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11

It definitely isn't rare, and it definitely isn't found only in poetry. Any good Latin grammar will address this topic. In Gildersleeve and Lodge, Latin grammar, the index entry for esse includes a subentry for 'omitted.' The main section where this topic is treated is 209. It gives a general rule, examples, and then notes, including a note that addresses ...


7

It is a matter of counting, but I would consider it more natural to say that there are 3 instead of 6 persons. The point of the three-person view is that there is the additional property of "number". There are two numbers in Latin: singular and plural. (The dual number between the two has almost entirely vanished from Latin and it should be ...


7

Here's a partial answer. Common in proverbs, and possibly epitaphs, which are not exactly poetry. Nil desperandum,' 'Ars longa, Vita brevis,' The life so short, the craft so long to learn (Chaucer) 'Ad augusta per angusta,' Á des résultats augustes par des voies étroites. (quoted in Hernani: Victor Hugo) 'Amicus Plato, sed magis amica veritas,' ...


6

According to Perseus's morphology tool, this form comes from the compound εἰσ-άγω, "to lead into".


6

The most common usage of impleo is with the accusative and ablative. The accusative tells you what is being filled. The ablative tells you with what it is being filled. N.B. By analogy with plenus + gen. (= "full of X"), sometimes the genitive is used here instead. For example: Impleo poculum (acc.) vino (abl.) = "I fill the cup with wine." Augustine ...


5

In addition to the other answers, on specific conditions, one can also express an indefinite person using the present subjunctive(*) of the 2nd person singular. In a manner not not unsimilar to "Generic you" in English and other languages. According to A&G (§518) in general conditions : The subjunctive is often used in the 2nd person singular, ...


5

All three are fine! While there might be a slight difference in nuance, I would say that you can freely use any of them that feels best in that situation. There just turns out to be many ways to express the same things, and there are a great many other verbs for similar purposes like ingredi and intrare. There are examples in Lewis and Short: You can use ...


3

The verb veniunt doesn't work as directly with the gerundive (future passive participle) as you think. Omnia consideranda is "everything that must be considered", so it should be more along the lines of: [These] come before everything that must be considered. You can argue that the meaning is practically the same, but I think there is a meaningful ...


3

Fuerit is the perfect subjunctive of esse, you can look up such forms in a conjugation table like this. Part of learning Latin is guessing what form of what verb you might be looking at, and then confirming your guess in the dictionary if you do not know the verb by heart. This is a nice thing about printed dictionaries: Even if you do not find corrupi…, you ...


3

I do not know a Latin–English dictionary that gives simple, accessible, clearly structured usage notes for verbs and simple, stripped-down examples. If such a dictionary exists, I would expect it to be found in the educational market, catering to students of Latin in secondary school. I know this is an English language website, and non-English dictionaries ...


3

Here is a couple of examples from Plautus that could be relevant for your question: a. Personal use of a transitive verb like decet: contempla ut haec (vestis) me deceat (Pl. Most. 172). 'See how this dress suits me.' b. Impersonal use of a transitive verb like decet: ita ut vos decet (Pl. Most. 729). 'so as befits you'. The following example could also ...


3

Person vs. number When we speak, there are three kinds of roles being played: someone speaking, someone being spoken to, and someone or something else being spoken of. For example, "I (first person) told you (second person) that Chris (third person) went to the store." Grammatical person is the generic term for those roles. The first person is the ...


3

Your translation is actually almost perfect. The only small issue is that autem "however" never stands first in its clause; it would be better replaced with sed or at, both of which mean "but". The reason there are two infinitives in a row is that one way of expressing a negative command is noli plus infinitive, and in this case that ...


3

@brianpck is right, but it's worth adding that in the example quoted, "Sentio, iudices, moderandum mihi esse iam orationi meae fugiendamque vestram satietatem", Cicero had no choice about making "moderandum" impersonal: it has to be impersonal because, in this sense, "moderari" does not take an accusative direct object but ...


2

Possible examples: carcero, carcerare. Lewis and Short has an entry defining it as follows: to imprison, incarcerate (post-class.), Salv. Prov. 2, p. 53; Auct. Prog. Aug. 29. Pretty clearly based on the location noun carcer, and the entry seems to clearly define it as a location verb. I haven't examined the citations. corono, coronare. Lewis and Short ...


2

Cassell's Latin Dictionary has: enable = dat. of person + gen. of thing + facultatem facere facilitate = acc. of thing + faciliorem reddere The Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources (DMLBS) has "facilitare, to render easier, help." ( https://logeion.uchicago.edu/facilitare - attested AD 1412, plus a number of possibly earlier ...


2

I would say fugio is a better choice than evado.


2

As pointed out by Joonas, it is VERY important to give the relevant/full quotes (at least, in these cases). Otherwise, the poster can receive contradictory feedback. For example, Joonas answered as Cicero would probably did. Indeed, in Classical Latin the only interpretation/analysis of the first example is the one given by Joonas. However, it is the case ...


1

If you're using the 7th edition of Wheelock's Latin (the most recent edition), this is explained at the bottom of page 4: Note that the stem vowel has no macron in certain forms (e.g., moneō, laudānt); learn the following rule, which will make it easier to account for macrons that seem to disappear and reappear arbitrarily: Vowels that are normally long are ...


1

It looks like the verb you are looking for is very close semantically to allow/permit. Interestingly, you use allow in your question: "What I am after is a verb like "enable" or "facilitate" that would allow me to convey the idea concisely and flexibly". If indeed you can use "enable" instead "allow" in that ...


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