10

Literally, I would say multōs annōs Latīnē locūtus sum, "I used to speak Latin for many years", or saeculīs praeteritīs Latīnē locūtus sum, "I used to speak Latin in ages past". If he wants to be a bit more ostentatious, though, he could say something like verba linguā Rōmānā multa saeculīs praeteritīs effātus sum, "I used to speak many words in the Roman ...


4

I don't have any strong objections to the answer given by Figulus, but given the characteristic parsimony of the Latin tongue, I'm inclined to think that using participles instead of relative clauses would perhaps be even better, e.g.: Da panem, Domine, esurientibus, et eum habentibus famem iustitiae. I'm curious to hear whether this approach accords ...


2

Da panem, Domine, eis qui esuriunt, et famem iustitiae eis qui panem habent. That seems more natural to me than what you had, Da panem, Domine, quibus ii esuriunt, et famem iustitiae quibus ii panem habent (The are hungry to whom give bread O Lord, and they have bread to whom (give) a hunger for justice.) I don't think it is necessarily wrong to put two ...


2

I think that there is a third option, the generic subjunctive (Woodcock #155). "Remember that you were the kind of person who was a slave in Egypt, and that the Lord your God himself is the kind who led you out." There are probably other possible type as well. But I think your comment about the "hybrid" is a preceptive one. The subjunctive has so many uses ...


1

A somewhat loose translation, but one which I think captures the sense you're going for, could be: Mihi adsum. One common meaning of adsum is "to be present with one's aid or support; to stand by, to assist, aid, help, protect, defend, sustain". Placing mihi initially can give it some contrastive emphasis, so this sentence can mean "I stand by myself (in ...


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