5

It is mostly but not entirely correctly inflected Latin, but in the first and second lines the words do not really come together into comprehensible sentences: in the first sentence, suspirare does not usually stand with ab, and it is not clear what it is supposed to mean (“sigh away from his/her shoulder” or some such?) in the second sentence, basit is not ...


4

It literally means "[The] gods better!": di is the nominative plural of deus 'god', melius is the comparative adverb of bonus 'good'. The verb is omitted and will have to be deduced from whatever context you use it in; in the quoted case it's presumably something like viderunt (literally "the gods saw better"), but for exclamations ...


3

De minimis non curat Deus This is valid Latin, and means literally "God doesn't care about tiny things". Google Translate is just extremely bad at Latin, for a few reasons: it doesn't do well with inflected languages in general, since it generally treats words as atomic units that can't be broken down further, and the Latin corpus is extremely ...


1

The words are generally suitable. virtus can indeed mean strength of character, body and mind, amor is indeed love, and fortitudo can mean courage. However, you are right that virtus and fortitudo overlap more than the corresponding English words strength and courage do. If you want a word meaning only courage, you could use audacia, but be aware that this ...


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