22

Neither is correct, and timetere isn't a real Latin word. A correct translation depends somewhat on whether the command is directed at one person (e.g., you, the bearer of the tattoo) or the world at large (e.g., those who see the tattoo). For the former case (audience = one person), you could say Noli messorem timere or Ne messorem timueris. Ne messorem ...


22

Perditianus on Reddit pointed out on May 16 that this is exactly what Google Translate gives for “Live free or America dies”. So it seems likely that this piece of text was not composed in Latin by any human author. I don’t think “What does this mean” is a clear question when applied to a sequence of words produced in this manner. If you consider its ...


18

As the other answers indicate, this is nonsense. But I think it would be helpful to provide (1) a parsing of the nonsense Latin, and (2) a good translation of the intended phrase. Parsing of nonsense Latin vivamus: 1st person plural subjunctive, "let us live" vel: (inclusive) "or" libero: this can either by the 1st person of libero ("I deliver/free") or ...


16

Your suggestions are not quite right, and they might in fact be badly misunderstood. There are two things to consider here. The first one is simple. Omnia is plural and the verb must agree. Omnia (ex)urunt is grammatically valid. The second and more complicated thing is ergativity. Some English verbs behave ergatively, meaning that the one experiencing the ...


16

The Latin verb futuere is a good translation for the English verb "fuck" in the sense of sexual intercourse. The past participle fututus means "fucked" in this sense. As often in Latin, this can be intensified with a prefix. The adjective defututus can well be translated as "totally fucked", although many dictionaries give much softer translations like "...


15

When (Sir) Terry Pratchett was knighted, he chose this phrase as his heraldic motto. The official translation in that context is Noli Timere Messorem. This isn't the most natural word order (which would be noli messorem timere), but the meaning is the same: a command to a single person, "do not fear the reaper".


15

Nothing. I think it's Google Translate nonsense, but it's perplexing that it'd find its way to a cover. The results may depend on the user, but I get these translations: Live Free or Die: America > Free aut mori; Americae Live free or Die: America > Liberum vivere aut mori; Americae Live Free or die: America > Free aut mori; Americae Live free or die: ...


13

Domitor (without the -um, which is unnecessary here) would be a breaker in the sense of a breaker of wild horses. It doesn't have to do with physical breaking, which is what you want. Instead, you can use a derivative of a verb such as frangere – e.g., fractor. Though this word is unattested (at least in classical Latin), it's easy enough to derive it. You ...


13

The best phrase would be Deus optimus maximus, literally “God [is] best and greatest”. Not only is the meaning right but it has an ancient lineage which makes it perfect for this use. Iuppiter optimus maximus is a standard pagan formula for Jupiter. Christianity took this phrase over and the dedication Deo optimo maximo, “To God, best and greatest”, ...


13

As Joonas said, I would use a form of the participle fututus, literally "fucked". Here's one example, from Catullus VI: Cur? Nōn tam later' ecfutūta pandās, nī tu quid faciās ineptiārum Why? Because you wouldn't display your fucked-out body like this unless you were doing something obscene. (In this poem, Catullus is saying it's obvious that ...


11

Vēnī, vīdī, sūmpsī. literally means "I came, I saw, I took possession."* Sūmpsī is the past tense of sūmō, which primarily means "I take hold of (with my hands)" but is commonly extended to a wide variety of senses many of which still live in English: "assume", "presume", "subsume", "consume", "consumption", "presumptuous", and even "sumptuary" (pertaining ...


11

This appears to be a fragment, or rather part of a fragment, from a lost play of Sophocles, the Phthiotides or Women of Phthia. Here is a source that gives the full three-line fragment, which runs: Νέος πέφυκας· πολλὰ καὶ μαθεῖν σε δεῖ καὶ πόλλ' ἀκοῦσαι καὶ διδάσκεσθαι μακρά. ἀεί τι βούλου χρήσιμον προσμανθάνειν. A very literal translation: "You are ...


9

While in classical Latin summus might have been the best word, the Christian tradition uses altissimus to translate both the Hebrew and the Aramaic words found in the Old Testament for the concept of “highest God”. See e.g. Daniel, chap. 5, v. 18 (as in the Clementine Vulgate) O rex, Deus altissimus regnum et magnificentiam, gloriam et honorem dedit ...


8

One verb that Caesar himself often used to describe appropriating, claiming, or taking possession/control of a place is occupare. The Oxford Latin dictionary includes among the definitions of this verb 'To appropriate to oneself, seize to the exclusion of others'; 'To take possession of (for residence or cultivation), occupy'; 'To make one's own, assume (a ...


8

I agree with Sebastian Koppehel and the other commenters regarding most of their general comments, but I think that everyone may be overlooking the possibility that the ut clause might be taken as a result clause subordinated to the qui clause. Then annon can be read as introducing an indirect question subordinated to videat. A somewhat literal ...


