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Probably you refer to the event that involved the speakers Mario Capanna and Otto von Habsburg. Capanna was an extreme left-wing Italian member, who made a speech in Latin in the session of November 13th, 1979. It seems that one of the few to understand his speech was the Euro MP Otto von Habsburg, a direct descendant of the Royal House of the Austro-...


6

OLD defines the noun crepitus as 'A short sharp sound or a succession of such sounds, a creaking, cracking, crashing, clashing, etc.' This noun and related words are used to cover a fairly wide range of phenomena, such as the rattling of arrows in a quiver, the chattering of teeth, the fall of hail of a roof, the clicking of a bird's bill, the crackling of ...


4

There are a couple of Finnish words for a click in the phonetic sense, one of them having a Latin origin. One of the words we use is avulsiivi, which would correspond to avulsive in English but such a term does not seem to exist in this meaning in English. The Latin word avulsio refers to the tearing out of a branch of a tree, and the Finnish phonetic term ...


4

In the Czech Republic there are many diplomas issued in Latin (definitely the largest Charles University does so) and hence official translation services are available. The services do include translations into English and German, because that's what Czechs need the translations for, the Latin original is normally accepted here just fine. For example: ...


4

Since I was looking at Ainsworth (previous question) I followed his proposal: permitto submit for approval, L&S thinks submitto and permitto are both rather submissively inhibited. Try instead: Commendo com-mendo (conm- ), āvi, ātum, 1, v. a. 1. mando, I. Prop. A. Lit., implying a physical delivery, to deposit with, intrust to; constr. ...


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Listeners. It's an agent noun made from ausculto.


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Well, a search for "Vatican" and "Latin translator" put me on to this guy, Daniel Gallagher, who has left the priesthood and has joined the Classics faculty at Cornell, "[a]fter eight years at the Vatican translating the pope’s messages – sermons, letters, even tweets – into Latin ..." You can read the rest of the article here. Which is really just ...


3

The Colombian Ministry of External Relations can produce an official certificate that Colombia has no official translators between Latin and Spanish: https://www.traduccionesbogota.com/la-guia-definitiva-de-traducciones-en-bogota-colombia/


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I found this service when I searched Google: Scholaro Translation They specifically mention translating diplomas from Latin, and are a member of the American Translators Association. I don't know whether that carries much weight in and of itself, though, since I'm not familiar with that association. They also mention their translations are accepted world ...


2

"Appendix V" of the book Conversational latin for oral proficiency contains three pages of computer terms (vid. infra a selection of them: e.g., computatrulum portabile for "laptop". NB: I've just googled for a while and it seems that the more frequent term is computatrum portabile, i.e., without any diminutive suffix). Computatrum gestabile is another ...


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Duolingo has just released Latin as a language to learn. Here is the flag they ended up using: Here is how it looks in the app:


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I agree that computatrum is good for 'computer' (and so, incidentally, did the Pope's Latin Secretary — thirty or so years ago, though he also advocated computatorium). But the main thing here is surely to convey the idea of portability, leading me to suggest computatrum portandum; in the proper context, just as 'laptop computer' is shortened to a single ...


1

I suggest, primarily, corruptor, which Smith's translates as 'undoer, misleader, corrupter, seducer, briber', any of which seems to bear the right kind of coonotation. Also possible is testis falsus or testis corruptus, 'false witness', each of which is listed in Pyper's 'Gradus'. The first of these occurs in the Vulgate (Proverbs 19:5), testis falsus ...


1

I would suggest pupula fallax. Pupulus and pupula mean a puppet, and fallax ("deceptive", "deceitful") captures the nature of puppetry quite well. The English word does not literally refer to anything nefarious. As I am not aware of a Latin word that carries a suitable connotation, some amount of explanation is in order. Therefore I added fallax. Choosing ...


1

Sperae secundum fratrem J. de Pech'm The Spheres according to brother John Pecham This is the title of a one-page summary in BL Arundel 83 f123r There is no direct link; use the page list to get from f117 to f123v. Picture of Spheres. Pecham draws heavily on Cicero's 'Dream of Scipio.' where the the planets each inhabit their own orbs or rather globus ...


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