22

A Latin professor in a classical highschool in Italy adopted the translation virus coronarium that appeared on this article of Ephemeris, an online newspaper in Latin, published on February 22. The professor gave the article as a test for his students to show them the ductility of Latin even for present matters. This translation is somewhat officially ...


20

Basically, your second option is correct. There is the Vatican's Lexicon Recentis Latínitátis, referred to in the comment, but its approach to Latin is very idiosyncratic; debates over neologisms often get incredibly acrimonious, if you can believe it, but there are (VERY roughly) two schools: the "Ciceronian," in which making up words for concepts that didn'...


16

You seem to be addressing several issues in this question. To start from the bottom line: Latin is already being used right now as a daily casual language. Not even a small reserve about this statement. The external world changes, and new words are born. It happens in every language and Latin is no exception to that. New words are finally integrated into the ...


13

The word to use is probably macellum. Lewis & Short offers: macellum, i (macellus, i, m., Mart. 10, 96, 9), n. root μαχ-; cf. Gr. μάχομαι, to fight; cf. μάχαιρα, μάχη, and mactāre; prop. butcher's stall, shambles; hence, transf., meat-market, provision-market (where flesh, fish, and vegetables were sold). Lit.: venio ad macellum, rogito pisces, Plaut. ...


13

Latin is used regularly within the Vatican and Catholic Church, so depending on what you mean by daily usage I think that fulfills that requirement. There are also a lot of loan words that make their way into modern Latin, both historically and currently. For example, Vicipaedia, the Latin version of Wikipedia. Latin is also used regularly on this site for ...


11

For “online” you could say: colligatus (from colligare) conexus (from conectere, note: long o, single n!) Thus for “offline” you could say: incolligatus inconexus Or you could go a different route and say: seiunctus (from seiungere), or alternatively: disiunctus (from disiungere) These would be technical terms describing the state of a software program ...


10

There have already been a few answers, but I have always liked the Morgan and Silva Furman University Lexicon, so here are the terms it gives for "cafe": thermopolium, -i, n. taberna cafearia cafeum cauponula deversorium taberna caldaria domus cafearia This corroborates Ben Kovitz's answer, and provides several other options. The last few options ...


9

A key feature of the Winter Bash is having hats. A particular kind of hat, pilleus also played a role in the Roman Saturnalia. To emphasize the role of hats, I would suggest Saturnalia pilleata.


9

Probably you refer to the event that involved the speakers Mario Capanna and Otto von Habsburg. Capanna was an extreme left-wing Italian member, who made a speech in Latin in the session of November 13th, 1979. It seems that one of the few to understand his speech was the Euro MP Otto von Habsburg, a direct descendant of the Royal House of the Austro-...


9

One option is to turn the determiner "corona" into an adjective. That would lead to something like virus coronatum, "a crowned virus". I think it makes sense to keep the word virus in Latin, although it is much broader than in English; the risk of misinterpretation is very small. By "crowned" I do not mean royal in any sense, ...


8

De hac re nullam auctoritatem superiorem scio quam @NemoOudeis, qui vocabulum taberna caffearia sive in brevi taberna scribit: https://twitter.com/search?q=%40nemooudeis%20taberna


8

I would suggest that if the Romans knew about coffee, it would most likely come via Greek, since coffee originated even further to the East in Ethiopia. The Modern Greek word for "cafe" is καφενείο, so I would suggest remodeling that as a Classical Greek καφενεῖον and then Latinizing that. I think either caphenion or capheneum would be acceptable.


8

I can think of many ways of going about this, but for such an unapologetically modern idea I think the best approach may be to observe how other related modern languages have solved this problem and extrapolate how a similar transformation might work. Spanish: googlear Portuguese: googlar Italian: googlare French, though, seems to be a hold-out: I have ...


8

David Morgan's lexicon (warning: big file) suggests citatus, -a, -um for "express" in this context. His suggestions for "express train" are: tramen* citatum, hamaxostichus* citatus (The * indicates that it is a modern word found after AD 1400. I won't comment on which is better, since that's not really the OP's question.) Here are some ...


8

Languages don't usually have flags Very few languages have flags per se. For example, the Finnish flag stands for Finland, a constitutionally bilingual country, not the Finnish language, which is also spoken outside Finland to some extent. There is no flag for the Finnish language. Nor for English as far as I know. Some languages can be easily identified ...


