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1

I don't have any strong objections to the answer given by Figulus, but given the characteristic parsimony of the Latin tongue, I'm inclined to think that using participles instead of relative clauses would perhaps be even better, e.g.: Da panem, Domine, esurientibus, et eum habentibus famem iustitiae. I'm curious to hear whether this approach accords ...


2

I think that there is a third option, the generic subjunctive (Woodcock #155). "Remember that you were the kind of person who was a slave in Egypt, and that the Lord your God himself is the kind who led you out." There are probably other possible type as well. But I think your comment about the "hybrid" is a preceptive one. The subjunctive has so many uses ...


2

Da panem, Domine, eis qui esuriunt, et famem iustitiae eis qui panem habent. That seems more natural to me than what you had, Da panem, Domine, quibus ii esuriunt, et famem iustitiae quibus ii panem habent (The are hungry to whom give bread O Lord, and they have bread to whom (give) a hunger for justice.) I don't think it is necessarily wrong to put two ...


1

A somewhat loose translation, but one which I think captures the sense you're going for, could be: Mihi adsum. One common meaning of adsum is "to be present with one's aid or support; to stand by, to assist, aid, help, protect, defend, sustain". Placing mihi initially can give it some contrastive emphasis, so this sentence can mean "I stand by myself (in ...


0

The phrase, when conjugated the way you have, reads "Choose me, myself!" Your words do accomplish what you're looking for though-- a simple verb conjugation gives us "Ego seligo memet." This means "I choose myself." A short breakdown of the words you chose and their significances: Ego - This is a pronoun meaning "I." In this form, "I" is always the subject ...


10

Literally, I would say multōs annōs Latīnē locūtus sum, "I used to speak Latin for many years", or saeculīs praeteritīs Latīnē locūtus sum, "I used to speak Latin in ages past". If he wants to be a bit more ostentatious, though, he could say something like verba linguā Rōmānā multa saeculīs praeteritīs effātus sum, "I used to speak many words in the Roman ...


5

If you want a simple classical translation of "I used the language for many years" one would say "Lingva Latina per multos annos utebar." There may be more elegant or poetic ways to put in in literature somewhere, so keep your mind open.


5

The German–Latin dictionary Neues Latein Lexikon, 1998 edition, offers: aeronavis, is, f (Cited after the Lexicon Latinum Hodiernum. The N.L.L. is supposed to be a translation of the Vatican's Italian–Latin Lexicon Recentis Latinitatis, infamous for its lengthy circumlocutions. The online edition of the latters offers aëria navis, which is more in keeping ...


3

I keep on bringing up this bit from Ovid's Cleopatra Ode on the Stack Exchange: "Nunc est bibendum." One could translate this phrase as 'Now must be drunk = Now is the time for drinking.' This phrase has imagery reminiscent of a battle and dancing. And it has a phrase about bringing down a fine wine from the ancestral cellars. This to me could be what you'...


3

You have a lot of creative freedom with that, and you could probably generate some interesting conversation in our chat with it. That said, here would be my answer: Your declension is correct. Soli is genitive and major is nominative. Maior probably has an implied (pars). This is probably the most generic and understandable translation. Maior could be ...


1

It is all but meaningless to translate a single word. If your teacher does not think so, ask him or her to translate the English word “have” to Latin, or Spanish, or Chinese, or any other language; it is downright impossible. I will explain in a minute why this is especially true of videre, a seemingly innocuous word which actually has a few surprising ...


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