26

Google Translate is unreliable with Latin and you should not take anything it gives seriously. The suggestion non insectum opus est sounds like "an insect is not work". I am not aware of good Latin words for "bug" or "feature". Therefore I would take a different approach and suggest: Non forte sed ratione. Not by chance but by ...


23

That's not a simple question, because this is not a real sentence Perditianus on Reddit pointed out on May 16 that this is exactly what Google Translate gives for “Live free or America dies”. So it seems likely that this piece of text was not composed in Latin by any human author. I don’t think “What does this mean” is a clear question when applied to a ...


20

As the other answers indicate, this is nonsense. But I think it would be helpful to provide (1) a parsing of the nonsense Latin, and (2) a good translation of the intended phrase. Parsing of nonsense Latin vivamus: 1st person plural subjunctive, "let us live" vel: (inclusive) "or" libero: this can either by the 1st person of libero ("I deliver/free") or ...


16

Nothing. I think it's Google Translate nonsense, but it's perplexing that it'd find its way to a cover. The results may depend on the user, but I get these translations: Live Free or Die: America > Free aut mori; Americae Live free or Die: America > Liberum vivere aut mori; Americae Live Free or die: America > Free aut mori; Americae Live free or die: ...


14

Personally, I'd simplify somewhat and use an impersonal passive: hinc illuc non (per)venitur, 'There is no arriving to that place from this place.' Or, I'd use what you've done but change the verb to possis to indicate a generic 'you' (i.e., 'one'). Otherwise, I believe what you've done is correct. The pairing of hinc and illuc in this way is well attested. ...


10

Tenebrae is a good choice for “darkness.” The darkness is of course metaphorical here, presumably standing for unreason and injustice. The association of light and visibility with an agreeable state of affairs, and of darkness and clouded vision with the opposite, exists in Latin as well and is indeed expressed by tenebrae or caligo. For example, Cicero says:...


10

To answer the main question, no—the owner goes into the genitive case, not the thing being owned. It's like the 's in English: you say Quintus's studies, with "Quintus" getting the special marker. So if you wanted to be very explicit about whose studies they are, you could say studia Quintī. You could also use the possessive adjective suus -a -um &...


9

Other than the phrase in question, your translation is excellent. Tanti is a so-called "genitive of indefinite value", see Allen and Greenough section 417. This is a use of adjectives expressing quantity in the context of a verb whose meaning can assign or assess value, as here fit: literally, "it (the judgment) becomes / is made of such value ...


8

I agree with Sebastian Koppehel and the other commenters regarding most of their general comments, but I think that everyone may be overlooking the possibility that the ut clause might be taken as a result clause subordinated to the qui clause. Then annon can be read as introducing an indirect question subordinated to videat. A somewhat literal ...


8

No! The Latin word genius means something like a spirit, and has nothing to do with "sonic". Google Translate is not to be trusted at all with Latin, and you have found yet another piece of evidence of this. The word sonic comes from the Latin word sonus, "sound". From this noun you can derive the adjective sonicus, "sound-related&...


8

Here's my attempt at a compromise between extreme literalism and full idiomatic English (so that hopefully it'll be helpful to you as you compare against the Greek). Greek text taken from the SBL edition, with a couple parts rearranged slightly to make the English flow better. This edition notably adds accents and breathings (which weren't consistent in the ...


8

Memini can take either an accusative or a genitive, and there is a difference in meaning, but you're presumably modelling this on "memento mori", so let's use an accusative (mori may not particularly look like an accusative but it's an infinitive and infinitives are neuter so the nominative and accusative are identical). Memento is obviously fine: ...


7

This is a bit of a convoluted sentence! The key is that the three genitives here have nothing to do with each other—one is a genitive of agent, one is a genitive of quantity a specific idiom, and one is the object of a verb that governs the genitive. …δ᾽ οὖν καὶ… And seriously… …ἐγὼ…αὐτὸς… …I myself… …ὀλίγου… …almost… …ἐμαυτοῦ ἐπελαθόμην …forgot myself… …ὑπ᾽...


7

Henry de Bracton, a medieval English jurist, in his book De Legibus et Consuetudinibus Angliae, defined furtum as follows: … furtum est secundum leges contrectatio rei alienæ fraudulenta animo furandi, invito illo cuius res illa fuerit. … theft is, according to the laws, a deceitful touching of a thing that belongs to someone else with the intent to ...


