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10 votes
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Shouldn't be "intravisset" instead of "intrasset"?

Intrāsset is what is commonly called a syncopated form of intrāvisset. In verb forms built on the perfect stem, which includes the pluperfect, -vi- or -ve- can just be omitted, with no change in ...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
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9 votes
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How did the contracted perfect passive work?

"Latest" here is a contraction of "late est", with late an adverb, as you suggested: "...lātē est altēque videndum". There is no perfect passive involved here. The same ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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9 votes
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Saint Augustine letter to Nebridio

Mittaturne is the verb mittatur + the -ne enclitic, which turns the sentence into a question. Mittatur should then be easier to parse: 3rd person, singular, present, subjunctive passive. The reason ...
cmw's user avatar
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8 votes
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Why does "abesse" have a present active participle while "adesse" does not?

Frequency of use, really! Originally, esse had a perfectly regular present participle—or at least as regular as a verb like esse can be. This was sōns, sontis, inherited from PIE *h₁sonts. However, ...
Draconis's user avatar
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7 votes
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Syntax of sentences with the verb "pudet"

As you have seen, the syntax of pudet-type verbs is not an easy topic. Here I will limit myself to answering the questions you have included in your post: (In the example) "Nōnne tē pudet hoc ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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7 votes
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Verb splitting noun and adjective

The phenomenon at issue here is what is referred to as "hyperbaton": please click on this link for a definition of this term and for some varied examples from Ancient Greek and Latin. Note, ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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6 votes
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How one can say "The door opened" in Latin?

I believe I've found one example from Ovid(correct me if I'm wrong) where se movet and movetur are attested in the perfect to mean "changed/moved" “sunt, o fortissime, quorum forma semel ...
d_e's user avatar
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6 votes

How can I express "to make a wish"?

A relatively literal translation would be votum facere (literally, “make a prayer”), although it generally seems to be used in the plural, e.g. Cic. Pro Milone 76: Imperium ille si nactus esset, ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
6 votes
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How can I express "to make a wish"?

"Making a wish" seems to me to be essentially "making a prayer" to some unknown power in hopes that it will be granted. In that case, I might offer preces precari, "to make ...
cmw's user avatar
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5 votes

Why is the verb of the main clause not in the infinitive in this oratio obliqua?

Leaving aside the matter of it being an indirect command, about which Draconis is right, you can do indirect speech with an ACI (accusative + infinitive) construction, but it's the main verb of the ...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
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5 votes
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Why is the verb of the main clause not in the infinitive in this oratio obliqua?

The key is, this is not an indirect statement (which generally uses an accusative and infinitive), but an indirect command (which generally uses the subjunctive). Caesar isn't stating a fact, here; he'...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes

Verb usage with spend and waiting

Before discussing the verbs, let us first take a look at the construction/grammar. There are several ways to have negative imperative. The most common are "Noli/Nolite + infitive" or "...
d_e's user avatar
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4 votes

How one can say "The door opened" in Latin?

Perhaps Ov. Am. 3.8.7 would count as an example: Cum bene laudavit, laudato ianua clausa est. Even though she praises my text, the door has/is closed for the praised one. (my quick translation) ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
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Questions on reading the prologue of Aesopus Latinus via LLPSI

To answer the easy questions first: Dos does originally mean dowry. But the word over time came to be used to express something like “excellent quality, particular value,” etc. Lewis & Short ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
3 votes

Questions on reading the prologue of Aesopus Latinus via LLPSI

This is just a partial answer to the OP's question and a follow-up commentary on Sebastian's correct answer to what he refers to as the "difficult question". In my opinion, what is really &...
Mitomino's user avatar
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3 votes
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Why don't "number" and "count" have the same root?

Assuming by "they" you mean the Romans who spoke Latin, they did in fact turn numerus into a verb: numero, numerare. nŭmĕro , āvi, ātum, 1, v. a. numerus, I. to count, reckon, number (syn. ...
cmw's user avatar
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3 votes

effeminare = evirare (?)

This very recent question reminded me of the older one above [note for the coordinators: I don't know if I have to answer here or there]. Cerberus put forward what appears to be -at least initially- a ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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3 votes
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"To sound (like)" in Latin

Interesting question! You are right when saying that the English verb sound appears to act as a "sensory copula" in some examples (e.g. 'it sounds good'; cf. the same use with other verbs: '...
Mitomino's user avatar
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2 votes
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How to say "to (de)centralize" in Latin?

Some suffixes used for derivation of verbs from nouns or adjectives in Latin are: -ficō, -ficāre: native Latin suffix related to verb faciō, facere -issō, -issāre: suffix borrowed from Ancient Greek ...
Arfrever's user avatar
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2 votes

When and how did the distinction between the gerund and the gerundive develop?

The gerundive grew out of the gerund. The passive periphrastic (gerundive + esse) used to have a gerund governing the accusative instead, e.g. agitandum est vigilias instead of agitandae sunt vigiliae....
2 votes

How can I express "to make a wish"?

The existing suggestions are probably better, but there is yet another option optare votis with several hits: stulte, quid haec frustra votis puerilibus optas (Ov.Tr.3.8.11) [Fool! why pray in vain ...
d_e's user avatar
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1 vote

How can I express "to make a wish"?

the distinction between fantasy wish and prayerful wish should be highlighted. the wishes given by nymphs and genius spirits (i apologize for the tautology) are realized via the optare verb.
Yaw Boakye's user avatar
1 vote

How one can say "The door opened" in Latin?

The perfect tense can be used in the active voice or the passive voice. It can also be used in ablative absolute constructions. We can express the idea "the door opened" in the following ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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