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10 votes
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Who asked whom about the cape of parchment? And who answered?

TKR has it exactly right: Cumque magister Sella, sic enim magister vocabatur, a discipulo quereret, quid cappa illa et littere sibi vellent, respondit.... Translation: And when Master Sella (...
brianpck's user avatar
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7 votes
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What sort of Greek words are regularly distinguished only by tone?

In general, compounds in -ος of nouns or adverbs with transitive verb stems, with certain exceptions, do this. (Exceptions include nouns ending in ‐κος or ‐τος and certain verb stems such as ‐οχος, ‐...
varro's user avatar
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7 votes

Passive Subjunctive Translated as Active

The verb in question (minor, -ari, -atus) is a deponent verb, which means that it has a passive form but an active meaning. There are many such verbs in Latin. Consider the following cases: Multa ...
brianpck's user avatar
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4 votes

Do non-deponent Latin verbs ever have a "middle voice"?

Thinking about your very interesting question ("That is, do we ever see non-deponent verbs with passive morphology, but able to take accusative direct objects and not able to take ablative agents?"), ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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4 votes

Do non-deponent Latin verbs ever have a "middle voice"?

The way I see it, there is no middle voice in Latin, but there can certainly be traces of it. The situation is similar to the dual number. That said, looking for such traces is interesting. Here is ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
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Impersonal Verbs: Are Active Transitives Possible?

Here is a couple of examples from Plautus that could be relevant for your question: a. Personal use of a transitive verb like decet: contempla ut haec (vestis) me deceat (Pl. Most. 172). 'See how ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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3 votes
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Koine greek: how to distinguish Middle & Passive voice

As fdb says, the middle and passive voice aren't completely identical: in two specific tenses (the future and aorist), they're distinct. For example, "I will be released" is λυθήσομαι, while "I will ...
Draconis's user avatar
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2 votes

Koine greek: how to distinguish Middle & Passive voice

First of all, it is not correct that middle and passive voice have completely the same forms. In the Koine, as in classical Attic, the middle and passive have distinct forms in the aorist and future ...
fdb's user avatar
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2 votes

Koine greek: how to distinguish Middle & Passive voice

Look for a construction that is incompatible with middle or passive voice. If the verb has a direct object, by definition it cannot be passive. If the sentence has an agent expressed through 'upo, ...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
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2 votes

Do non-deponent Latin verbs ever have a "middle voice"?

Third time lucky! Here is then my third try in answering Draconis's intriguing question ("do we ever see non-deponent verbs with passive morphology, but able to take accusative direct objects and not ...
Mitomino's user avatar
  • 8,501
1 vote

Do non-deponent Latin verbs ever have a "middle voice"?

As comments-section grows, this is not so much an answer as an interpretation of Mitomino's "flava caput nectentur oliva": the assertion that "caput" is an accusative; not a nominative. Expressions ...
tony's user avatar
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1 vote

Koine greek: how to distinguish Middle & Passive voice

Actually modern research has shown that it is better to think of the future and aorist as also only having a distinction between the active and middle voice, and not having a distinct passive voice. ...
Lt13's user avatar
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