7

Feedback on your translation While concludere is obviously etymologically related to the English "conclude", it does not quite mean the same thing. It can mean "end" in the sense you want, but it also means things like "compress", "confine", or "shut up". In most use cases context would provide the correct ...


7

The slogan nihil labore difficile is grammatically correct, but ambiguous and unclear. But being ambiguous and unclear is not at all unusual for a motto. If we read labore as an instrumental ablative, the slogan means "nothing is difficult with work", as intended. I will return to this phrase in a moment. If we read labore as an ablative of respect,...


7

Indeed, both word orders are fine, although it is more common to put the adjective second. But beware that the two words you have don't have exactly the same meaning as "perfect body" nor do they necessarily make an idiomatic translation: Perfectum is really a participle meaning quite literally "thoroughly done" and often means "...


7

Short and crisp suggestion: Hinc illuc iter nullum (est).


6

Neither genitive nor ablative: secundum takes the accusative, so the phrase would be secundum legem latam. You can usually find which case a preposition takes from its dictionary entry.


6

Nope! Google Translate is very unreliable with Latin, and this suggestion is gibberish too. I'll refrain from trying to analyze the Google suggestion and offer something else instead: Par lupo venans par deo epulatur. This is best translated to English as: The one who hunts like a wolf feasts like a god. English isn't very good at capturing the ...


6

No, that translation is not grammatically valid. It means roughly "belief of law, long use, to be saved firmly" but it is somewhat incoherent. Let me go through a translation process step by step. As you seem to know, opinio iuris is a fixed expression and we can of course start with that. The modifiers will probably not be parts of standard legal Latin ...


6

To see what nuances a Latin word has, a list of translations to another language like English is not quite enough. Examples, descriptions, and explanations help get a better picture. The link you give is better than a mere list, but the entry in this online version of the dictionary by Lewis and Short is even better. The phrase para bellum can be well ...


6

The entry for pro in Lewis & Short mentions at II that the preposition pro comes with the ablative but remarks that accusative is possible in late Latin. As you quote a coat of arms, influences of late Latin are certainly a possibility. I don't know what the relative frequency of the two cases with pro is in any given era — apart from the accusative ...


6

No, that is not a correct translation, but the root problem is probably not a mistranslation from Latin to English, but rather from English to Latin. The Latin sentence was very likely created specifically for the motion picture – as far as I can see, it does not appear anywhere else – and, as they say, mistakes were made. There are a few problems here: deo ...


6

Id agendum est… This is a construction called the gerundive of obligation. Literally, this means "it must be done" or "it should be done"; the "it" here is somewhat generic, and could be translated into English as "things" or "something". (Side note: the plural of agendum is agenda, which was borrowed ...


6

Your assumption is correct! Moving the words around to correspond to the English word order: Mors est Death is… exsolutio et finis …a release and an end… dolorum omnium …of all pains. You could also use "suffering" or "sorrow(s)" for dolōrum here, if you prefer, and/or "every" for omnium. But the idea is the same.


6

Pluperfect refers to "the past of the past": an event that happened before another past event. The usual English translation is "I had made this", as in "I had made this before they stole it". The perfect tense can have two different meanings in Classical Latin: it can either indicate that something's been completed and it's the ...


6

At first I also thought this was a basic question, but I think it is actually not that easy to answer. Let us first look at your suggestions. I am afraid the answer to your question: “Am I off by miles?” is yes. You are on the right path with the three words mors, malus and memoria but beyond that, frankly, the sentences look like a leisurely but somewhat ...


5

I notice you chose a curiously mathematical wording. In light of this, you could also use a mathematical expression in Latin, and say: Valorem constantem habeo. (Personally, I'd lose the ego.) This is not classical Latin; in fact, the ancient Romans did not know the word valor. But this is the sort of Latin that Euler or Gauss wrote. There is actually a ...


5

It is mostly but not entirely correctly inflected Latin, but in the first and second lines the words do not really come together into comprehensible sentences: in the first sentence, suspirare does not usually stand with ab, and it is not clear what it is supposed to mean (“sigh away from his/her shoulder” or some such?) in the second sentence, basit is not ...


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