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21 votes
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Can "ee" appear in Latin?

First, Galilaee sounds right. See this question about the vocative of Gnaeus for details. There are situations where one finds -ee- in Latin without the first e belonging to ae. What I found is not ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
20 votes
Accepted

What is the vocative of Gnaeus?

I searched for the vocative form Gnaee in several corpora but did not find any results. A general web search seems to reveal only automatically generated vocatives, which I would not lend much ...
brianpck's user avatar
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19 votes

Why not "Agne Dei"?

I found the question very interesting, and got me researching against my will. Most of the texts of the Mass —and specifically these— come from antiquity, a time when Latin was still alive. Had there ...
Rafael's user avatar
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14 votes
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Is any word attested in both vocative and locative?

Corinthus City names regularly have locative forms (identical to the genitive singular), and it is not too rare for them to be addressed with a vocative, which takes the regular ending -e if the name ...
Asteroides's user avatar
  • 29.5k
13 votes

Why is "O felicem virum, beatum Ioseph" in the accusative case here?

The vocative is used when addressing someone. The fact that it isn't used in the first part of this prayer makes me think that that portion is not meant to be addressed to Joseph (unlike the "Ora ...
Asteroides's user avatar
  • 29.5k
12 votes

Can "ee" appear in Latin?

The Vulgata is full with proper nouns having double -ee, specially as endings (e.g. Bersabee, Phacee, Osee). I imagine you are not particularly interested in these. Below are all the other words I ...
luchonacho's user avatar
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12 votes
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Why not "Agne Dei"?

I compared the Latin Gloria with the Greek Doxa: Greek language has much more vocative forms than Latin. In the Doxa series of vocatives alternate with series of nominatives, mostly with the article "'...
Carlo VAN GESTEL's user avatar
10 votes

What is the vocative of Gnaeus?

Eureka, as the scientist said. J. L. Vives, 16th century humanist, uses the vocative of Gnæus Pompeius in Pompeius Fugiens (page 136 of the Brill edition of his early writings, volume I). Brill spells ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
  • 16.6k
9 votes
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Difference between Vocative and Accusative usage

The vocative is the case used for addressing someone. If you said to your friend Mike, "Hey, Mike, I think your sister is swell," "Mike" would be in the vocative case. Or if you found someone in your ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
  • 16.6k
9 votes

Is any word attested in both vocative and locative?

I prefer the vocative to be distinct from the nominative, if possible. One word that does have a distinct locative and a distinct vocative is: animus The vocative is plentiful in both Plautus and ...
cmw's user avatar
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9 votes
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Do vocative forms of participles exist?

In Martial 8,75 it says Hic mihi de multis unus, Lucane, videtur, Cui merito dici 'mortue Galle' potest. “Mortue Galle” was (or so commentators claim) a term from gladiatorial fights; the Murmillo ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
8 votes

Is any word attested in both vocative and locative?

Domus This doesn't fulfill your second criterion, because the vocative looks exactly the same as the nominative (i.e. it's not second declension masculine). But it's famously one of the common nouns ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 68.1k
8 votes

Can "ee" appear in Latin?

Rarely ee can be used as geminatio vocalium, i.e. to denote that the e is pronounced long. This was mainly used in Oscan and sometimes borrowed to Latin. For example leege in this inscription: ...
Vladimir F Героям слава's user avatar
7 votes
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When were neuter nouns used in the vocative?

Defining the vocative: something like "a form used for address" I didn't give a definition of "vocative" in my original question, but it seems like it might be worthwhile, since there are a few ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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7 votes
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How to use apposition with vocative?

I believe all of those options are possible. [This paragraph is partly wrong; I should correct it sometime. The rest should be correct. The vocative on -e only came to Latin relatively late, although ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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7 votes
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Vocative Gerund

I've never seen the gerund used in the vocative, and a search for -ende in the Packhum corpus turned up nothing but imperatives. But I would be very surprised if such a form existed. The gerund in ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 68.1k
6 votes

How do you address someone in a case other than the vocative?

I think both constructions are possible, but do not have the same connotation. Confiteor Deo […] et vobis fratribus would have a meaning like "I confess to God ... and to you (who are my) brothers"; ...
varro's user avatar
  • 4,698
6 votes

Why not "Agne Dei"?

Jungmann in his magisterial work on the Roman Mass suggests that this is in keeping with a grammatical rule in many languages: from a feeling of reverence, religious terms are apt to be handled as ...
Milton Walsh's user avatar
5 votes

Do vocative forms of participles exist?

Sure! Try to do this kind of search: https://latin.packhum.org/search?q=iture
qwertxyz's user avatar
  • 2,906
5 votes

"Populus Romanus Quiritium" as vocative?

It does indeed look like direct address where the author forgot to use vocative, but it is not the only option. It is possible to read your sentence this way: Listen to me kindly and carefully, as ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
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"Deus meus", aut "Deus mī"?

First, the empirical facts, which are pretty much beyond controversy. In classical Latin, there is no (textually secure*) attested vocative form of deus. That is, dee does not exist, and deus is ...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
  • 6,941
4 votes
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How do you address someone in a case other than the vocative?

No, forms of address are always in the vocative and are syntactically independent - they are extraclausal (Pinkster 2015: 1224). However, appositives agree with the head (in case, gender, and number),...
Alex B.'s user avatar
  • 11.7k
4 votes

What is the proper parsing of "macte virtute"?

hi everybody! The question is very controversial, truly. But there are some elements on which we can construct an answer. Firts I would like to start with a quote of the french author Chateaubriand, ...
Umberto Verdura's user avatar
4 votes

How to use apposition with vocative?

It is not true that the vocative in -e is late, that "Latin had no separate vocative at first", nor that the vocative is borrowed from Greek. On the contrary, the use of the bare stem of nouns for the ...
fdb's user avatar
  • 17.9k
4 votes

Is any word attested in both vocative and locative?

Just lucky first search attempt: eheu! quam fatuae sunt tibi, Roma, togae! (Mart.Ep.10.19.4). There are actually many more instances of Rome being addressed.
d_e's user avatar
  • 11.2k
4 votes

Do vocative forms of participles exist?

The very opening line of Horace's Odes goes: Maecenas atavis edite regibus… You Maecenas, who descend from ancestors that were kings… The vocative of the participle editus plays a prominent role. ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes

When were neuter nouns used in the vocative?

Neuter plural in "o tempora, o mores" (Cicero, as classical as you can get).
fdb's user avatar
  • 17.9k
3 votes
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"Populus Romanus Quiritium" as vocative?

This question has now been answered by Cerberus, though his answer was posted in regard to a different (related) question. It seems that there are examples from Livy and Lucan (at least) of the form ...
TKR's user avatar
  • 31.4k
2 votes

"Populus Romanus Quiritium" as vocative?

(I would leave this as a comment but it's too long, so.) For what it's worth, there seem to be two translations of Julius Caesar into Latin, and both are useless for determining what's "correct" here,...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
  • 16.6k
2 votes

Why not "Agne Dei"?

I can't help but wonder whether there is an assumed "es" ("you are") in these phrases. Finite forms of "esse" are often severely abbreviated or even omitted in Latin. "[You are] the holy, holy, holy ...
Figulus's user avatar
  • 4,771

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