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14 votes

"Solvitas perambulum": Is this real Latin?

This seems to be a distortion of the phrase solvitur ambulando "it is solved by walking". As fdb says, neither word is correct Latin.
TKR's user avatar
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12 votes
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Translation of “in” as “and”

The passage comes from Cic. Fam. 9.4, namely from a letter to Varro. Apparently others have translated as you would expect: If you have a garden in your library, everything will be complete (...
Rafael's user avatar
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12 votes

How can I properly translate possessive form of nouns?

In general, don't focus on every word having an equivalent in the other language. For example, the single word magistrō would generally be translated into multiple words like "to the master"....
Draconis's user avatar
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10 votes

"Solvitas perambulum": Is this real Latin?

This is fake Latin, but formed from two genuine words: solvo means “to release, set free, solve” and perambulo means “to walk through”; but neither “solvitas” nor “perambulum” means anything in Latin. ...
fdb's user avatar
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8 votes
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What conjunctive function does "ruat caelum" have in "Fiat justitia, ruat caelum"?

No ellipsis of cum needs to be assumed. A bare subjunctive can also be used with concessive force. One example is Cicero, In Verrinem 2.5.4: sit fur, sit sacrilegus, sit flagitiorum omnium ...
cnread's user avatar
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7 votes
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Is there a better translation for the family motto "Fama candida rosa dulcior"?

As written, the motto is ambiguous. The only word whose function is immediately obvious is dulcior, a comparative adjective meaning "sweeter." The nominative ending (short -a) and the ...
brianpck's user avatar
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6 votes
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"Non splendeat toga, ne sordeat quidem"

This would fit under definition 6.b for nē in OLD: not...either, neither. Therefore, 'Your toga should not be bright (but) not dingy either.' In fact, the OLD entry cites this passage. Others that ...
cnread's user avatar
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6 votes
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Ipsí nihil per sé sine eó facere potuérunt

Unfortunately, both translations might indeed be a bit pleonastic since both ipsi and per se are translated to very similar sets of words in both English and Spanish. However, per se and ipse have ...
Theophylactus's user avatar
6 votes
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Questions for Regulus

I'll address each question in order: Translation of "pencil" Regarding the translation of "pencil" (French: "crayon"), the word is graphis, -idis, which is a Latinization ...
brianpck's user avatar
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6 votes
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Hí Cicerónem ipsum sécum iúnxérunt, nam eum semper díléxerant

Your translation seems fine to me except: "these of Cicero" makes no sense and is not found in the Latin -- hi is just "these" (people, men, senators, etc.). you got the tense of ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
5 votes

Questions for Regulus

[1] For graphida, you would have had to recognize the classic 3rd declension ending -is, -idis, which is common among words of Greek origin. That makes the word in question graphis, which can mean a ...
cmw's user avatar
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5 votes
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Quisque ipse sé díligit, quod quisque per sé sibi cárus est

Note that there is no subjunctive in the second part, and that quod has a lot of alternative meanings. One relevant meaning of quod that seems to apply here is because: Everyone loves themselves ...
Rafael's user avatar
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5 votes

How would you translate "purposefulness"?

The quality of sticking to a purpose is probably well expressed by constantia animi or simply constantia, which Lewis & Short define as: “Firmness of character, steadfastness, immovability, ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Why is "se" used with "secum" in this quote from Livy?

Lewis and Short include this on infero: Se, to betake one's self to, repair to, go into, enter, esp. with the accessory notion of haste and rapidity. That is, se inferre means more or less "to ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes

"Non splendeat toga, ne sordeat quidem"

I think the most likely reading is simply "your toga should be neither fancy nor dirty". I would not try to give individual meanings to ne and quidem, as ne quidem is a pretty common set ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Némó fíliam acerbam cónsulis ipsíus diú díligere potuit

Your translation is correct. Consulis ipsius means exactly what you translated it to, both in Spanish (del mismísimo cónsul) and English (of the consul himself). As for the meaning of the whole ...
Theophylactus's user avatar
2 votes

Implied pronouns

In English, practically every noun needs to be marked with a determiner. You can't just know fate; you have to know Fate, or a fate, or the fate, or your fate, or this fate, and so on. In Latin, they'...
Draconis's user avatar
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