7

Indeed, if you want these two words, the correct agreement is animal fidele for the neuter gender.


7

For "took possession" in this context, I would use the verb praesūmō; for the past tense, this becomes praesūmpsī, "I took possession (of something)". It's the root of the English word "presumptuous" and has similar connotations in Latin—which are very appropriate here, if your cat is anything like mine! To change it to third person ("she" instead of "I"), ...


7

A simple one: "veni, vidi, cepi" = "....I took; seized; captured; occupied; got; won over; made a choice of; selected". Yes, some of these (Pock. Ox. Lat. Dict.) have a military/ aggressive connotation (Caeser's original meaning); but, cats are known for taking and defending territory. Did you attempt to move her?


7

This is a bit of a convoluted sentence! The key is that the three genitives here have nothing to do with each other—one is a genitive of agent, one is a genitive of quantity a specific idiom, and one is the object of a verb that governs the genitive. …δ᾽ οὖν καὶ… And seriously… …ἐγὼ…αὐτὸς… …I myself… …ὀλίγου… …almost… …ἐμαυτοῦ ἐπελαθόμην …forgot myself… …ὑπ᾽...


7

Feedback on your translation While concludere is obviously etymologically related to the English "conclude", it does not quite mean the same thing. It can mean "end" in the sense you want, but it also means things like "compress", "confine", or "shut up". In most use cases context would provide the correct ...


6

Death's motto makes me recall the Centurion scene in Monty Python's The Life of Brian. Non timetis in fact "don't fear", but rather "(you all) don't fear" in the indicative, rather than the imperative. Also "Messor" is in the nominative rather than the accusative. I expect that Mr Pratchett either deliberately mangled the phrase to be facetious or he simply ...


6

Stobaeus 2,31,16a quotes the trimeter as part of the same sequence of the first two trimeters, which come from Sophocles' Phthiotides (fr. *694 Radt), but it was secluded from Nauck, who assigned it to the fragmenta adespota (fr. 516a, see also B. Snell – R. Kannicht, Tragicorum Graecorum fragmenta II, 1981, p. 147). Your translation with imperative form is ...


6

"Per aspera ad abyssum et per abyssos ad caelum" Is this correct or will I make a fool out of myself? Yes, that's correct. You might also like Per aspera ad abyssum, ad astra per abyssum. Since your sentence is Dante's journey, I leave this grand verse here: "E quindi uscimmo a riveder le stelle" (Inferno XXXIV, 139) “and thence we ...


6

While one may intuitively think of using me or memet for "myself" here, the thing to keep in mind is that in your sentence "myself" is a predicative nominative - always look at the performed function in the sentence. This tells us we must use the nominative for it, that is ego again. Therefore the phrase is ego sum ego or, for more ...


6

Nope! Google Translate is very unreliable with Latin, and this suggestion is gibberish too. I'll refrain from trying to analyze the Google suggestion and offer something else instead: Par lupo venans par deo epulatur. This is best translated to English as: The one who hunts like a wolf feasts like a god. English isn't very good at capturing the ...


6

No, that translation is not grammatically valid. It means roughly "belief of law, long use, to be saved firmly" but it is somewhat incoherent. Let me go through a translation process step by step. As you seem to know, opinio iuris is a fixed expression and we can of course start with that. The modifiers will probably not be parts of standard legal Latin ...


5

As a musician my first thought goes to in excelsis Deo. Excelsis seems to have been translated in a multitude of ways. Some interesting thoughts on this and also on usage of in excelsis/altissimus are offered in this question. EDIT In a comment Joonas Ilmavirta kindly pointed out a grammatical error in my answer. For searchability I will simply copy the ...


5

For "it is right" I would use fas est. Literally this means "it is in accordance with divine law" (as opposed to human law), but in common use it just means "it is right/good/proper". It's typically linked up to an infinitive. Reddere is not a bad choice for "leave"; it literally means to give something back, or give it up to someone else. In this case, you'...


5

I would suggest "specierum fractor". Explanation "Fractor" is a noun derived from "frango (-is, -ĕre, -i, -actus)", meaning "to break". "Specierum" is Gn.Pl.F of "species (-ei)", which means "image, appearance, idea, impression", etc., and which was widely used in Antiquity and the Middle Ages. It is roughly equivalent to the Greek "εἰκών". Here it is ...


5

Here's my best guess at a translation: Whereas the particle הֲלוֹם (həlōm), Arabic هَلُمَّ‎ (halumma), "hither", "to here", [pr. appactim?] appears in Genesis 16:13 and Judges 10:7. Thus also Psalms 73:10, even though the Septuagint, Vulgate, and Syriac must be changed. Həlōm does indeed mean "hither" (Latin hūc), and it seems halumma means something ...


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