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13 votes
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looking for help with the Latin word for "open"

I think in this case, resero wins, because its primary meaning means "unlock." For aperio, the meanings derive from the action of opening a door or even uncovering an object. The verb ...
cmw's user avatar
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12 votes
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Translation of “in” as “and”

The passage comes from Cic. Fam. 9.4, namely from a letter to Varro. Apparently others have translated as you would expect: If you have a garden in your library, everything will be complete (...
Rafael's user avatar
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11 votes

Best modern translation for "Emperor"?

Another example I could have used was the Emperor of China or Japan. I'm going to lean more heavily on this one and suggest that none of your above options are ideal. Instead, you should go with ...
cmw's user avatar
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9 votes

To be One's Own Worst Enemy

There is a nice example (Ad Att. 10, 12a) where Cicero talks about various people who are not particularly sympathetic to C. Iulius Caesar – the people of Massilia who apparently did something to defy ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
8 votes

Is this translation correct?

'Say that x is not the case' is routinely rendered by using a form of negare as the main verb with a positive infinitive in the indirect statement. Also, if, as seems likely, the mother is the subject ...
cnread's user avatar
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7 votes
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Is there a better translation for the family motto "Fama candida rosa dulcior"?

As written, the motto is ambiguous. The only word whose function is immediately obvious is dulcior, a comparative adjective meaning "sweeter." The nominative ending (short -a) and the ...
brianpck's user avatar
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6 votes

"Infandum me jubes Regina renovare dolorem" -- Translation

Is the "translate" you mention Google Translate? If so, note that it's horribly inaccurate. That's but one link of several that demonstrate how inept that software is with Latin (and truth ...
cmw's user avatar
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6 votes
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Hí Cicerónem ipsum sécum iúnxérunt, nam eum semper díléxerant

Your translation seems fine to me except: "these of Cicero" makes no sense and is not found in the Latin -- hi is just "these" (people, men, senators, etc.). you got the tense of ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
6 votes
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Ipsí nihil per sé sine eó facere potuérunt

Unfortunately, both translations might indeed be a bit pleonastic since both ipsi and per se are translated to very similar sets of words in both English and Spanish. However, per se and ipse have ...
Theophylactus's user avatar
6 votes
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Best modern translation for "Emperor"?

There are some excellent answers here, and many great comments, but I am going to add my piece to the mix. You may be overthinking this. The English word "emperor" does not come directly ...
Figulus's user avatar
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6 votes
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How would you say "I think our stick insect will die by me giving it to our hamster to eat."? Can you use absolute ablative to mean a cause of death?

The subject of the ablative absolute tends to be different from that of the main clause. Therefore it is not a good choice. And even in a case where AA is a valid choice, it should probably be of the ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
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Cafaea pignerā est — the coffee is pledged?

First, the verb form you need is the perfect participle (in the nominative singular feminine). This is also what iacta is in alea iacta est, the perfect participle of iacere. In your case that would ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
5 votes
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Quisque ipse sé díligit, quod quisque per sé sibi cárus est

Note that there is no subjunctive in the second part, and that quod has a lot of alternative meanings. One relevant meaning of quod that seems to apply here is because: Everyone loves themselves ...
Rafael's user avatar
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5 votes
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To be One's Own Worst Enemy

No, the translation doesn't quite work. You have the genitive of suus ipse, but "himself". The reference is unclear. I don't recall seeing suus together with ipsius — the acceptability of ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes

Does “interranima” mean “inner soul”?

No. Anima is the Latin word for soul, apart from that the word is not a proper Latin construction and it's not clear what it could mean. For what it's worth, inter means "between" or "...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
4 votes

Reimagining the logical gates in Latin

As far as I know, the names, especially the abbreviated ones you list, are always in English whether or not the surrounding text is in English. Technical abbreviations like this tend to be universal, ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes

Very new learner looking for feed back

First, welcome to this forum, and congratulations on your decision to learn the beautiful Latin language. Rem pulcherrimam aggressus es, quae tibi magnam adferat gaudiam. (You have embarked on a most ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
3 votes

Latin translation of "Killing in the name of"

Too long for a comment, so... Comments have indicated that killing is a noun, or rather a gerund. Thus the verb form occidere might not be appropriate. The noun form is occisio. You have also ...
Andrew Leach's user avatar
3 votes

Is sexágéní horae an appropriate translation of minute/minuto?

No, because sexageni is a distributive number and means “sixty each.” Pater filiis suis denarios sexagenos dono dedit = The father gave his sons sixty denars each (denarios sexaginta would be sixty in ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Némó fíliam acerbam cónsulis ipsíus diú díligere potuit

Your translation is correct. Consulis ipsius means exactly what you translated it to, both in Spanish (del mismísimo cónsul) and English (of the consul himself). As for the meaning of the whole ...
Theophylactus's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

"I am on imperial business and may not be interfered with..."

A couple of suggestions: Use fungi instead of agere. (This you did in your revised attempt.) Use an adjective like in English. Imperiale is better than imperii. I think the second part works better ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes

If the laws of physics no longer apply in the future, god help you

A 'literal' translation could be: si quando leges physicae valere desiverint, dominus te adiuvet. 'If ever the laws of physics will have ceased to apply (to be valid), may God help you.' However, as ...
cnread's user avatar
  • 20.1k
3 votes

If blood speaks, DNA is its voice

DNA vox sanguinis This literally means just "DNA, the voice of blood." It's not a literal translation of what you asked, but it's in the pithy style of Latin mottos. The brevity also makes ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
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3 votes

To be One's Own Worst Enemy

Here is a variation on the theme expressed in Seb's answer, also from Cicero: "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" 5. 28: "necesseque est, si quis sibi ipsi inimicus est, eum quae bona sunt ...
tony's user avatar
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3 votes

Very new learner looking for feed back

This response is to provide feedback on the translation as asked, as opposed to providing a translation. The 'we active present tense' form for the verbs:- latro, latrare, is latramus, for the verb:-...
fantome's user avatar
  • 332
3 votes
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"hōc enim ūnō modō...scelus" or "hoc enim ūnō modō...scelus" ? (Ritchie's Fabulae faciles, §20)

Both readings are plausible and the essential message is the same, so the choice of interpretation might not even show up in a translation. The distinction is there, but my first point is to encourage ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
2 votes

Implied pronouns

In English, practically every noun needs to be marked with a determiner. You can't just know fate; you have to know Fate, or a fate, or the fate, or your fate, or this fate, and so on. In Latin, they'...
Draconis's user avatar
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2 votes
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Do these Latin phrases make sense?

I think that your grammar and syntax are right. Especially your first line, Ecclesia semper reformanda. This is a classic motto, and it means exactly what you say. Your second line, Spiritus Sancti ...
Figulus's user avatar
  • 4,599
2 votes

Do my Latin phrases make sense?

I would say In vita, difficultas; in difficultate, doctrina (or doctrinae if you meant plural). I think Pugna,ae refers more to physical battles or arguments, while difficultas, -atis refers to ...
Davide's user avatar
  • 175
2 votes

A translation for "A part for understanding the whole" - "ad res" or "ad rem"?

I have never seen ad + gerundive used in this way. And pars is also not commonly used with ad. If you look at the grammar books, you'll find claims that ad + gerund(ive) is sometimes used to denote ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar

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