14

My suggestions in bold, followed by the classical examples that inspired them. madidus nasus / a wet nose madidique infantia nasi / and the wet noses of a child (Juvenal, Satires, 10.199) fluens pituita / streaming snot fluctus nasus / a streaming nose nasus fluxit pituita / a nose streaming with snot Pituita / slime, clammy moisture, phlegm is ...


13

Lustrum has several meanings, but that which applies here is the period of five years which elapsed from census to census. The phrase is actually lustris ante tribus, or 'three lustra ago'. A good dictionary will give further explanation, if you require it.


12

sŭbŏleo, -ēre (‘sub’ = a hint, a trace) to catch a whiff, to suspect. Plautus twice: referring to a wife, and later to the man under suspicion. Possibly the idiomatic answer is to refer to a well known example of suspicion: Hippolytus or Cassandra; or to this or another Fable. http://mythfolklore.net/aesopica/phaedrus/310.htm Piscosus, fishy, is no use ...


12

Plautus offers a colorful list of synonyms which all roughly translate as "idiot": Quicúmque ubi ubi sunt, quí fuerunt quiqué futuri sunt pósthac stultí, stolidi, fatuí, fungi, bardí, blenni, buccónes, solús ego omnis longe ántideo stultítia et moribus índoctis. (Pl Bacch 5.1) Riley's translation: Whoever there are in any place whatsoever, ...


12

I will not/never forget you = nōn/numquam tuī oblīviscar (The marks above the vowels are optional; they mark a pronunciation difference that disappeared in later Latin.) "I" is usually omitted in Latin, unless you want your identity to be very emphatic. The verb form makes it unambiguous without an extra word. nōn is "not", plain and simple. numquam is "...


12

Greece The Greek phrase is most famously preserved in the Republic, book 1, 332δ. In the quote, Polemarchus summarizes his interpretation of Simonides's definition of justice: ἡ οὖν δὴ τίσιν τί ἀποδιδοῦσα τέχνη δικαιοσύνη ἂν καλοῖτο; εἰ μέν τι, ἔφη, δεῖ ἀκολουθεῖν, ὦ Σώκρατες, τοῖς ἔμπροσθεν εἰρημένοις, ἡ τοῖς φίλοις τε καὶ ἐχθροῖς ὠφελίας τε καὶ ...


12

Memento precisely conveys that meaning, in my opinion. It is an imperative (like "do this", "do that"), which means "Remember!", as in "Do remember". This word is part of a very famous expression: memento mori. There are a few question on the meaning of such expression in this site. E.g. here.


11

Here are the Vulgate versions of the two verses you mention: Colossians 1.16: quoniam in ipso condita sunt universa in cælis, et in terra, visibilia, et invisibilia, sive throni, sive dominationes, sive principatus, sive potestates: omnia per ipsum et in ipso creata sunt Acts 17.28: In ipso enim vivimus, et movemur, et sumus: sicut et quidam ...


11

Liber is that Latin word for book, and my first inclination is to go there. However, further context is needed to make an actual decision. Other options include libellum and codex. Monumentum is most wrong. A book can be a monument, but not all monuments are books, and so likewise not all monumenta are libri. If you're refering to the Horace quote monumenta ...


11

I find memor to be rather evocative, so here's another straightforward translation: Semper memor ero tui. Rough translation: I will always be mindful of you. "Mindful" is a decent stand-in, though as far as I'm aware memor doesn't have the additional "watchful" meaning.


11

My dictionary offers four options for "striped": Virgatus "striped" (is used for striped clothing, at least in poetry and post-classically) Virgulatus "striped" (seems to be very similar to virgatus but less frequent) Both of these are from virga "twig", which is also used to mean "stripe" in clothing (II C). Ostreatus (striped or ridged like an oyster ...


10

In Medieval Latin, the word "ly" could be paired with the relevant term, which could then be treated as an indeclinable term. See for example these passages from St. Thomas Aquinas written in the 1250's: Quia ly se potest esse ablativi casus, et tunc simpliciter vera est: et est sensus: genuit alterum se, idest alterum a se. Vel potest esse accusativi ...


10

You're right that it's a gerundive of obligation, and thus requires a form of esse. However, it doesn't have to be expressed. Tacitus Annals 1.29 contains two without esse, though they're in indirect statements: certatum inde sententiis, cum alii opperiendos legatos atque interim comitate permulcendum militem censerent, alii fortioribus remediis agendum: ...


10

Actually, verbs translatable as "must", such as debet, necesse est and particularly oportet, do often express this type of epistemic (as opposed to deontic) meaning in Latin. This book chapter on "Mood and Modality" by Elisabetta Magni contains a large number of examples, as well as some statistics on the frequency of such usages for different verbs. Some ...


