14

The word is reservaculum, "something used to keep things in", from reservo "keep (back)". I believe this word is used to describe the pouch of marsupials in similar texts from that period. Praesumably, this was before the word marsupial was invented, which is derived from Latin marsupium, "pouch". Incidentally, you have uon where it should be non. A plain ...


8

I can answer the second part, at least. That's a tilde ĩ, not a macron ī, and it's one of the most common scribal abbreviations, representing a following N or M. So anĩal, tẽpore, oblatũ = animal, tempore, oblatum. This is where the modern tilde used in Spanish and Portuguese comes from: Latin annum > anno > Spanish año "year". It originated as a small "N" ...


5

There are not many Latin-text sources for Phoenician-proper, only for its descendant/close relative Punic, the language of Carthage which was settled by Phoenician colonists from Tyre Luckily there is a reasonable body of Latin-text Punic including several inscriptions from Tunisia and Libya, as well as some lines of dialogue in Plautus' play Poenulus ("the ...


3

-ico- is a regular suffix forming an adjective from a noun. mĕlicus melodious. mĕlicae sonores, tuneful sounds (Lucretius) More promising is mēles, also mēlis, -is f. also mælis, a badger or pine marten. Source: Lewis&Short: Perseus Tufts The adjective melicus could mean .1. An actual badger kept for hunting wild bees. .2. Any grizzled animal; e....


2

If you wanted to pronounce it like: English scientific or legal Latin, it would be pronounced "jah-HOE-vee" If you wanted to give it an Ecclesiastical or modern-Roman pronunciation, it would be pronounced "yay-Oh-vay", with a silent H. If you wanted to pronounce it according to the Vox Latina textbook, which is popular these days in academic and educational ...


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