Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
15

It is called a catchword and is common in manuscripts and in early printed books. Usually it appears only on the verso (even-numbered pages) and it allows the bookbinders to make sure that nothing is missing and that the pages are in the right order. Sometimes a catchword will appear (as here) also on the recto (odd-numbered page), for purely aesthetic ...


11

I would say that is a common abbreviation for "-que". Maybe you could find useful Cappelli's Dizionario di Abbreviature latine (a very detailed repertory of latin abbreviations). Take a look here. Here is the phrase with the soluted words: silensq(ue) sisto tuumq(ue) I would add that this is not a ligature but an abbreviation, while -st- of the word ...


10

This 'typesetting leader' was widely in use from early printing times but was not universal, as your examples indicate. In English, it occurs, for example, in Gibbon's History of the Decline & Fall of the Roman Empire and, as @Alex B comments on your question, it certainly carried on, in English at least, well into the nineteenth century. As @fdb says, ...


6

The following is from the 'Variant forms' section of From Unicode to Typography, a Case Study: the Greek Script, by Yannis Haralambous (p 7–9). The paper was presented at the 14th International Unicode Conference (Boston, 1999). In the following instances, different letterforms have, at some times and in some places, been used, depending on the letter's ...


6

Beta comes to mind. From wikipedia In some high-quality typesetting, especially in the French tradition, a typographic variant of the lowercase letter without a descender is used within a word for ancient Greek: βίβλος is printed βίϐλος, As I hope you can see in the above quote, there is even a special Unicode point for it, incorrectly named GREEK BETA ...


6

It is just the way they write alpha. In the first one, for example: αναπαυσον την ψυχην αυτου μετα των αγιων ....


5

It must be que. The conjunction -que is very common in Latin, and it is no surprise it has it's own symbol. For example suumque is (almost) the same as et suum and means "and his own". The excerpt you have is a fragment, and the exact translation depends on more context.


4

It says Vn~, so vn with a general mark of abbreviation. This mark normally stands for -de if it is written above an -n at the end of a word (provided that -de fits), so it must be unde here, "whence". I've found an 18th-century print edition of the Sententiae of Petrus Lombardus that has a similar use of unde with partly the same text, and introducing the ...


4

1. Mendum Mendum corresponds exactly to this sense: Gaffiot mendum,¹⁴ ī, n., faute, erreur [dans un texte]mendum,¹⁴ ī, n., faute, erreur [dans un texte] : ; Att. 13, 23, 2 Lewis&Short a fault, error, blunder in writing (class.). Examples: quod mendum ista litura correxit?, Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 104 tantum librariorum menda tolluntur, Cic, Att.,...


3

I've even seen this in old books written in other languages as well (including Dutch, English and French). It's a thing they used to do, but usually stopped doing many years ago (it would be great if someone knew around what time this was, I suppose it has something to do with the (semi-)automation of printing). The reason you see it more in Latin books is ...


1

added for completeness Epsilon Epsilon also has two lowercase forms: ε and ϵ (also called lunate, just like the rounded sigma, or uncial.) The distinction seems to be mainly one of periods, not position. Uncial form was apparently predominant between IV and VIII centuries AD. Ligatures Interestingly enough, in medieval times, many letters developed not ...


1

Here is a partial answer. I don't know what kind of forms you can find in historical (e.g. medieval) documents. In normal current typographic practice, no In Latin texts that have been published in the present day by academic sources, you're unlikely to find ligatures of any kind. It's currently preferred to write "oe" (or "ae") as a digraph composed of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible