won't be confusion ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.6k

Top 50 recent answers are included