9

I would advise using Juvenal's phrase without revision: Sed quis custodiet ipsos / custodes? (Satire VI, 347-48) As Lewis & Short remarks in its entry for custos, the term can be used alone to refer to (watch)dogs. Here is one example from Virgil: Occupat Aeneas aditum custode sepulto, evaditque celer ripam inremeabilis undae. (Aeneid, VI, 424-...


9

One option here is sic vita est. A form of it, sic vita erat, appears in Publius Terentius's Andria: sic vita erat: facile omnis perferre ac pati; cum quibus erat quomque una îs sese dedere, Such was his life; readily to bear and comply with all; with whomsoever he was in company, to them to resign (translation source) The meanings of each of ...


9

I give some real examples taken from medieval latin: ex his praemissis haec sequitur conclusio (Saint Lawrence of Brindisi) sequitur ex praemissis ista conclusio (Ockham) haec / ista conclusio sequitur ex praemissis (Ockham) ex praedictis praemissis sequitur ista conclusio (Ockham) conclusio sequitur ex talibus praemissis (Ockham) ...


9

I think that both index and tabula ciborum work as calques but I can’t find any evidence for either in classical sources. Indeed, I can’t find any information about whether there even were menus at tabernae/popinae/cauponae. My understanding is that the foods were simply on display. I also can’t find any evidence for tabella cibariorum but I did find a ...


9

The translation given by Google Translate is, as typical with Latin, gibberish. Neither the BBC translation nor the intended meaning get close to what the Latin says. The quoted professor is being polite; it's a bit hard to translate nonsensical text. I really wish people stopped relying on Google Translate in matters of any importance. Trying to use ...


9

Give the context of the (mis)quote, I'd offer: Luca, ego pater tuus sum. In Latin, "your" is most often the adjective tuus, and thus declines with the noun it modifies. Because pater is masculine, so too would be tuus. If it were 'mother', then you'd have mater tua. The order pater tuus is assured, though tuus pater isn't impossible. There's no reason ...


9

There can't be a "definitive" translation, because the pseudo-Latin precedes the popularity of the English. That second link you offer is actually good. Henry Beard offers Noli nothi permittere te terere. Personally, I could see a few tweaks. Instead of nothi, I'd subsitute it with spurios (needs the accusative). Also, te terere sounds clumsy; I'd be ...


9

The exact phrase did not survive antiquity. The phrase as it stands comes from Plutarch's Life of Sulla 38.4, which was written in Greek, not Latin. You are right that it was an epitaph, but it was about Sulla, not Cato. Moreover, Plutarch doesn't even give an exact translation, but rather the "gist" of it: οὔτε τῶν φίλων τις αὐτὸν εὖ ποιῶν οὔτε τῶν ...


9

In botanical Latin, the following terms are used: helicte - clockwise antihelicte - counter-clockwise


9

Hoc (here hoc is simply 'this.') opusculum This little work, , quamdiu vixero, for as long as I shall live, doctioribus (here dative after offero) to those more learned emendandum offero I offer for [their] correction. What a generous dedication. Can it possibly be recent?


8

Catullus 51 (Ille mi par esse deo videtur…) is a fairly literal translation of a very famous poem by Sappho (φαίνεταί μοι κῆνος ἴσος θέοισιν).


8

For someone who has "nil" knowledge of Latin grammar, I'm really impressed with your attempt: there's only one grammatical error and the meaning is fairly clear. First, a grammar correction: internexus is presumably a neologism derived from nexus, which is the 4th declension. You will thus want to use the ablative singular form: In internexu potes esse ...


8

I suggest that simple word order would also do the trick here: Marcus locutus est dux [or procurator or whatever].


8

The most general words for 'school' are ludus and schola, the latter usually being reserved for more advanced students. (You might also like academia, but it really refers to a place for philosophical discussion, rather than instruction.) There is a choice of adjectival name for Rochester : Durobrivensis (from the oldest name, something like 'Durobrivae'), ...


8

Conperio and comperio are just variant spellings, and the same with reperio and repperio. The "normal" words though are comperio and reperio. That said, the word I've come across the most for "I discover" is invenio, so that's the one I would go with. It's also the most neutral and obvious choice, as some of the other ones could potentially mean other ...


8

The sentence has more than one possible meaning in English that might slightly alter the way you may want to translate it into Latin. Suppose that you want to put emphasis in something like the fact that a group of individuals usually lacks the complete unity of a single organism/person/entity. This seems an obvious meaning for the sentence, especially ...


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