8

Roman letters often included the name of both sender and recipient in the greeting. Take, for example, Cicero's letters to Atticus. Epistula 1.1 Scr. Romae m. Quint. a. 689 (65). CICERO ATTICO salutem Epistula 14.5 Scr. Asturae it Id. Apr. a. 710 (44). CICERO ATTICO S. D. Epistula 14.14 Scr. in Cumano a. d. v K. Mai. a. 710 (44). ...


7

Fieri solet ut charta mundatoria sit in capulo binis modibus ponenda. In vulgus gratus est modus quo charta procidit summo de volumine. In altero modo retro decidit charta iuxta parietem. I think that you need to keep it simple, without inventing such a word as orientatio. Would cursus be neater, do you think?


6

After searching for classical words that were used to similar effect, I have two suggestions for the word account: breviarium and summarium. My preference is for breviarium, which means "a summary, abridgment, abstract, epitome" and which, when combined with rationum, means "statistical view". Here are some example usages: Commentarios, quos desideras, ...


6

As I've mentioned elsewhere, I'm not a huge fan of Vicipædia, and this is part of the reason why. Technologia informátiónis is fine as far as a literal translation of the words, but it feels very un-Latinate. I'd go for something like ars computátrális or the simple word computátrália.


6

This was cited in the answer to a recent question as the de facto standard for Latin technology vocabulary by C. M. Weimer. Acording to it, the verbs corruo and collabor are enough for a soft crash. L&S cites corruo as to fall, sink to the ground and with an active meaning of someone to ruin sth. Meanwhile, collabor is more explicit in meaning to fall ...


6

Regarding Linux, there seem to have never existed such OS (but non existence hard to prove). As this is an open-source OS, it is based on collaboration, and as such, translation are made by enthusiasts of a given Language. There have been efforts in the past, like KDE and Gnome, but both seem dead. The only project I could find to be still "alive", albeit ...


6

Certainly, ius indicates the right to take some sort of action, so I should think that either ius itineris ('right of route') or ius transitus ('right of crossing') would be generally suitable as a traffic instruction (and, being more direct and powerful, preferable to using facultas, another possibility). For the party conceding right of way, transitum ...


6

As you say, the concept of digits is only meaningful if you are using Indian/Arabic numbers. These became known in Latin Europe by the 12th century, and with them the use of “digitus” for the numbers from 0 to 9. This usage is not classical, but it is of respectable antiquity.


6

ON "PLATFORM": Crepidinem seems most suitable for 3 reasons: crepidinem is the most visually interesting in English This assessment is, of course, subjective, but aesthetics are subjective, and a major factor in word choice in translation. (In my case, this term makes me think of delicious words like crepuscular, incites curiosity as to the meaning, and ...


6

I am a novice student of Latin. I found the following summary from the Department of the Classics at the University of Illinois in Urbana - Champaign rewarding. I've reproduced it here in part, and highlighted in bold some of the parts that I believe address your request. I note this is not my personal nor anecdotal experience. Why Study Latin? 1) ...


6

The Oxford English Dictionary indicates that the O in audio, video and radio comes from the O found in Greek compounds, which was used in scientific vocabulary built from Latin and Greek roots: e.g. audiology or radiometer. Note that the Etymonline entry for audio actually seems to say the same thing: abstracted from word-forming element audio- (q.v.), ...


6

OLD defines the noun crepitus as 'A short sharp sound or a succession of such sounds, a creaking, cracking, crashing, clashing, etc.' This noun and related words are used to cover a fairly wide range of phenomena, such as the rattling of arrows in a quiver, the chattering of teeth, the fall of hail of a roof, the clicking of a bird's bill, the crackling of ...


6

So, I'd recommend something like this: Cursores, parate vos, ite/decurrite! Literally: Runners, prepare yourselves... Go/Run! With paro you would want to use a pronoun reflexively, as the verb is transitive (takes a direct object). An important thing to remember when translating is that a literal translation is often not the best one. You have to bear in ...


6

Apicius provides us De re coquinaria, so a form of that probably works. Do-It-Yourself guides would fall under the technical genre, which I don't believe the ancients ever fully labeled, but we could perhaps use the Greek didactica, from which we get the English "didactic." Travel guides were already a thing in antiquity. Strabo's was simply called ...


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