12

The oneri is a dative of purpose or dativus finalis. A simple example of such a dative is id mihi usui est, "it is of use to me". There are often two datives: the beneficiary and the beneficial thing itself. The other dative can be seen as a dativus commodi. As a whole, this is known as the double dative construction. The two datives play different ...


11

Latin has an inchoative suffix -sc- which indicates that a certain state is beginning, and which is quite productive (rubesco, senesco, reconvalesco, ...). And indeed, there is the verb amasco – "to begin to love", so that you could say hanc linguam amasco


10

In a footnote to his 1891 translation of the relevant sentence (page 294), J. S. Watson says this: 2 Video me a te circumveniri. Toup, in his Appendix to Theocritus, suggests that we should read Video me a te non circum, sed hircumveniri, referring to a similar joke of Aristophanes, Acharn. 850. (Out of haste, I originally misinterpreted the footnote as ...


9

The closest Greek equivalent to a Latin gerundive is one of the verbal adjectives ending in -τέος (formed on the aorist passive stem). Both ποιέω and πράττω – unlike ἄγω, as you note – are generally equivalent in sense to Latin ago when it means 'to do.' Therefore, the corresponding equivalents to the neuter plural gerundive agenda would be τὰ ποιητέα and τὰ ...


9

Oxford [English-to-Latin section (under "fall")], offers "adamo" = "to fall in love with", taking the accusative case. (In the Latin-to-English the definition of "adamo" is "to love passionately". I am always suspicious when the two sections fail to coincide.) Lewis & Short gives "to love truly, ...


7

The quote is an adaptation from Varro's Res rusticae 1.2: Sane, inquit Agrius, et simul cogitans portam itineri dici longissimam esse ad subsellia sequentibus nobis procedit. The English translation by W. D. Hooper and H. B. Ash is available online and reads: "By all means," replied Agrius; and reflecting that the longest part of the journey is ...


6

It literally means "[The] gods better!": di is the nominative plural of deus 'god', melius is the comparative adverb of bonus 'good'. The verb is omitted and will have to be deduced from whatever context you use it in; in the quoted case it's presumably something like viderunt (literally "the gods saw better"), but for exclamations ...


6

Quem The quem is part of quem ad modum (= ad quem modum), which is a common fixed phrase mean "how". The rest of the sentence The first thing to notice is the parallelism between the two halves of the second sentence: Si enim vere agere volueris, omnia tibi relinquo; sin dissimulare [volueris], tu quem ad modum his satis facias videris. The verb ...


6

The ut follows ea lege: ea lege, ut … under the condition that … The key is to question what ea lege is doing in that sentence, especially since there is no context talking about some legislation or other. Lex can occasionally be used with ut + subjunctive (e.g. lex erat apud Romanos, ut …, the Romans had a law stipulating that …). So an overly literal ...


6

Although the inchoative suffix -sc- is productive, I would advise against using it in everyday speech unless the verb is already a common one. I could say "pugnasco" (unattested) or "puellasco" (a couple usages), but it would call attention to itself in a way that doesn't seem fitting for the phrase "falling in love." Since I ...


6

The deep knowledge entailing understanding (think "carnal k." in English) and what you get from a detailed investigation is γνῶσις (gnôsis). A more intellectual variant entailing expertise is ἐπιστήμη (epistēmē); mastery (from "standing on it"). An acquired knowledge, so, something you learn, education, is μάθημα, μάθησις (mathēma, ...


5

There is an official English translation at the link you provided (labelled "EN" at the top right-hand side), which gives "as need arises and in the light of experience" as the official Vatican translation of this phrase. Translated overly literally, it means "according as necessity carries and experience counsels".


5

Others have suggested many ways to express falling in love in Latin. Let me address the grammar of your suggestion, even though it was too literal as a translation. There is only one problem, but it occurs twice. Pay attention to which case is needed with each preposition: Cum requires the ablative. Both haec and lingua need to be in this case: hac lingua. ...


5

A less literal (but perhaps more idiomatic) proposal: Amore huius linguae accendor (“I am ablaze with love for this language!”). Or, slightly less hot perhaps: Studium eius linguae me excitat (“The interest for [love of] this language excites me,” i.e. “I am very much interested in, I love this language”).


5

Sebastian is right. It's repeated in order to resume the sentence after a lengthy clause. We see this even in Classical Latin. I hesitate to call it a mistake, since it is so often deliberately chosen in order to alert the reader that the sentence has resumed. From Wills, Repetition in Latin Poetry, p. 66: Cicero also uses gemination to resume unfinished ...


5

The question should rather be: why was "facil" used in the Spanish translation ;-) Infinitive + esse means “one can, it is possible to,” etc. (But note that this is not classical. It appears to be a Graecism, which, however, according to Zumpt, is “found in the best Neo-Latin writers,” so I guess there are worse things.) pro eo ac debet means “...


4

The notes on Perseus hint at the answer. For Horace to be ultra terminum (probably) means he is beyond the boundary of his farm, i.e. he is wandering in the Sabine forest. It's essentially the same image as silva...in Sabina. What the translator seems to have done is that he forewent that particular reduplicated image and instead added another one of is own. ...


4

Πρόγραμμα is probably as good a candidate as any can be, http://stephanus.tlg.uci.edu/lsj/#eid=89478 (LSJ at TLG). Also, Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek (2015) has a meaning for Πρόγραμμα of 'that which is written first, order of the day' as per Demosthenes' and Aristotle's corpora; and the Cambridge Greek Lexicon (2021) defines it at programme of business,...


4

In this passage, Avicenna is saying that when a sense is greatly affected by the contrary of its object, it ceases to be able to sense. Here's a literal translation of your passage: But this kind of thing occurs from a great pain, as [our] sense is injured from the burning of fire or the sting of ice so that the body cannot sense it [i.e. the pain], but, ...


4

some additional information (work in progress) Robert H. Rodgers, who has been working on a new edition of Varro’s De Re Rustica, writes that “we have here a second proverbial expression” (Rodgers 2015, p. 170). Rodgers claims that “in direct speech the thought would then be porta itineri longissima est, ‘in contemplating a journey, the gate is the most ...


2

You could simply replace di (the gods) by vita (life) or fatum (fate), or its plural fata.


2

In this case ita and ut are unrelated. There is a construction ita…ut, but it is not used here. You can drop the intensifier "so" or ita and the sentence works equally well. (The emphasis is good to have, but not strictly necessary.) The suggestion from the book is unnecessarily complicated. One might even argue that it has two elements reversed by ...


2

quaedam and nōn quaedam Most fundamentally, quīdam/quaedam (plural) means "certain ones", i.e. some instances. But I gather (I'm not an expert) that unless some adjective of quantity is supplied, it usually suggests a small, manageable number—"a few". Googling "quaedam dicenda" turned up enough examples that that itself appears ...


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